Blog Archives

October 13 in San Antonio history…

1896
The big chandelier in the rotunda of the Menger Hotel was swung into position. The 700-pound article, containing 3,000 pieces of prismatic glass, cost $300.

1966
The City Council today passed a resolution setting a public hearing on the proposal for the city to participate in the financing of a $5.75 million “Tower of the Americas” on the HemisFair site.

1971
A live rock concert, “Rex Foster with Don and Merrily” is broadcast from the KLRN studios and simulcast on radio stations KEXL in San Antonio and KHFI in Austin.  It is the first time that the stereo radio and television technique has been used in two cities at once.

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October 7 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Brigadier generals, colonels, majors, captains and lieutenants, old and young were included in a hard drilling which Maj. J. H. Kohler, master physical instructor at West Point, conducted at Camp Travis this morning.  More than 1,225 officers participated in the setting up exercise which loosened up stiff joins and set their blood to tingling.

1966
HemisFair President Marshall Steves today hailed congressional passage of the $7.5 million fair bill as “unquestionably, the most significant single development in our history to date.”

1982
Noise To Go, featuring Nick Lowe and Paul Carrack, plays the Bonham Exchange.  Claude Morgan & the Blast open the show.

 

August 5 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Plans for the “Joffre Tribute,” which will be given in San Antonio August 18, are now being made by the San Antonio committee for the Fatherless Children of France. The plans tor the day include a children’s parade which will assemble at 8:20 in the morning at the post office and march through the streets. The children will then give the day to selling French flags and the Lalique medals, especially designed by a distinguished French artist for this work.

1955
The 21st annual North-South All-Star high school football game is held in Alamo Stadium as the culminating event of the week-long Texas High School Coaches’ Association meeting held in the Alamo City.  The North team is coached by Mississippi State head coach, Darrell Royal, and the South is coached by Baylor University’s George Sauer.  The game ends in a 25-25 tie.

1966
Five unidentified flying objects, UFOs, were reported last night over the Alamo Heights area. A resident claimed that five separate aircraft of amber color appeared, going north to south.

June 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
If San Antonio wishes to retain its prominence as a center of military activities it must undergo a thorough vice clean-up, according to a statement made today by Raymond Fosdick, chairman of the War Department committee on training camp activities. Unless this is done San Antonio will lose its prospects of being designated as a site for one of the big training camps. Going even further than that, Mr. Fosdick said that Leon Springs and Fort Sam Houston would be stripped of everything but physical property unless the demands were complied with. If the clean-up is made, San Antonio will retain its army activities and these will be added to materially.

1963
The San Antonio Public Library’s Westfall branch library opens.

1966
City Council decided today to hold a referendum on whether the city’s water should be fluoridated and selected July 9 as the election date.  The action came after City Clerk Jake Inselmann told the council a petition calling on the council to either rescind its April 7 fluoridation ordinance or call an election met all legal requirements.

May 27 in San Antonio history…

1966
Comprehensive plans for a $10 million federal pavilion at HemisFair 1968 in San Antonio have been approved by President Johnson and legislation has been introduced in Congress for an appropriation.

1977
Smokey and the Bandit premiered in San Antonio at the North Star and South Park Mall theaters.

1988
B.J. “Red” McCombs buys the San Antonio Spurs from Angelo Drossos for $47 million.  “I’m ecstatic,” says Mayor Henry Cisneros.  “The Spurs are in the hands of a San Antonian and that’s the most important thing.”

May 16 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
According to W. A. Davis, state registrar of vital statistics in Austin, based on the 1910 Census, San Antonio has more men eligible for the national army than any other city in Texas (right).

1964
The Beach Boys make their first San Antonio appearance with a concert in Municipal Auditorium.  Other acts on the bill are:  Barbara Lynn, Little Johnny Taylor, Bob Hayden and the Marksmen and Dawn Six and the Rel-Yeas.

1966
Anti-fluoride forces today presented stacks of petitions to the city clerk’s office calling for an election on whether or not fluoride should be added to the city’s water supply. Stephen Harvasty, chairman of the Committee to Protect the Public Health, said the petitions contain 21,950 signatures. Ten city employees will work overtime from 5 to 8 p.m. nightly checking the petitions. If they are certified as effective by the clerk, the council then has 30 days in which to repeal the fluoridation ordinance or call a referendum on the issue.

May 11 in San Antonio history

1738
The cornerstone of San Fernando Cathedral is laid.

1917 – World War I
Five divisions of the National Guard and one division of the National Army, as the men taken into service under the selective draft bill will be known, are to be trained in the Southern Department under the order received at headquarters of the department late yesterday afternoon. One of the divisions, not yet designated, will be stationed at Camp Wilson and w ill have a strength of 26,000 men.

1966
“Tower of the Americas”, the name suggested by Rosa Gonzalez of Corpus Christi, is chosen as the official name of the 622-foot tall HemisFair tower. Ms. Gonzalez won a three-day expenses-paid stay at the Menger Hotel for herself and her immediate family, a $100 savings bond and a season pass to HemisFair. The names chosen as runners-up were: Hemispire, Hemistower, Astroshaft, Astrospire, Astrotower, Stratospire, Spire of the Americas and Tower of Peace.

April 11 in San Antonio history…

1917
A spectacular moving picture depicting Texas history from the sixteenth century to the present time and including the great mobilization of the National Guard on the Mexican border will be made in San Antonio and shown as a part of the two-hundredth anniversary of the anniversary of the Alamo in the spring of 1918. The title of the film will be “The Battle Ground of Nations.”

1957
The “Brackenridge Eagle” miniature train begins operation in Brackenridge Park.  This is a “soft opening.”  35,000 passengers will ride the train before the grand opening is held on June 14.

1966
Artists from the ABC TV show “Where the Action Is” play Municipal Auditorium.  The roster includes: Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Paul Revere & the Raiders, Linda Scott, Steve Alaimo, Keith Allison, The Action Kids, The Knickerbockers, Billy Joe Royal and The Viceroys

April 8 in San Antonio history…

1888
The first league baseball game is played in San Antonio.

1917 – World War I
Confederate veterans living in San Antonio have written to President Wilson assuring him of their loyalty to “our beloved land” and offering their services in any way in which they can be used. The letter, bearing the signature “W. H. Robert and others,” follows: “The Confederate Veterans of this city realize that there is a crisis in the affairs of our beloved land and we are willing to do anything that is in our power to aid in this time of need, as readily as we did over half a century ago with the same patriotism as in years gone by.”

1966
President Johnson signs the Medicare registration extension bill in ceremonies at Victoria Plaza located at 411 Barrera Street and attends Good Friday services here in San Antonio also.

April 7 in San Antonio history…

1914
Hundreds of extras stormed the walls in a movie reenactment of the Battle of the Alamo as throngs of San Antonians looked on from roofs of nearby buildings.  (This is the 1914 film “The Siege and Fall of the Alamo.”)

World War I – April 7, 1917
A young man who unknowingly sat on an American flag at a recruiting office this morning, found himself suddenly jerked to his feet by Chief Evans, who witnessed it.  The Light reported, “The astonished youth, ignorant of the great respect for the flag paid by sailors, received in silence a verbal lashing that impressed him with the fact that the nation’s ensign must be respected by all.”
“I didn’t know I was doing it,” was his explanation.  “I just sat down without looking to see what was on the chair.”

1966
In a 5-3 vote, City Council approves adding fluoride to the city’s water supply.  Anti-fluoridationist Stephen Harvasty vows to launch a campaign for a referendum.  A petition with at least 11,340 signatures would force the council to repeal the ordinance or force a referendum.