Blog Archives

January 24 in San Antonio history…

1905
The State Legislature passed a bill to purchase the Alamo for a historic shrine for $65,000.

1918 – World War I
Garments furnished by the Red Cross may now be worn by soldiers and officers without fear of violating the rules of Camp Travis.  The adjutant of the army has given out the following information:  “The wearing of woolen garments furnished by the Red  Cross, or by private individuals, is authorized when necessary on account of climatic conditions.  If the clothing furnished by the Government is not sufficient, the garments may also be worn.”

1938
Demolishing of the old markethouse on Market Plaza started today.  After the 37-year old structure is razed, construction will begin on a new $168,981 markethouse.  It will be one story of brick and concrete.

 

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January 22 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Some San Antonio businesses have been ignoring or refusing to obey the orders of the government regarding special lighting reductions on Sunday and Thursday nights.  Further failure to obey this law will be followed by prosecutions, including up to a fine of $5000 or a penitentiary sentence of one year.

1973
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson is transported by airplane from his Johnson City ranch to Brooke Army General Hospital where he is pronounced dead on arrival.

1978
About 100 people under five feet tall marched in the cold from HemisFair Plaza to City Hall to protest the prejudice of Randy Newman’s song “Short People.”  The “Puny People Protest Parade” was staged by radio station KTSA.

January 21 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Cadet Frank L. Seery of Evanston, Ill. was instantly killed and Cadet V. C. Dunham of Rochester, N. Y., received injuries from which he died an hour and a half later, in a collision of airplanes at Kelly Field at 10 a.m. this morning.

1984
USAA dedicates their new Federal Savings Bank under construction. It is due to open Summer 1985.

1999solo
Sixty-three years after Isadore Brenner opened the store as “Brenner’s” on Soledad Street, longtime San Antonio discount store Solo Serve files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

January 20 in San Antonio history…

1908
John Crivelli, the fireman who was injured on January 3, when a hose cart in which he was riding overturned on Alamo Street, died this afternoon in  the City Hospital.  Immediately after the accident, he was removed to Santa Rosa Hospital and remained there until about a week ago when he was moved to City Hospital.  The hopes for his recovery were slight at all times but owing to his strong constitution the attending physicians thought he might pull through.

1918 – World War I
Valuable army records were burned with approximately $10,000 in losses when fire destroyed the headquarters building of the student officers’ reserve training school at Camp Stanley.  The fire originated from a stove in the telephone exchange office at about 4:30 a.m.  The camp telephone exchange building was also destroyed and the camp cut off from telephone communications.

1988
The Express-News reports that financially strapped Antonian College Preparatory School, an all-boys Catholic high school, may be admitting girls next fall if Archbishop Flores gives his OK.  Flores should make a decision on the plan by early January, said Brother Peter A. Pontolillo, superintendent of schools for the archdiocese.  A decision on a proposal to make Holy Cross High School co-educational was also postponed until January.

January 16 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The battery of field artillery that fired the first American shot against the Germans was commanded by a San Antonio officer, Captain Ralph Heard, according to letters received in San Antonio from members of the expeditionary force.  A French .75 was the weapon used.  Captain Heard is the son of Col. J. W. Heard, of the regular army and was graduated from San Antonio High School with honors in 1915.

1920
Prohibition as directed by the 18th Amendment takes effect tonight at midnight.

1928
Bluebonnet HotelThe Bluebonnet Hotel at St. Mary’s and Pecan streets opens for business.

 

January 14 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
A plan of reorganization, that makes Kelly Field into an even more efficient machine for converting recruit units into trained aero squadrons, was put into operation at the field this morning.  By it, the first training brigade will receive the men as they arrive off the train, test them for trades and organize them into squadrons.  In the second training brigade, they will be given intensive training, and as the call comes for men overseas, they will be sent from the camp completely equipped and trained.

1974
San Antonio drivers are dismayed as the speed limit drops to the federally-mandated 55 mph at one minute after midnight.  The limit will remain at the “double-nickel” until Congress lifted all federal speed limit controls in the November 28, 1995, National Highway Designation Act, returning all speed limit determination authority to the states effective December 8, 1995.

2010
The Balcones Heights shopping mall built as Wonderland Mall in 1960, renamed Crossroads Mall in 1987, changes its name again to “Wonderland of the Americas.”

January 11 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The charges of laxity in enforcing the laws against vice made against Police Chief Lancaster in the hearing conducted before the city commission yesterday were sustained and the chief was reinstated by unanimous voted of the mayor and commissioners this morning.

1954>January 11 in San Antonio history...
San Antonio today mourned the death of one of its most prominent citizens. Edgar Tobin, WWI flying ace, who with 11 other persons was killed yesterday in a Louisiana plane crash while returning from a hunting trip.

1973
San Antonio receives a snowfall officially measured by the National Weather Service at less than one inch but there are accumulations of two and a half inches in some areas.

January 10 in San Antonio history…

1901
The telephone booth placed on the south end of Alamo Plaza by the hackmen was removed yesterday in compliance with the order of the council.

1918 – World War I
Approximately 15,000 books are now at the service of the men of Camp Travis, according to J. F. Marson, librarian of the Camp Travis Library.  The library, which was erected by the American Library Association, is still waiting on equipment to enable it to function at full capacity.  In the meantime, books are being distributed by the YMCA along with the library in camp.

1954Express & News
The staffs of the San Antonio Express (morning) and San Antonio News (afternoon) publish their first combined paper, the San Antonio Express & News Sunday Edition.  The two newspapers will officially merge 30 years later, in 1984.

January 9 in San Antonio history…

1889
Demolition begins on the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 324 Soledad. The church was the first Protestant church in the city, dedicated in 1853 as the Paine Methodist Episcopal Church.

1890
The cornerstone is laid for the new Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

1918 – World War I
The color line has been drawn at the third officer’s reserve training school, Camp Stanley, as to quarters, mess and instruction.  Negro student officers will be quartered in barracks separate from the whites, will be given separate mess and will be instructed separately.  Their quarters will be just as comfortable, their mess just as good and their instruction just as efficient as that given the white students.

January 8 in San Antonio history…

1900
In a brief telegram authorized by Mr. Andrew Carnegie, directed to Mrs. D. F. Ainsworth, president of the San Antonio Public Library; Mr. Carnegie offers to give the sum of $50,000 for the establishment of a library here, provided the city will supply an isolated site for a building and $5,000 yearly for the maintenance of the institution. The formal proposition embodying the conditions usually imposed by Mr. Carnegie in such cases has been forwarded by mail and may be expected soon.

World War I – January 8, 1918:
On this day 1918, President Woodrow Wilson announced his Fourteen Points, which would serve as the basis for peace in November 1918. With the Fourteen Points, Wilson sought to break the will of the Central Powers to fight by promising a just peace that would guarantee national independence and self-determination for all peoples involved in the war.

1986eastwood
The legendary Eastwood Country Club on San Antonio’s East Side is destroyed by fire.  Eastwood hosted many legendary performers through the years, such as Etta James, the Drifters, Bo Diddley, Bobby Blue Bland, Fats Domino, Bill Doggett, Jimmy Reed, Ike and Tina Turner and, of course, Miss Wiggles. (Photo from the San Antonio Register.)