Blog Archives

November 4 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Terms of an armistice under which the land and sea forces of what once was the Austro-Hungarian empire, have laid down their arms were announced today simultaneously in Washington and the allied capitals.

1986
Perry Como records his Christmas television special at the Lila Cockrell Theater from 6:45 to 8 p.m.  Formal attire is required.

1994
A fireworks and laser show before a Spurs game triggers a sensor on a water cannon in the Alamodome, unleashing a torrent of water that soaks hundreds of fans and delays the game for 50 minutes.  31 fans are injured in the scramble to dry ground and the Spurs lose to the Golden State Warriors, 123-118.

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October 31 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Austrian forces have requested terms for an armistice from the Italians, who have passed along the request to the Allies.  Turkey has surrendered unconditionally.

1913
Beethoven Hall. South Alamo street, San Antonio’s largest auditorium, was partially destroyed by a fire that broke out at 10:45 p.m. this evening. The building, valued at $40,000, suffered damages of $25,000, it was estimated today. The origin of the blaze has not yet been fully determined. Delay in sounding the alarm permitted the fire  to gain great headway, as members of the Beethoven Maennerchor in the club room did not heed cries of “fire,” believing practical jokers were intent on making them victims of a Hallowe’en prank.

1986
The new Marshall Field’s store and wing in North Star Mall are opened to the public today, with Mayor Henry Cisneros and actress Carol Burnett doing the ribbon-cutting honors.

October 29 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
One hundred recovered pneumonia patients were issued twenty day furloughs this morning at the Base Hospital, Ft. Sam Houston.  That shows the conditions at the Ft. Sam Houston hospital are steadily improving.

1929express
The Express-News dedicates its new building at the corner of Avenue E and 3rd streets (right).  The day is inauspicious due to the second day of panic selling on Wall Street.  The stock market crash reaches its crescendo today and will come to be known as “Black Tuesday.”

1986
Arthur “Hap” Veltman, an active developer of food and drink establishments and assorted commercial properties in San Antonio, says he has found a buyer for his holdings in a large downtown nightclub, the Bonham Exchange at 411 Bonham.  However, the San Antonio developer did not reveal who the buyer is.

August 29 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light features an advertisement for the Boys’ Working Reserve, a new program developed by the Department of Labor “to mobilize the boy power of the nation.”  Boys 16 to 21 years of age can enlist to work on farms for six weeks or so during the summer.

1960
Jerry Lee Lewis rocks the Cabaret club in Bandera, Texas.

1986
Blockbuster Video announces its first San Antonio location at 9885 IH-10 West in the Colonnade. They would acquire the Sound Warehouse and Music Plus retail chains in 1992, but declare bankruptcy on Sept. 23, 2010.

April 27 in San Antonio history…

1914
The City Council gives authority to the Scientific Society to establish a zoological garden in Brackenridge Park.  This is the beginning of the San Antonio Zoo.

1918 – World War I
H. S. Reed, a farmer, was taken from his home near Edinburg, fifteen miles north of McAllen today.  He was badly beaten and shot through the shoulder for allegedly refusing to subscribe for Liberty Bonds.  Reed refuses to talk and his assailants are unknown to police officers.

1986
The first heart transplant in San Antonio was performed by a team of surgeons from Medical Center Hospital and the UT Health Science Center.

April 10 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Camp Travis barracks buildings in which have been housed the “measles colony” of the camp soon will be relieved of the patients.  Col. I. W. Rand, commander of the camp hospital, said today that the measles patients would immediately be removed to the convalescent hospital wards just completed.  Until now, measles patients have been housed in quarantine barracks under armed guard, for lack of room to care for them in hospital buildings.

1986
The San Antonio Express reports that a demolition permit is being sought to raze the art deco-style Laurel Theater at 2310 San Pedro Avenue in the Monte Vista Historical District. City staff said the owner, Barshop Enterprises, wants to clear the land and has no other site plans. The request will go to the Historic Review Board.

