Blog Archives

September 16 in San Antonio history…

1889
The cornerstone is laid for City Hall in Military Plaza (Plaza de Armas.)

1930
The Prospect Hill library opens at 1 p.m. today at 2322 Buena Vista. Mrs. Mary Walthall will be the librarian at the branch.  The library will be open every day except Sundays from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

2005
The Shops at La Cantera, a new mall located on 1604 West near Interstate 10, opens today.

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May 6 in San Antonio history…

1884
The Grenet Alamo property is sold for $40,200 to Hugo & Schmeltzer (right).

1889
The Hugo & Schmeltzer property on Alamo Plaza is condemned by City Council.

1987
Singer-songwriter Townes Van Zandt plays the Leon Springs Cafe.

April 21 in San Antonio history…

1889
Juan N. Seguin, in a letter to General Bee of this city, positively asserts that the charred bones and ashes of the Alamo defenders, burned by Santa Anna’s orders, were collected in an urn and deposited in a grave which the Seguin had dug inside of the cathedral of San Fernando, in front of the altar close to the railing.(from the April 21, 1889 San Antonio Light newspaper)

1941
King Antonio XXIII, George Friedrich, directs his armada of more than 50 boats down the San Antonio River in the first ever Fiesta River Fête.  This replaces the previous tradition of King Antonio arriving in the city by royal coach.  The ceremony also serves as a formal dedication of the River Beautification Project.

1987mopac
The refurbished copper Indian is returned to his place atop the old Missouri Pacific depot downtown.  Castroville blacksmith Alan Lewis restored the Indian after it was found battered and bent in a nearby field when vandals removed it five years ago.

February 22 in San Antonio history…

1885
U.S. Marshal Hal Gosling of San Antonio is shot to death by a bandit on a train south of New Braunfels.

1889
The San Antonio City Brewery will shortly put on the market their excellent XXX Pearl beer.  Orders are in already for the first output.

1910
Louis Paulhan, “King of the Air,” flew his aeroplane over the city today.  He attained an altitude of 2,500 feet flying from Kirby to San Antonio and return, a distance of 18 miles in 21 minutes.
[This was the first airplane flight in Texas.  Benjamin Foulois made the second, and the first military flight, on March 2, 1910]

December 16 in San Antonio history…

1937
The new electric blanket, which maintains a comfortable temperature in the bed at the approximate cost of four cents a night for electricity, is being introduced here by Joske’s.

1938
Robert H. H. Hugman is named the official architect of the River Beautification Project.

1989
Alan Jackson makes his first-ever San Antonio appearance at Bluebonnet Palace in Selma.  His debut album Here In The Real World would be released two months later, in February 1990.

 

September 16 in San Antonio history…

1889
The cornerstone is laid for City Hall in Military Plaza (Plaza de Armas.)

1918 – World War I
“Clean Up Week,” a six-day clean up and salvage campaign, begins today all across Texas.  Mayor Bell has asked all San Antonians to reclaim all materials that might be salvaged and to assist the city in tidying up and improving sanitary conditions.

1930
The Prospect Hill library has its grand opening at 1 p.m. today at 2322 Buena Vista. Mrs. Mary Walthall will be the librarian at the branch.  The library will be open every day except Sundays from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

May 6 in San Antonio history…

1884
The Grenet Alamo property is sold for $40,200 to Hugo & Schmeltzer.

1889
The Hugo & Schmeltzer property on Alamo Plaza is condemned by City Council.

1918 – World War I
Prominently placed in the Carnegie Library is an exhibit arranged by the food administration, which has engaged the attention of everyone coming into the library.  A delicately browned muffin, made of corn and rice flour is shown under a glass cover, while in small glass jars are samples of corn, rice, yellow corn, potatoes and cottonseed flours.  Conservation recipes collected by the United States food administration have been printed in book form and are available on the lending list of the library’s books.

March 27 in San Antonio history…

1889
The paving of Alamo Plaza with mesquite blocks is begun.

1918 – World War I
Within an hour after reporting the theft of his Ford roadster, G. A. Turner, 409 Pecan Street, found the car at Commerce and Alamo Streets.  It was being driven by an instructor in aviation at Kelly Field, who said he had purchased the car last Sunday night for $200.

1965
The Express-News prints this article about the Peter, Paul and Mary concert at Trinity University the day before yesterday (March 25):
“Peter, Paul and Mary showed up 45 minutes late for their Trinity U. performance Thursday night. They were in Montgomery, Ala., involved in civil rights doings, and landed at International Airport at 8:20 p.m. The show was set for 8 p.m. But that would have been fine with everybody if the trio, instead of sticking to song (for which they were excruciatingly well paid), hadn’t ad-libbed through a lot of emotional stuff about Alabama. The big crowd didn’t dig it at all…”

February 22 in San Antonio history…

1889
The San Antonio City Brewery will shortly put on the market their excellent XXX Pearl beer.  Orders are in already for the first output.

1918 – World War I
San Antonians had their first real opportunity to “size up” the soldiers of the Nineteenth Division when more than 20,000 Camp Travis men marched through the residential and business streets of the city this morning in a parade observance of Washington’s birthday.

1944
A San Antonian waited in line two hours at the Federal Building to pay his income tax but balked when a seaman attemped to fingerprint him and enlist him in the Navy. He was in the wrong line.

January 9 in San Antonio history…

1889
Demolition begins on the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 324 Soledad. The church was the first Protestant church in the city, dedicated in 1853 as the Paine Methodist Episcopal Church.

1890
The cornerstone is laid for the new Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

1918 – World War I
The color line has been drawn at the third officer’s reserve training school, Camp Stanley, as to quarters, mess and instruction.  Negro student officers will be quartered in barracks separate from the whites, will be given separate mess and will be instructed separately.  Their quarters will be just as comfortable, their mess just as good and their instruction just as efficient as that given the white students.