Blog Archives

November 10 in San Antonio history…

1891
The entire west block of Military Plaza, including the Fashion Theater, is consumed by fire.

1917 – World War I
Carpentry and plumbing work on buildings at Camp Travis will be completed by tonight and the large force of carpenters and plumbers will be discharged, according to an announcement yesterday at Stone and Webster headquarters.  The steam fitters who are now completing the heating plants in various buildings will finish their work by November 24.

1954
Ruth Brown (“Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean”) and Charles Brown (“Merry Christmas, Baby”) perform at the [Carver] Library Auditorium.

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September 17 in San Antonio history…

1954
The Los Angeles Rams play an exhibition game against the Philadelphia Eagles in Alamo Stadium. The Eagles win (right).

1983
Convention Center Arena features a concert with Quiet Riot, Axe and the first San Antonio appearance of Seattle’s Queensrÿche.

1988
Hurricane Gilbert spawns a total of 47 tornadoes in South Central Texas (and at least 13 in Bexar County), causing three fatalities in San Antonio. Local damage was estimated at $35 million with damage to vehicles, homes, apartments and businesses

September 3 in San Antonio history…

1936
Alamo Plaza is decided upon as the location for the cenotaph honoring the Alamo heroes.

1954
Every telephone number in San Antonio will be changed at midnight tonight as special crews switch 127,000 lines to the new metropolitan numbering plan that requires dialing two letters and five digits (right).

1955
An old San Antonio custom, serenading by troubadours in Haymarket Plaza, has been revived today.  The practice was discontinued about 10 years ago.  Singing by troubadours and señoritas will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. each Saturday at the plaza, said acting City Market Manager Thomas Melchor.

August 20 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The 94th Aero Squadron is organized at Kelly Field.  The squadron was one of the first American pursuit squadrons to reach the Western Front and see combat, becoming one of the most famous. The 94th was highly publicized in the American print media of the time, and its exploits “over there” were widely reported on the home front. Its squadron emblem, the “Hat in the Ring” became a symbol in the minds of the American Public of the American Air Service of World War I. Three notable air aces served with the squadron, Eddie Rickenbacker, who was awarded almost every decoration attainable, including the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service Cross.

1935
The rock in the old post office, quarried from the hills of Texas prior to 1888, will go into a $1 million Catholic shrine, to be built during the centennial.  The shrine, to be dedicated to St. Anthony, will be one of the finest in the United States. Entrance to the structure will be a replica of the Alamo, which was the first shrine to St. Anthony in the Unitet States. The new national shrine will be known as the New Alamo.

1954
A malfunction in the mechanism to raise and lower the new tainter gate installed in the San Antonio River at Market Street caused the gate to crash with enough force to be heard and felt for blocks this afternoon.

August 7 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A board of aviation officers, including Major Henry H. Arnold and Captain Edgar, from Washington, arrived in San Antonio this morning and reported to department headquarters before beginning an inspection of Camp Kelly and the auxiliary flying field. The two officers were taken to Camp Kelly by Captain Paul Ferron, aeronautical officer of the department, and probably will remain until Wednesday night.

1937
The first contribution to the newly constructed Alamo museum, comprising valued documents of early Texas, has been received by Mrs. Leita Small, Alamo custodian. The documents were presented by Mrs. Susan Miller, 115 Humphrey street, and her kinswoman, Mrs. James Sandusky Clarke, of Baltimore. Mrs. Clarke is a guest at the Miller home. Among the relics is the diary of James McKnight, who fought in the Texas revolution. The diary is dated 1838. McKnight was an ancestor of he donors. Still another of the documents is a letter dated 1842 and signed by T. Borden Jr., as collector of customs at Galveston.