1994
Tom and Ray Magliozzi, better known as “Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers,” bring their NPR “Car Talk” show to the Lila Cockrell Theater for a live broadcast.

March 31 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Daylight Saving time takes effect for the first time at 2 a.m.  “Before closing the store [tonight],” said Max Goodman of the Hertzberg Jewelry Company yesterday, “we will set forward our street clock, the clock in the window and six or seven large time pieces in the store.  The other watches and clocks will be allowed to run down.  Monday morning we will wind them all up again and set them to the new time.”

1980
A three-alarm fire rages through the walls and roof of the Texas Transportation Museum in Hemisfair Plaza, ruining the collection of Fiesta gowns, damaging stored European and Texas paintings and furniture, but leaving most of the museum’s priceless automobile collection miraculously unscathed.  Three of the 55 cars in the collection, said to be the tenth largest in the country, were destroyed: a 1962 Mercedes-Benz 300SL roadster, a 1940 American Bantam mini-car, and a 1957 Lotus racer, valued at a total of about $35,000 (about $108,000 in 2017 dollars).

1986
The Sears building on Romana Plaza closes.  It will be razed, rebuilt and opened in 1995 as the San Antonio Central Library.

March 3 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The number of cases of sickness at both the Fort Sam Houston and Camp Travis hospitals has greatly decreased in the past week.  Yesterday, there were 1,452 at Ft. Sam Houston, down from 1,680 a week ago.  The Camp Travis hospital had 1,606 patients plus 666 mumps cases in barracks.  There were 265 pneumonia cases, 11 meningitis, 55 influenza, 21 measles and other minor ailments.  This is a drop of nearly 30 percent from a week ago.

1968
President Johnson, accompanied by top brass and members of his cabinet, lifted the veil on the world’s largest airplane – the C-5A Galaxy – today in Marietta, Georgia.  The mammoth airplane, with President Johnson called “a new era in our nation’s strength,” will be maintained at the Kelly Air Force Base repair depot after it is put into service in June 1969.

1986
The Sears building on Romana Plaza closes.  It will be razed, rebuilt and opened in 1995 as the San Antonio Central Library.

January 30 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Owing to the prompt and efficient work of the Kelly Field fire department and the military police, the fire that broke out in general headquarters this morning was promptly extinguished with damage of not more than $500.

1958
A plan for a “hemisfair” – a world’s fair for Latin American countries and the U.S. – was being considered today.  A chamber of commerce committee decided to probe the possibility of having such a fair in 1960.

1986
Sculptor Lincoln Borglum, who completed his father Gutzon’s work on Mount Rushmore in 1941, is buried in City Cemetery #1.  Borglum died on January 27 in a Corpus Christi hospital.

January 8 in San Antonio history…

1900
In a brief telegram authorized by Mr. Andrew Carnegie, directed to Mrs. D. F. Ainsworth, president of the San Antonio Public Library; Mr. Carnegie offers to give the sum of $50,000 for the establishment of a library here, provided the city will supply an isolated site for a building and $5,000 yearly for the maintenance of the institution. The formal proposition embodying the conditions usually imposed by Mr. Carnegie in such cases has been forwarded by mail and may be expected soon.

World War I – January 8, 1918:
On this day 1918, President Woodrow Wilson announced his Fourteen Points, which would serve as the basis for peace in November 1918. With the Fourteen Points, Wilson sought to break the will of the Central Powers to fight by promising a just peace that would guarantee national independence and self-determination for all peoples involved in the war.

1986eastwood
The legendary Eastwood Country Club on San Antonio’s East Side is destroyed by fire.  Eastwood hosted many legendary performers through the years, such as Etta James, the Drifters, Bo Diddley, Bobby Blue Bland, Fats Domino, Bill Doggett, Jimmy Reed, Ike and Tina Turner and, of course, Miss Wiggles. (Photo from the San Antonio Register.)