Blog Archives

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Subscriptions for the purchase of the ancient governor’s palace, a relic of the royal government of Spain, which stands on Military Plaza and which is in danger of being torn down, are beginning to be received by the committee working for its preservation, Miss Adina De Zavala, chairman. A regular plan of campaign has not been decided upon, but a meeting of the executive and advisory
committees will be held at some time next week, the time and place to be announced later. This building is one of the oldest structures in San Antonio and was erected by the Spanish government
as the administrative palace when Texas was a province of Spain. In spite of disfiguring signs and years of neglect and abuse, the building has a commanding appearance and the ancient seal of Spain still remains over the door.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas.  The law would be repealed two years later, on March 16, 1956.

1957
Bill Doggett and his combo, featuring San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, play Woodlake Country Club.

April 19 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1917wake_up_america
Less than two weeks after the U.S. declares war on Germany, New York’s Mayor’s Committee on National Defense began planning a national recruiting event, called “Wake Up America Day,” to be held less than two weeks later, on Thursday, April 19, the anniversary of the battle at Lexington and Concord. By April 10, six governors and 80 mayors in 36 states had signed on. Cities across the country planned parades, meetings and demonstrations, along with midnight church bells and horseback-riding messengers dressed as Paul Revere trotting through the streets. In Manhattan, Miss Jean Earl Moehle played the part of the well-known patriot.  Unfortunately, the patriotism failed to spur an increase in recruiting and a draft was instituted in May.

1957
San Antonio oilman Tom Slick was quoted from Katamandu, Nepal, as saying his exploring party had found three sets of mysterious tracks which he is convinced were made by the fabled “Abominable Snowman” of the Himalayas.

1985
A set of twins, the first children in the world to be born as a result of the gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) method, are born in San Antonio at Methodist Hospital.

1991
Longtime album-oriented rock station 99.5 KISS changes formats and begins simulcasting the 50’s and 60’s oldies format of 930 KOOL AM.  Eight full-time and part-time disc jockeys are fired as a result.  Reaction from listeners is swift and harsh.

April 11 in San Antonio history…

1917
A spectacular moving picture depicting Texas history from the sixteenth century to the present time and including the great mobilization of the National Guard on the Mexican border will be made in San Antonio and shown as a part of the two-hundredth anniversary of the anniversary of the Alamo in the spring of 1918. The title of the film will be “The Battle Ground of Nations.”

1957
The “Brackenridge Eagle” miniature train begins operation in Brackenridge Park.  This is a “soft opening.”  35,000 passengers will ride the train before the grand opening is held on June 14.

1966
Artists from the ABC TV show “Where the Action Is” play Municipal Auditorium.  The roster includes: Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Paul Revere & the Raiders, Linda Scott, Steve Alaimo, Keith Allison, The Action Kids, The Knickerbockers, Billy Joe Royal and The Viceroys

March 3 in San Antonio history…

1957
To avert the threat of a bus strike, a new fare structure goes into effect today and the sale of bus tokens is eliminated.  Outstanding tokens will continue to be honored until March 15.

1976randolph
The world-famous “Taj Mahal” at Randolph Air Force Base (right) is now an official state historical landmark.

1986
The Sears building on Romana Plaza closes.  It will be razed, rebuilt and opened in 1995 as the San Antonio Central Library.

February 4 in San Antonio history…

1949
City workers have finished installing the first three mercury vapor lights in San Antonio along Houston Street near the Medical Arts building.  The new lights generate about 10,000 lumens or four times as much brightness as current lights.  The workmen should finish the installation of 50 lights along Houston from the fire station to Santa Rosa Hospital in March.

1957
Today at 2 p.m. is the deadline for bids for the concession to own and operate pedal craft boats on he San Antonio river in Brackenridge Park.  The contract will be for one year beginning March 1, 1957.

2003napkin
Astronaut and Ohio Senator John Glenn speaks at Trinity University.

January 21 in San Antonio history…

1924Sousa_1924
John Phillip Sousa, the King of the Marches, brings his 100-piece band for a concert in Beethoven Hall.

1957
KONO-TV Channel 12 (later KSAT) begins regular programming with Eisenhower’s second inauguration.

2003 & 2006
Two San Antonio hotels hold grand openings on this date:  Hotel Valencia in 2003 and Hotel Contessa in 2006.

January 11 in San Antonio history…

1916
Brackenridge High School reachs an all-time high enrollment record of 490 students.

1954>January 11 in San Antonio history...
San Antonio today mourned the death of one of its most prominent citizens. Edgar Tobin, WWI flying ace, who with 11 other persons was killed yesterday in a Louisiana plane crash while returning from a hunting trip.

1957
Eighty county jail prisoners, objecting that their breakfast toast was toasted only on one side, staged an hour-long demonstration.Sheriff Owen Kilday quelled the disturbance quickly.

January 7 in San Antonio history…

1928
Establishment near San Antonio of the “West Point of the Air Corps,” a great flying school from which all flyers must graduate before winning their rating as army pilots, was practically assured today with the introduction of the James Bill in Congress. Site for the field is 15 miles east of the city.

1955
The London Festival Ballet, under the artistic direction of Anton Dolin, performs in San Antonio.

1957
Commissioner Albert Pena Jr. termed a proposed plan to fingerprint all county employees a “fundamental invasion of privacy and it violation of civil liberties.”

November 23 in San Antonio history…

1936
Legendary bluesman Robert Johnson records eight songs during the first of three recording sessions in San Antonio. The songs include “Sweet Home Chicago”, “I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom” and “Terraplane Blues.”

1957
For the first time in at least six years, snow fell on San Antonio today for several hours, leaving the city under a beautiful blanket of white.

1966
The Wonder Theater opens at Wonderland Shopping City showing “Not With My Wife You Don’t.”

October 15 in San Antonio history…

1955
Local television station WOAI Channel 4 begins broadcasting in color from its studios today.  WOAI is the sixteenth station in the world to be equipped to telecast live local color programs.  The station has invested $500,000 in new equipment and construction to facilitate color broadcasting.  The WOAI-TV color system is compatible with black and white so that all viewers without color televisions will be able to view the broadcasts in monochrome.

1957
Contractor Joe Joeris of San Antonio was the low bidder on the contract for Highlands High School with a bid of $2,159,600.  The school will be built to hold 2,400 students and is scheduled to be ready by the fall of 1958.

2014
The Eagles bring their “History of the Eagles” tour to the SBC Center.  Sadly, it will be the last appearance in San Antonio for the band.  Founding member Glenn Frey passed away on January 18, 2016.