Blog Archives

June 24 in San Antonio history…

1895
St. Louis College graduates its first class – a graduating class of two. [St. Mary’s downtown college merged with St. Louis college in 1921.]

1917 – World War I
Thomas A. Carr, general superintendent, and J. G. Woods, assistant superintendent for the Stone-Webster Company of Boston, reached San Antonio last night to begin actual construction
at Camp Wilson on the army cantonment which is to house the 40.000 troops to be brought here September I for training.

1954
Three of the six youths charged with burning the city’s 80-foot Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza last New year were fined $25 and costs by Judge McCollum Burnett.

June 20 in San Antonio history…

1906
The architect for Alamo Heights said the new addition would be “a strictly fashionable residence area.”

1922heights_1922
Residents of Alamo Heights vote overwhelmingly to incorporate.  The vote cast today was the heaviest ever recorded on an incorporation election there, all others having been voted down. The favorable vote this time is said to have been due to the rumored extension of the city limits of San Antonio which would have taken in the Heights.

1954
San Antonio chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People today voted unanimously to instruct its legal redress committee to take immediate steps to have the city’s segregated swimming pool ordinance declared unconstitutional.

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Subscriptions for the purchase of the ancient governor’s palace, a relic of the royal government of Spain, which stands on Military Plaza and which is in danger of being torn down, are beginning to be received by the committee working for its preservation, Miss Adina De Zavala, chairman. A regular plan of campaign has not been decided upon, but a meeting of the executive and advisory
committees will be held at some time next week, the time and place to be announced later. This building is one of the oldest structures in San Antonio and was erected by the Spanish government
as the administrative palace when Texas was a province of Spain. In spite of disfiguring signs and years of neglect and abuse, the building has a commanding appearance and the ancient seal of Spain still remains over the door.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas.  The law would be repealed two years later, on March 16, 1956.

1957
Bill Doggett and his combo, featuring San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, play Woodlake Country Club.

March 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The San Antonio newspapers print an appeal for enlistment from the Secretary of Navy (right) as the drumbeat of war gets louder.

1954
Big Joe Turner plays Woodlake Country Club, along with Guitar Slim and his orchestra.

1968
Lackland Air Force Base has begun construction of five buildings that will be the beginning of the “super barracks” for Air Force basic trainees.  The buildings, which will cost $3 million each to build, will house 1,040 men.  The first of the new buildings is scheduled for completion in February 1969.  All five should be completed by June 1969.

March 10 in San Antonio history…

1917
Charged with “publicly cursing and abusing the President and Congress of the United States,” Fred Meister, a traveling salesman residing on Muncey Street, is arrested by John L. Dibrell, chief deputy United States Marshal. The complaint against Meister sworn to by Special Agent Utley states: “… one Fred Meister, in violation of sections 4 and 275 of the penal code of the United States, did unlawfully incite, set on foot and engage in a rebellion and insurrection against the authority of the United States and the law thereof, and give aid and comfort thereto, in that he did publicly in the post office at San Antonio, Texas, curse and abuse the President and Congress of the United States, and stated he would soon have an opportunity to fight in this country for Germany against the United States, and said he would not fight for the United States flag, and that there were 20,000 German-Americans in the United States and 40,000 in Mexico who would fight against the United States and are going to, yet.”

1949image
The Alameda Theater on Houston Street (right) holds its grand opening.

1954
Woodlake Country Club hosts Roy Milton & His Solid Senders, Pee Wee Crayton, Camille Howard, Lillie Greenwood and Freddie Clark.

March 7 in San Antonio history…

1900
The musical wizard, the greatest pianist of the age, Ignace J. Paderewski, will play at 8:15 p.m. tonight at the Grand Opera House.

1954
Thurgood Marshall (right), NAACP’s chief counsel in the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court case, speaks at Second Baptist Church.

1955
The Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo performs at the Municipal Auditorium as the highlight of the San Antonio Symphony’s 1954-55 season.

January 11 in San Antonio history…

1916
Brackenridge High School reachs an all-time high enrollment record of 490 students.

1954>January 11 in San Antonio history...
San Antonio today mourned the death of one of its most prominent citizens. Edgar Tobin, WWI flying ace, who with 11 other persons was killed yesterday in a Louisiana plane crash while returning from a hunting trip.

1957
Eighty county jail prisoners, objecting that their breakfast toast was toasted only on one side, staged an hour-long demonstration.Sheriff Owen Kilday quelled the disturbance quickly.

January 2 in San Antonio history…

1944
Olivia DeHavilland, brown-haired movie star, visits patients at Brooke General Hospital.

1954
Teen-age vandals set fire to the 55-foot municipal Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza. Only the steel frame and a charred utility pole remained.

1985
Derrick Gervin, younger brother of George “Iceman” Gervin, scores 51 points for the UTSA Roadrunners as they defeat Baylor, 101-91, in the UTSA Convocation Center.

November 17 in San Antonio history….

1923
San Antonio hosts its first intercollegiate football game at Schwab Field between the St. Edward’s University Saints and the Hillbillies of Daniel Baker College of Brownwood.  St. Edward’s rolls over Daniel Baker, 48-0.

1934
Lyndon B. Johnson marries Claudia Alta “Lady Bird” Taylor at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in San Antonio. LBJ didn’t have a wedding band for her and had asked Dan Quill, friend and Postmaster of San Antonio, to get one. Quill bought a wedding band at the nearby Sears, Roebuck & Co. for $2.50.  (The Sears store was located in what is now called the Tower Life Building.) After the wedding, they had dinner at the St. Anthony Hotel and spent their wedding night at the Plaza Hotel.

1954togo-tosh-16
Tosh Togo (right), a wrestler making his first appearance in San Antonio, fights to a draw in a 15-minute match with Larry Chene at Wrestlethon at Municipal Auditorium.  (Togo’s real name was Toshiyuki “Harold” Sakata, and he would find fame ten years later as the mute henchman to the titular villain in the James Bond movie “Goldfinger.”)

 

September 10 in San Antonio history…

1886geronimo
Geronimo (front row, third from right), along with 26 other members of the Chiricahua Apache tribe, is brought to Ft. Sam Houston after his surrender in Mexico.  He will be held here for about six weeks before being sent to Ft. Pickens in Pensacola, Florida

1921
With a known death list of 37 that may total more than 200 when all the missing are accounted for, and with a property loss of near $5 million, San Antonio was suffering the worst flood in its history.

1954
A San Antonio Zoo employee has his lower arm amputated after it is bitten and mutilated by a chimpanzee.