Blog Archives

May 11 in San Antonio history…

1738
The cornerstone of San Fernando Cathedral is laid.

1918
The governor today issued a proclamation officially designating next Sunday, May 13, as “Mother’s Day” in Texas.  The people are urged to observe this day in a proper manner.  “May I not suggest that an acute, tangible reminder of our remembrance of our mothers be given to her upon this happy day, in the form of a gift, or a visit or a long letter?” says the governor in his proclamation.  A pure white flower should be worn on this day.

1966
“Tower of the Americas”, the name suggested by Rosa Gonzalez of Corpus Christi, is chosen as the official name of the 622-foot tall HemisFair tower. Ms. Gonzalez won a three-day expenses-paid stay at the Menger Hotel for herself and her immediate family, a $100 savings bond and a season pass to HemisFair. The names chosen as runners-up were: Hemispire, Hemistower, Astroshaft, Astrospire, Astrotower, Stratospire, Spire of the Americas and Tower of Peace.

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April 1 in San Antonio history…

1936
Texas drivers, for the first time in history today, were required to have a license for operating a motor vehicle.

1945
The Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro League, battle Charlie “Cholly” Engle’s All-Star team in a 14-inning thriller that ends up being called as a 4-4 tie.  The Monarchs had to catch a bus for Houston.  The Monarchs have a new shortstop by the name of Jackie Robinson who, unfortunately, has a double error in the seventh inning, allowing the All-Stars to score the tying run.

1966
First Lady Mrs. Lyndon Johnson is the special guest for the Fiesta de las Luminarias river parade and flips the switch on a new $11,000 aesthetic lighting system along the route.  She also plants an elm tree seedling behind the Villita Assembly Building.  It is from the elm planted on the White House grounds by John Quincy Adams in 1826.

March 24 in San Antonio history…

1924
City Council granted the I.&G.N. Railroad permission to erect a roundhouse on propety abutting on W. Commerce.

1966
The groundbreaking is held for the South Texas Medical School and Bexar County Teaching Hospital (later renamed The University of Texas Health Science Center and University Hospital.)

2011
Arlo Guthrie performs at Floore’s Country Store in Helotes.

February 18 in San Antonio history…

1966
Maury Maverick Jr. helps to unveil the new historical marker on the east side of the Frost Bank Building on Commerce Street.  The marker marks the site of the surrender of Union forces in Texas in 1861.

1983
Townes Van Zandt plays the Beauregard on South Alamo.

1986
The San Antonio Spurs’ Alvin Robertson becomes the second player in NBA history to record a quadruple-double with 20 points, 11 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against the Phoenix Suns.  The Spurs win, 120-114.  Robertson remains the only player to set the mark with double figures in steals instead of blocks.

December 22 in San Antonio history…

1896
Queen Liliuokalani, of the Hawaiian Islands, passes through San Antonio on her way to Boston.

1966
The City Council today approved a contract for the construction of a 622-foot tower for HemisFair 1968 and sold $5.5 million in bonds to pay for the structure.

1967
The final pre-cast and furnished room (of 496) is flown into place on the 20th floor of the Palacio Del Rio Hotel.  Placement of the last room was scheduled for January 5, but H. B. Zachry’s crews became so adept at hoising the 35-ton concrete rooms the “last flight” was moved up.

November 8 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The German armistice delegation has received the surrender terms from Marshal Foch and they have been given 72 hours to decide whether the terms should be accepted or rejected, expiring at 11:00 am French time, Monday, November 11.

1966
Texas finally votes to abolish the poll tax for state and local elections. The poll tax had been abolished for federal elections in 1964.

1977
San Antonio voters establish the creation of a Metropolitan Transit Authority (VIA) in San Antonio.

July 12 in San Antonio history…

1911
Lt. Benjamin D. Foulois, Signal Corps, has been ordered from San Antonio to Washington for work in connection with the aero squadron. It is his opinion that the aeroplane will be left here and another army aviator will be ordered here.

1918 – World War I
Second Lieutenant John J. Ryan, National Guard, formerly on duty with the 305th Cavalry Regiment at Camp Stanley, has been sentenced to a dishonorable discharge and five years in prison, following his conviction before a court-martial, of unlawfully marrying.  The officer was married in Chicago, October 12, 1915 and without procuring a divorce and while his first wife was living, married another woman at Waco, April 1, 1918.  He pleaded guilty to the charge.

1966
Architects unveiled before the HemisFair executive committee completed designs and scale-model photographs of the proposed Institute of Texan Cultures.

May 11 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
One of the captive observation balloons at Camp John H. Wise, four miles north of downtown, snapped the cable connecting it with the automobile truck, designed to control it, at noon today and shot skyward, bearing the two cadet officers who were in the basket.  Almost instantly, it was lost to the clouds and no trace of it was seen until it landed at Pflugerville, near Austin, three hours later.

1918
The governor today issued a proclamation officially designating next Sunday, May 13, as “Mother’s Day” in Texas.  The people are urged to observe this day in a proper manner.  “May I not suggest that an acute, tangible reminder of our remembrance of our mothers be given to her upon this happy day, in the form of a gift, or a visit or a long letter?” says the governor in his proclamation.  A pure white flower should be worn on this day.

1966
“Tower of the Americas”, the name suggested by Rosa Gonzalez of Corpus Christi, is chosen as the official name of the 622-foot tall HemisFair tower. Ms. Gonzalez won a three-day expenses-paid stay at the Menger Hotel for herself and her immediate family, a $100 savings bond and a season pass to HemisFair. The names chosen as runners-up were: Hemispire, Hemistower, Astroshaft, Astrospire, Astrotower, Stratospire, Spire of the Americas and Tower of Peace.

 

April 30 in San Antonio history…

1884
The City Brewery (Pearl) holds its grand opening.

1918 – World War I
Sergeant First Class Edward D. Terrell, quartermaster department, on duty at the auxiliary remount station adjoining Camp Travis, was drowned in the Salado Creek near Old Aviation Post yesterday.  He was attempting to cross the stream on horseback and his mount stumbled against a railing of the bridge and was swept down by the swift current resulting from the heavy rain received yesterday morning.

1966
The contract to build a 650-foot tower at the HemisFair site was awarded today to D.J. Rheiner Construction Company.  Architectural details for the unnamed tower will be released within 60 days.

January 12 in San Antonio history…

1943
The Hertzberg Circus Collection debuts at the San Antonio Public Library.

1966
“Batman,” starring Adam West and Burt Ward, premieres on KONO-TV Channel 12 at 6:30 p.m. opposite “The Virginian” and “Lost in Space.”

1985 – SNOW!
Just after midnight, it began to snow in San Antonio.  It snowed all night and most of the next day, finally dropping a record 13 inches of the white stuff on the Alamo City.  The previous record was 4.7 inches on January 30, 1949.