Author Archives: sapltexana

October 16 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
An order is issued this morning that, beginning tomorrow, married men at Camp Travis who show no symptoms of influenza will be issued passes twice a week to come into San Antonio and see their families.  The rumor that the quarantine is lifted is declared to be “absolutely without formulation” by Major Van Meter, acting division surgeon.

1929
The City Central Bank today will join the ranks of the very few buildings in San Antonio which are equipped with new dial telephones. By 1931, the entire city is expected to be using dial phones.

1977
San Antonio is plunged into darkness at 7:08 p.m. when the city suffers a blackout due to a succession of errors by City Public Service.  The diesel generators installed after the last city blackout in 1949 fail to kick in. The area affected is larger than Rhode Island.  Ironically, after New York City had suffered a blackout earlier in the year on July 14, CPS spokesman Ben Scholl said, “The chances of San Antonio having an earthquake are greater than the chance the city will have a blackout similar to the one in New York.”

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October 15 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
President Wilson replies to Germany that unconditional surrender is the only acceptable solution to end the war.

1951Lucy_15Oct1951
“I Love Lucy” premieres at 7:00 p.m. on WOAI-TV (right).

1955
Local television station WOAI Channel 4 begins broadcasting in color from its studios today.  WOAI is the sixteenth station in the world to be equipped to telecast live local color programs.  The station has invested $500,000 in new equipment and construction to facilitate color broadcasting.  The WOAI-TV color system is compatible with black and white so that all viewers without color televisions will be able to view the broadcasts in monochrome.

October 14 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light reports that great events are “moving swiftly behind the veil of diplomatic secrecy toward the formulation of President Wilson’s next move in answer to Germany’s peace plea.”

1956elvis_1956
Elvis Presley with his band, Scotty Moore, Bill Black and D.J. Fontana,  played two shows at the Bexar County Coliseum to thousands of swooning, screaming, mainly female, fans.  It was the third appearance for Elvis in San Antonio in 1956. (photo from the Institute of Texan Cultures San Antonio Light Collection.)

1980
The Spurs kick off their season against their new division rival Kansas City Kings.  With the addition of the Dallas Mavericks to the NBA, the Spurs move from the Central Division of the Eastern Conference to the Midwest Division of the Western Conference.  The division also includes the Houston Rockets, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets and Utah Jazz.

October 13 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The demand for the San Antonio Light is so great, due to the news of a possible German surrender in the near future, that many Sunday newspapers are sold without the usual comics and supplements which were printed two days earlier.  The editors of the Light apologize and ask for understanding.

1923
The circus is in town!  Ringling Bros. – Barnum & Bailey circus makes its annual visit to the Alamo City.

1975
The Ace in the Hole band, featuring singer George Strait, plays their first concert – just up the road at Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos.

October 12 in San Antonio history…

1916
San Antonians looked forward to the next day’s football clash between the University of Texas and Oklahoma A&M to be held locally.

1918 – World War I
A dispatch has been received from Berlin that reports acceptance of President Wilson’s peace terms from earlier this week.  It is interpreted by officials that this does not mean the end of the war and it is expected that Germany will make a counterdemand.

1960
Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy makes a campaign stop in San Antonio. Kennedy tells the crowd gathered in front of the Alamo, “In 1960, the cause of all mankind is the cause of all Americans.”

October 11 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The Red Cross has put out an urgent call for women to fill the central work rooms and make at once 400 pneumonia jackets for army hospitals.  Any woman who can sew is urged to come.  If she does not have a nursing cap, she must bring a large white handkerchief or a small towel to cover her hair, and must wear a clean white shirtwaist or white dress, if she has no white apron to slip over her frock.  She is also asked to bring her own needle, scissors and thimble.

1937
San Antonio’s new federal building and post office opens on Alamo Plaza.  Ralph Cameron, a San Antonian, was architect and A. W Kutsch and Sons of Detroit were general contractors. The contract price was $1,768.510.93 but with extras which included features of the building cut out of the original plans and replaced, total cost of the building when entirely completed will aggregate approximately $2,225,000.

2007
San Antonio City Council votes to purchase the Mission Drive-In property for $3.2 million and redevelop the site for a multi-use complex which includes a public library.

October 10 in San Antonio history…

1912
Butter Krust bread is first placed on the market by Richter’s Steam Bakery. (right)

1918 – World War I
Five deaths from broncho-pneumonia following influenza were reported at Camp Travis for the 24 hours ending at 8 o’clock this morning.  A total of 736 new influenza cases developed at the camp within the last 24 hours and 160 of pneumonia as a combination from influenza were reported.  This brings the total number of pneumonia cases at the camp to 467 since the disease started.

1972
National Bank of Commerce installs the city’s first automatic teller machine (ATM).

October 9 in San Antonio history…

1918
Manager Sidney Weis of the Grand Opera House received a telegram this morning stating that the road tour of the all-star cast presenting “Out There” has been abandoned for the present time on account of the prevalence of influenza in Texas cities.  “Out There” was billed for Thursday, Friday and Saturday appearances at the Grand.

1955
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s Circus performs under the big top in San Antonio for the last time.  All future performances will be in existing coliseums and stadiums.

1962
Hanger 14, a wooden aircraft hangar constructed at Brooks Field in 1917, catches fire and burns to the ground.  Six fire units, three from Brooks and three from San Antonio, fought the blaze on the structure.  There were several explosions when high-pressure oxygen tanks and blank 20-mm ejection seat shells were set off by the fire.

 

October 8 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Ending with his sensational “Slide to Death” from the eight-story Alamo National Bank building, Johnny Reynolds, the “human fly,” will put on the most spectacular free show of the week tonight at 8 o’clock in the interest of the Liberty Loan.

1929
“It’s the greatest thing since sliced bread!”
Richter’s Bakery begins advertising sliced Butter Krust bread along with the traditionally unsliced loaves.

1998
Janet Jackson brings her “Velvet Rope Tour” to the Alamodome, featuring an up-and-coming star in Usher Raymond.

October 7 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light reports that First Lieut. J. Montgomery Fly, an officer of Company B, 350th Infantry, of San Antonio was killed in action in France on Sept. 13.  He was married to Miss Dorothy Dibrell in September of 1917.  Lt. Fly was 30 years old.

1944
The Randolph Field Ramblers, a football team shaped from former college stars stationed at the base, give the Texas Longhorns their worst home defeat in history (up to that point), winning 42-6.

1992
President George H. W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari all flew to San Antonio and looked on today as their three trade ministers signed documents signaling an end to negotiations for the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. “This meeting marks a turning point in the history of our three countries,” Bush told about 200 dignitaries and local business leaders packed into a courtyard at the Plaza San Antonio Hotel. “We are creating the largest, richest and most productive market in the entire world.”