Blog Archives

November 10 in San Antonio history…

1891
The entire west block of Military Plaza, including the Fashion Theater , is consumed by fire.

1969
Sesame Street premieres on KLRN Channel 9 at 4:30 (right), just after “Misterogers,” later called “Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood.”

1989
The San Antonio Light‘s banner headline announces the fall of the Berlin Wall.

October 13 in San Antonio history…

1896
The big chandelier in the rotunda of the Menger Hotel was swung into position. The 700-pound article, containing 3,000 pieces of prismatic glass, cost $300.

1913
The State Department has instructed Ambassador to Spain Willard to obtain a copy of the original charter of San Antonio granted by King Ferdinand VI in 1773.

1975
The Ace in the Hole band, featuring singer George Strait, plays their first concert – just up the road at Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos.

September 24 in San Antonio history…

1896
The city brewery (Pearl) is repairing several blocks of River Avenue (Broadway) on its own account since the street was so full of holes their big wagon could not get out.

1928
C. C. Wolfe, well-known San Antonio executive, will be the general manager of the new Sears, Roebuck & Co. store which will open on Feb. 1.

1946
Customers of local eating establishments were called upon today to join in the Health Department’s drive against unsanitary practices in such places.  They are urged to register complaints about such practices.

August 17 in San Antonio history…

1872
Scientific American magazine features Andrew Mühl’s improved ice making machine, which had been patented the previous November.  He first built an ice-making machine in San Antonio in 1867.

1896
In opening a trench for sewers on W. Houston, workmen today unearthed a quantity of human bodies and skulls.

1990
The San Marcos Factory Shops, a 300,000 foot manufacturers outlet off Interstate 35, kicks off a three-day grand opening at noon today.  The $15 million center on the southern edge of San Marcos, contains more than 60 shops offering merchandise from apparel, accessory and home furnishings manufacturers throughout the nation.

August 10 in San Antonio history…

1866
The Treue der Union (“Loyalty to the Union”) monument in Comfort, Texas is dedicated to commemorate the pro-Union soldiers killed at the Battle of the Nueces on August 10, 1862.  The monument remains as the only German-language monument to the Union in the South where the remains of those killed in battle are buried, and where an 1866 thirty-six star American flag flies at half-staff.

1896
Two men raced the San Antonio and Aransas Pass passenger train a half-mile yesterday on their bicycles and beat the train by several wheel lengths. The train was flying along at 35 miles per hour.

1908
A force of men is today removing the cannons which were unearthed on the Gibbs property at Houston and Avenue D. The largest is to be taken to the Alamo, the next to Col. Gibbs and the other three to the Mavericks.

 

April 7 in San Antonio history…

1896
The San Antonio City Council passes an ordinance making it “unlawful for any person to interfere in any manner with any other person or persons engaged in forming or proceeding with a procession or parade for legal purpose on the streets or plazas of San Antonio.”  The fine for violation is set for not more than twenty-five dollars.

1924
Bible reading exercises, made mandatory by action of the School Board, started the day in all San Antonio schools.

1947
A nationwide telephone strike begins at 6 a.m.  1,300 members of the telephone workers union are off the job in San Antonio. Local phone service on the dial system will not be affected until the lack of maintenance work causes breakdowns, it was pointed out by Paul West, district manager of the Southwestern Bell Company. How long this will be is anybody’s guess. A supervisory force is manning switchboards, West said, and is prepared to handle a limited number of long-distance and other calls requiring an operator. He urged telephone users to avoid all such as far as possible.

1947 – SPW – 2019

March 25 in San Antonio history…

1896
An old grant, it has been discovered, gives the Alamo property nine more feet on the south side of the structure than it now occupies.

1983
The Convention Center Arena hosts a concert with Prince, The Time and Vanity 6.

December 22 in San Antonio history…

1896
Queen Liliuokalani, of the Hawaiian Islands, passes through San Antonio on her way to Boston.

1966
The City Council today approved a contract for the construction of a 622-foot tower for HemisFair 1968 and sold $5.5 million in bonds to pay for the structure.

1967
The final pre-cast and furnished room (of 496) is flown into place on the 20th floor of the Palacio Del Rio Hotel.  Placement of the last room was scheduled for January 5, but H. B. Zachry’s crews became so adept at hoising the 35-ton concrete rooms the “last flight” was moved up.

September 24 in San Antonio history…

1896
The city brewery is repairing several blocks of River [now Broadway] on its own account since the street was so full of holes their big wagon could not get out.

1918 – World War I
Col. Alexander Weatherill, chief of staff of the 18th division, Camp Travis, contradicts an Associated Press report from Washington that states that there is influenza in Camp Travis, saying, “Such [a] report is not only not substantiated by facts, but is positively dangerous to the morale of the camp.”

1974
“Thunder” is selected from over 1,500 entries for San Antonio’s new North American Soccer League team.  Mike Boyle is named General Manager of the team.  He was previously GM of the San Antonio Brewers.

August 5 in San Antonio history…

1896
The Alamo souvenir booth has been closed for the summer months, as the keep says the times are too hard for people to buy patriotic emblems, etc.

1918 – World War I
A new order to save fuel, already in effect in most places, becomes operative here tonight.  The order requires that street lights be kept to a minimum and that lights for display and illumination of business houses be reduced to absolute necessity.  It designates Monday and Tuesday nights each week as “lightless nights.”

1922
San Antonio’s first radio station (WJAE) begins broadcasting, but lasts only a few months.