Author Archives: sapltexana

April 28 in San Antonio history…

1945
The Kansas City Monarchs play the second game of a two-game series with the Cincinnati-Indianapolis Clowns in a Negro League matchup at Tech Field today.  The Clowns win again, 8-4.

1958San Antonio Express, 29 April 1953
Two tornadoes (later rated F3 and F4) strike Bexar County in the area of Helotes, killing two people and injuring twenty.

1960
Joske’s closes the Chuckwagon and Camelia Room restaurants when African-American customers ask for service there.

April 27 in San Antonio history…

1914
The City Council gives authority to the Scientific Society to establish a zoological garden in Brackenridge Park.  This is the beginning of the San Antonio Zoo.

1956body_snatchers
The Texas Theater begins showing the sci-fi double feature of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Atomic Man (right).”

1979
During the Battle of Flowers parade, Ira Attebury sprays the crowd with shotgun and semiautomatic rifle fire from a parked motorhome. Two die, 55 are wounded. Attebury commits suicide as SWAT teams close in.

April 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The taking of the first American prisoner of war was reported to the American embassy today through the American consul at Glasgow.

1933burnett
Carol Creighton Burnett is born in San Antonio, near W. Commerce and Rosillo streets.

1956
Segregation was ended on San Antonio buses in line with a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

April 25 in San Antonio history…

1831
On April 23, 1831, Bowie and Ursula Veramendi, daughter of provincial Governor Don Juan Martin Veramendi, were married. Upon appearing before the mayor of San Antonio, he pledged to pay Ursula a dowry of $15,000. Bowie claimed his age as 32 (he was actually 35), and the value of his properties at $222,800. That was greatly exaggerated relying on over valuation of property in Arkansas and Louisiana, and included some money still owed him.
In fact, Bowie had to borrow over $2,500 from his in-laws for a honeymoon trip to New Orleans and Natchez, Louisiana. After the honeymoon, Jim and Ursula Bowie settled in San Antonio.

1917 – World War I
The selective service conscription bill is expected to pass the house.  If so, the next week will begin the organization of a conscription system.

1990srv
Stevie Ray Vaughan (right) and Double Trouble play La Semana Alegre in Hemisfair Park.  He enjoys it so much, he vows to return in 1991.  Sadly, he will not get the chance.  He dies in a helicopter crash four months later.  (Photo by Al Rendon)

April 24 in San Antonio history…

1891battle_flowers1891
The first Battle of Flowers parade is held (right).

1948
The first Fiesta Flambeau parade is held in San Antonio.

1994
David Robinson scores 71 points against the Los Angeles Clippers to win the NBA scoring title over Shaquille O’Neal.  Robinson and George Gervin are the only Spurs players to win scoring titles.

April 23 in San Antonio history…

1883
The Alamo church building is bought by the State under an Act of April 23, for $20,000, from the Catholic church authorities.

1917
The citizens of Boerne witnessed the first aeroplane flying over this town today when John Frost of San Antonio flew over Boerne about 5 o ’clock, making a detour of the city twice, going almost out of sight and then coming down to about 250 feet near the main street.  He continued on toward Comfort and then turned to head back to his home in San Antonio.

1981
Brooke Shields comes to Dillard’s in Ingram Park Mall to promote her new collection of jeanswear.

April 22 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With mock ceremony and great noise, and laugh-provoking buffoonery, after the passing of a pageant which was the worthy successor of the S. O. S. V. parade  of last year, King St. Vitus and Queen Loco were “crowned” last night on the special stage on Alamo Plaza. King St. Vitus appeared in the person of Edward Raymond and his fair consort was personified by Charles W. Fichtner, round, jolly, but quarrelsome. Bevies of court attaches. Hawaiian dancers, minstrels, buglers and royal personages lent an air of burlesque stateliness that was humorous in the extreme.

1908
A much improved and beautifully terraced Electric Park opened for the season last night. Everything was newly painted and spick and span. A Ferris wheel, largest in the South, has been added to the amusements.

1982
RepublicBank receives a permit from city council to demolish the Texas Theater.  The Conservation Society receives a federal court order to delay the demolition for 60 days.

April 21 in San Antonio history…

1889
Juan N. Seguin, in a letter to General Bee of this city, positively asserts that the charred bones and ashes of the Alamo defenders, burned by Santa Anna’s orders, were collected in an urn and deposited in a grave which the Seguin had dug inside of the cathedral of San Fernando, in front of the altar close to the railing.(from the April 21, 1889 San Antonio Light newspaper)

1917 – World War I
Maj. Gen. John J. Pershing, commander of the Southern Department, will speak tonight at the big mass meeting called at the Grand Opera House for the purpose of placing San Antonio on record as advocating President Wilson ’s universal military service plan.

1987mopac
The refurbished copper Indian is returned to his place atop the old Missouri Pacific depot downtown.  Castroville blacksmith Alan Lewis restored the Indian after it was found battered and bent in a nearby field when vandals removed it five years ago.

April 20 in San Antonio history…

1891
President Benjamin Harrison visits San Antonio during the inaugural Fiesta San Jacinto. He is the first President to visit the Alamo City.

1974
Chet Atkins performs at Convention Center Banquet Hall.

1986
Former Dallas Cowboy wide receiver, Drew Pearson, turns in his resignation as weekend sportscaster on KENS-TV.  “He felt he couldn’t devote the time necessary to become a top-flight sports anchor,” Gary DeLaune explained after substituting for Pearson on the 5 p.m. news.

April 19 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1917wake_up_america
Less than two weeks after the U.S. declares war on Germany, New York’s Mayor’s Committee on National Defense began planning a national recruiting event, called “Wake Up America Day,” to be held less than two weeks later, on Thursday, April 19, the anniversary of the battle at Lexington and Concord. By April 10, six governors and 80 mayors in 36 states had signed on. Cities across the country planned parades, meetings and demonstrations, along with midnight church bells and horseback-riding messengers dressed as Paul Revere trotting through the streets. In Manhattan, Miss Jean Earl Moehle played the part of the well-known patriot.  Unfortunately, the patriotism failed to spur an increase in recruiting and a draft was instituted in May.

1957
San Antonio oilman Tom Slick was quoted from Katamandu, Nepal, as saying his exploring party had found three sets of mysterious tracks which he is convinced were made by the fabled “Abominable Snowman” of the Himalayas.

1985
A set of twins, the first children in the world to be born as a result of the gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) method, are born in San Antonio at Methodist Hospital.

1991
Longtime album-oriented rock station 99.5 KISS changes formats and begins simulcasting the 50’s and 60’s oldies format of 930 KOOL AM.  Eight full-time and part-time disc jockeys are fired as a result.  Reaction from listeners is swift and harsh.