1945
The San Antonio Express and Light newspapers both report that a bomb, larger than any previously known, was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima causing great damage and loss of life.  However, back on July 16, the San Antonio newspapers did not pick up a little-publicized story printed in the Gallup, NM;  Santa Fe, NM and El Paso newspapers that mentioned a huge explosion at a munitions dump near the Alamogordo Army Air Base.  This was actually the first nuclear test and would have been quite a scoop.  News of the July 16 test was finally printed today along with the news of the Hiroshima bombing.

1954>August 7 in San Antonio history...
Johnny Cash marries Vivian Liberto (right) at St. Anne’s Catholic Church in San Antonio.

June 24 in San Antonio history…

1895
St. Louis College graduates its first class – a graduating class of two. [St. Mary’s downtown college merged with St. Louis college in 1921.]

1917 – World War I
Thomas A. Carr, general superintendent, and J. G. Woods, assistant superintendent for the Stone-Webster Company of Boston, reached San Antonio last night to begin actual construction
at Camp Wilson on the army cantonment which is to house the 40.000 troops to be brought here September I for training.

1954
Three of the six youths charged with burning the city’s 80-foot Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza last New year were fined $25 and costs by Judge McCollum Burnett.

June 20 in San Antonio history…

1906
The architect for Alamo Heights said the new addition would be “a strictly fashionable residence area.”

1922heights_1922
Residents of Alamo Heights vote overwhelmingly to incorporate.  The vote cast today was the heaviest ever recorded on an incorporation election there, all others having been voted down. The favorable vote this time is said to have been due to the rumored extension of the city limits of San Antonio which would have taken in the Heights.

1954
San Antonio chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People today voted unanimously to instruct its legal redress committee to take immediate steps to have the city’s segregated swimming pool ordinance declared unconstitutional.

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Subscriptions for the purchase of the ancient governor’s palace, a relic of the royal government of Spain, which stands on Military Plaza and which is in danger of being torn down, are beginning to be received by the committee working for its preservation, Miss Adina De Zavala, chairman. A regular plan of campaign has not been decided upon, but a meeting of the executive and advisory
committees will be held at some time next week, the time and place to be announced later. This building is one of the oldest structures in San Antonio and was erected by the Spanish government
as the administrative palace when Texas was a province of Spain. In spite of disfiguring signs and years of neglect and abuse, the building has a commanding appearance and the ancient seal of Spain still remains over the door.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas.  The law would be repealed two years later, on March 16, 1956.

1957
Bill Doggett and his combo, featuring San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, play Woodlake Country Club.

March 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The San Antonio newspapers print an appeal for enlistment from the Secretary of Navy (right) as the drumbeat of war gets louder.

1954
Big Joe Turner plays Woodlake Country Club, along with Guitar Slim and his orchestra.

1968
Lackland Air Force Base has begun construction of five buildings that will be the beginning of the “super barracks” for Air Force basic trainees.  The buildings, which will cost $3 million each to build, will house 1,040 men.  The first of the new buildings is scheduled for completion in February 1969.  All five should be completed by June 1969.

March 10 in San Antonio history…

1917
Charged with “publicly cursing and abusing the President and Congress of the United States,” Fred Meister, a traveling salesman residing on Muncey Street, is arrested by John L. Dibrell, chief deputy United States Marshal. The complaint against Meister sworn to by Special Agent Utley states: “… one Fred Meister, in violation of sections 4 and 275 of the penal code of the United States, did unlawfully incite, set on foot and engage in a rebellion and insurrection against the authority of the United States and the law thereof, and give aid and comfort thereto, in that he did publicly in the post office at San Antonio, Texas, curse and abuse the President and Congress of the United States, and stated he would soon have an opportunity to fight in this country for Germany against the United States, and said he would not fight for the United States flag, and that there were 20,000 German-Americans in the United States and 40,000 in Mexico who would fight against the United States and are going to, yet.”

1949image
The Alameda Theater on Houston Street (right) holds its grand opening.

1954
Woodlake Country Club hosts Roy Milton & His Solid Senders, Pee Wee Crayton, Camille Howard, Lillie Greenwood and Freddie Clark.