Blog Archives

August 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
As a testimonial of their confidence in his ability and the ultimate success of the expedition he has led to France, the San Antonio Rotary club will send a signed message to General John J. Pershing, in command of the American forces Europe. General Pershing is an honorary member of the San Antonio organization.  Part of the message follows:
“Your selection as commander of the American army in France is a  matter of great pride to all Rotarians, especially to those of the club in San Antonio. We rejoice in every honor which comes to you. We eagerly follow your actions in the great war and await your achievements in absolute confidence. We are keeping the choicest place at our table and in our hearts for your happy return.
Respectfully and sincerely,
YOUR FELLOW ROTARIANS

1935
Mayor C. K. Quin today ordered a series of mural paintings taken from the walls of the foyer of the Municipal Auditorium, after their presence was protested by the American Legion Central Council of Bexar County. The paintings by Xavier Gonzales, were criticized for containing hidden Communist symbols.

2010
City Council passes a smoking ordinance that closes exemptions that have allowed smoking in bars, pool and bingo halls, comedy clubs and restaurants with enclosed smoking areas. The ordinance goes into effect on August 19, 2011.

August 18 in San Antonio history…

1813
The Spanish royalist army under Gen. Joaquín de Arredondo is victorious at the Battle of Medina south of San Antonio. Gen. Arredondo’s forces enter San Antonio two days after the battle and inflict punishment on the civilian population. 700 of the citizens are imprisoned, eighteen die of suffocation out of 300 in one house; the remainder are shot.

1917 – World War I
One hundred tons of food a day will be required to feed the 46,000 men of the National Army who will be mobilized at Camp Travis in September. That is the estimate given out by Capt. J. H . Dickey of the School for Bakers and Cooks at Fort Sam Houston.

1972
Trinity University ceases football scholarships

August 17 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Major General Henry Trueman Allen, assigned as commander of Camp Travis, is expected to report for duty about the middle of next week. General Allen is well known to many officers at the post, having been stationed at Fort Bliss, in this department, as colonel of the Thirteenth cavalry. No word has been received at Fort Sam Houston as to General Parker’s successor as department commander.

1956
The Edwards Aquifer reaches its lowest recorded level at 612.5 feet.

1980
Fleetwood Mac comes to the Convention Center to promote their new album “Tusk.”  Rocky Burnette, whose cousin Billy would join Fleetwood Mac in 1991, opened the show.

August 16 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
“So far as this office is concerned, saloons within half a mile of the Arsenal are closed and will remain closed for the duration of the war.” This was the comment made Wednesday at the office of the United States district attorney on efforts being made to reopen these saloons since the company of guardsmen at the Arsenal has been replaced with regulars.

1975
The San Antonio Express-News reports that the alligator gardens at Brackenridge Park will be closing within the next two weeks.  George Kimbrell, who captured the alligators himself and has operated the garden for the last 23 years, will donate the alligators to the Alligator Gardens of Hot Springs, Arkansas.

1977
San Antonians mourned the death of singer Elvis Presley, who died at age 42 at his home, Graceland, in Memphis, Tennessee.

August 14 in San Antonio history…

1895
Ground is broken for the main building of Our Lady of the Lake Academy.  Originally, the name was to be “St. Mary’s of the Lake” but Bishop Forest persuaded Mother Florence that there were so many St. Mary’s in San Antonio that another name might be more appropriate.  With that, the name was changed to Our Lady of the Lake.

1906
The S. A. and A. P. railroad will run a spur line to the 17,000-acre target range and maneuver ground, near Leon Springs, which the government has recently been acquiring. In event of any practice at this place there will then be ample facilities for the trans­portation of troops. The “Sap’s” engineer is now at work figuring out the route, and it is expected the work on the short line will be begun at an early date.

1917 – World War I
Colonel Malvern-Hill Barnum, chief of staff of the Southern Department of the Army, made the announcement today that the name Camp Kelly, used informally for years, is now officially Kelly Field.  The government is designating all its aviation posts as fields and not camps, so Camp Kelly must go.

August 12 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The cantonment buildings at Camp Travis will be finished and ready for occupancy August 25, six days ahead of schedule, thus probably shattering the world’s record for this class of construction, according to an official telegram sent to the War Department by Major George E. Thorne and Thomas A. Carr, representing, respectively, the government and the Stone & Webster Company. Although one of the three largest of the sixteen cantonments under construction throughout the country, it will be the first to be completed, thus winning a race against time in which all the contractors were contestants.

1922
Frost Bank moves into its new multistory “skyscraper” at the SW corner of Commerce and Flores streets (now the Municipal Plaza Building.)

1927
“Wings”, a silent World War I epic filmed in San Antonio, premieres in New York.  The movie stars Clara Bow and Buddy Rogers and features the (brief) film debut of Gary Cooper.  The next year, “Wings” will be the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture.

 

 

August 11 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The war of the Cibolo River is at an end. With the spectacular clash  between the Red and the Blue forces of Camp Funston student officers in the trenches of the Fifty-seventh In­fantry Friday night, four days of gruelling mimic warfare for the stu­dents was brought to a close.

1922
San Antonio’s second radio station (WCAR) begins broadcasting from 324 N. Navarro St. It is later renamed KTSA. (License date 5/9/22)

1939
Bexar County Commissioners Court in a special resolution passed this morning, censured the city of San Antonio for its “ill-advised” granting of a permit for a Communist Party meeting in the Municipal Auditorium.

August 10 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Car [streetcar] service between Camp Kelly and the city will be inaugurated Sunday morning by the operation of a shuttle service from the end of the Collins Garden line to the edge of the military reservation. The Public Service Company plans to maintain half hour schedules between the aviation post and the city car line for the present, and later shorten the schedule as the traffic may demand.

1982
Duval County rancher Clinton Manges and his lawyer, Pat Maloney, purchase the San Antonio Bulls franchise of the American Football Association.  They are looking to buy the San Antonio Spurs basketball team.  Team owner and CEO Angelo Drossos says the Spurs are “not for sale at any price” but later says he would entertain a “legitimate” offer with the understanding that the team would remain in San Antonio.

2011
Merle Haggard makes his penultimate San Antonio appearance at the Majestic Theater.

August 9 in San Antonio history…

1898
The pictures of some of San Antonio’s prominent citizens will be shown in Riverside Park in the Edison picture machine, as well as others, among which is the Battleship Texas.

1902
A real estate deed was filed this morning for the conveyance of the old Andrews homestead on Dallas for the Physicians and Surgeons Hospitals for $11,000.

1917 – World War I
Governors of the various states today received notice from Provost Marshal General Crowder that the first one-third of the quota of 687,000 men drafted for service in the national army will be called to the colors September 1, and sent to training camps before September 5. More than 200,000 will be called into service in the first increment, bringing the country’s total military forces up to one million men.

August 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With only two days remaining before the close of the whirlwind campaign for the $10,000 War Recreation Fund, members of the San Antonio Rotary Club will “get busy and busier’’ to raise the money. Though the reports at today’s luncheon, which was held at the Menger Hotel, were not as gratifying
as those of Tuesday, there is no discouragement, but rather a determination to win out in the end.

1956
A man who threatened to blow up the Bexar County National Bank with nitroglycerine escaped with $2,000 in a daring daylight holdup today.

1987
The doors close for the final time on the downtown Joske’s store to prepare for a storewide renovation and transformation into Dillard’s.