Blog Archives

October 4 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I>October 4 in San Antonio history...
Camp Travis is to supplant Camp Funston, Leon Springs, as a training school for officers of the reserve corps, and the camp at Leon Springs is to be utilized for other military purposes.  Just what use will be made of the reservation has not been made public.

1956
The new Twin Screen Suburban Outdoor Theater opens at Loop 13 and Highway 90 East.

1957
Buddy Holly & the Crickets make their only San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium with “The Biggest Show of Stars for ’57.” Along with the Crickets, the bill includes: Fats Domino, LaVern Baker, The Drifters, Frankie Lymon, Chuck Berry, Clyde McPhatter, Eddie Cochran, The Diamonds, Buddy Knox, Jimmy Bowen and Paul Anka (right). The concert of many rock and roll stars was probably overshadowed with the news that the Soviet Union had launched an artificial “star” that day – Sputnik.

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September 22 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Work on the construction of a garbage incinerator for San Antonio which will consume a total of more than 100 tons of refuse during each 24-hour period, will start as soon as final arrangements can be made. Unless unforeseen difficulties should interfere, Mayor Bell and Commissioner Lambert hope to have the new system in operation by January 1, 1918.
The site for the new incinerator already has been selected. It is located just east of the Salado Creek and south of the Seguin Road.

1921
The San Antonio Commissioners pass an ordinance “prohibiting any person, firm or corporation, excepting regularly licensed druggists and practicing, licensed physicians, to have in his or their possession, or to smoke, or in any manner use marihuana, Indian hemp, loco weed or Cannibis Indica.  Anyone found with any of the above named substances, in any form, except those indicated, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, shall be fined not less than $10 dollars and not more than $200 dollars.”

1957
T.Texas Tyler, hillbilly singer who found fame with his 1948 hit “Deck of Cards,” was singing the San Antonio blues from the city jail, charged with possession of marijuana.  Tyler, 41, Nashville, whose real name is David Luke Myrick, was arrested in the White Plaza Hotel by Lt. Charles Doerr and other narcotics officers.  Doerr said that 45 marijuana cigarettes were found in his suitcase.  T. Texas was nabbed shortly before he was to have appeared at the Municipal Auditorium tonight with the Grand Old Opry show. He didn’t make the night appearance as result of his arrest but had made the Sunday matinee.

September 1 in San Antonio history…

1917
Miss Katherine Stinson’s Chicago-New York airplane flight lasted just 41 minutes today.  Miss Stinson, ambitious to break Ruth Law’s record for the flight, left the ground in Chicago at 5:09 a.m.  At Porter, Indiana, at 5:50 a.m., her engine malfunctioned and she volplaned.  She failed to see some telephone wires and her machine was damaged.  The aviatrix was unhurt.  After some repairs, she will try again next week.

1905
A deed was filed in the county clerk’s office this morning in which Clara Driscoll transferred the Alamo property to the State of Texas in consideration
of $65,000. The property is described as follows: The Hugo & Schmeltzer property, formerly a part of the old Alamo mission and adjoining the Alamo church property now owned by the state. The property Is bounded on the north by Houston street, east by the Alamo ditch, south by the Alamo
and Alamo plaza and west by Alamo plaza.

1957
Television station KONO (Channel 12) has completed all arrangements to put all the Cleveland Browns’ professional football games on the air in San Antonio this fall, according to Bob Roth, commercial manager. The first telecast of 11 Sunday afternoon games will be Sept. 29 when the Browns meet the champion New York Giants.

1980
Playland Park closes for the winter and signs are put up promising the usual St. Patrick’s Day reopening the following year.  Unfortunately, owner Jimmy Johnson decides not to reopen and a legendary San Antonio amusement park passes into history.

1986
The legal drinking age in Texas is raised from 19 to 21, resulting in the layoffs of 70 workers at the Lone Star Brewery and 25 workers at the Pearl Brewing Company.

August 24 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Joske’s places this ad listing all the items that officers will need in the Army Training Camps.

1957
A drastic Army economy program today consigned Camp Stanley ammunition storage installation to mothballs. Camp Stanley, originally known as Camp Funston and located north of Leon Springs was established in 1917 for infantry training.

1989
Queen Latifah plays La Villita Assembly Hall

July 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Adjutant General Hutchings at noon today announced the list of divisions and the quota of men that must be furnished by each county or division under the draft act. The total quota for the state of Texas is 30,545 which is split up among the various divisions. Under the allotment as announced, San Antonio must furnish 151 men to the new army while Bexar county, outside of San Antonio, will be called upon for 238 men.

1957
Gasoline prices dropped today to 18 cents a gallon in the recent gas war. Drivers are cheering but station owners wear long faces.

1992
James Taylor plays a concert at Sea World of Texas.

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Subscriptions for the purchase of the ancient governor’s palace, a relic of the royal government of Spain, which stands on Military Plaza and which is in danger of being torn down, are beginning to be received by the committee working for its preservation, Miss Adina De Zavala, chairman. A regular plan of campaign has not been decided upon, but a meeting of the executive and advisory
committees will be held at some time next week, the time and place to be announced later. This building is one of the oldest structures in San Antonio and was erected by the Spanish government
as the administrative palace when Texas was a province of Spain. In spite of disfiguring signs and years of neglect and abuse, the building has a commanding appearance and the ancient seal of Spain still remains over the door.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas.  The law would be repealed two years later, on March 16, 1956.

1957
Bill Doggett and his combo, featuring San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, play Woodlake Country Club.

April 19 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1917wake_up_america
Less than two weeks after the U.S. declares war on Germany, New York’s Mayor’s Committee on National Defense began planning a national recruiting event, called “Wake Up America Day,” to be held less than two weeks later, on Thursday, April 19, the anniversary of the battle at Lexington and Concord. By April 10, six governors and 80 mayors in 36 states had signed on. Cities across the country planned parades, meetings and demonstrations, along with midnight church bells and horseback-riding messengers dressed as Paul Revere trotting through the streets. In Manhattan, Miss Jean Earl Moehle played the part of the well-known patriot.  Unfortunately, the patriotism failed to spur an increase in recruiting and a draft was instituted in May.

1957
San Antonio oilman Tom Slick was quoted from Katamandu, Nepal, as saying his exploring party had found three sets of mysterious tracks which he is convinced were made by the fabled “Abominable Snowman” of the Himalayas.

1985
A set of twins, the first children in the world to be born as a result of the gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) method, are born in San Antonio at Methodist Hospital.

1991
Longtime album-oriented rock station 99.5 KISS changes formats and begins simulcasting the 50’s and 60’s oldies format of 930 KOOL AM.  Eight full-time and part-time disc jockeys are fired as a result.  Reaction from listeners is swift and harsh.

April 11 in San Antonio history…

1917
A spectacular moving picture depicting Texas history from the sixteenth century to the present time and including the great mobilization of the National Guard on the Mexican border will be made in San Antonio and shown as a part of the two-hundredth anniversary of the anniversary of the Alamo in the spring of 1918. The title of the film will be “The Battle Ground of Nations.”

1957
The “Brackenridge Eagle” miniature train begins operation in Brackenridge Park.  This is a “soft opening.”  35,000 passengers will ride the train before the grand opening is held on June 14.

1966
Artists from the ABC TV show “Where the Action Is” play Municipal Auditorium.  The roster includes: Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Paul Revere & the Raiders, Linda Scott, Steve Alaimo, Keith Allison, The Action Kids, The Knickerbockers, Billy Joe Royal and The Viceroys

March 3 in San Antonio history…

1957
To avert the threat of a bus strike, a new fare structure goes into effect today and the sale of bus tokens is eliminated.  Outstanding tokens will continue to be honored until March 15.

1976randolph
The world-famous “Taj Mahal” at Randolph Air Force Base (right) is now an official state historical landmark.

1986
The Sears building on Romana Plaza closes.  It will be razed, rebuilt and opened in 1995 as the San Antonio Central Library.

February 4 in San Antonio history…

1949
City workers have finished installing the first three mercury vapor lights in San Antonio along Houston Street near the Medical Arts building.  The new lights generate about 10,000 lumens or four times as much brightness as current lights.  The workmen should finish the installation of 50 lights along Houston from the fire station to Santa Rosa Hospital in March.

1957
Today at 2 p.m. is the deadline for bids for the concession to own and operate pedal craft boats on he San Antonio river in Brackenridge Park.  The contract will be for one year beginning March 1, 1957.

2003napkin
Astronaut and Ohio Senator John Glenn speaks at Trinity University.