Blog Archives

June 30 in San Antonio history…

1912
Hugo & Schmeltzer’s at 613-615 Commerce Street closes.

1918
The eight-story Rand Building at Houston and Soledad streets, has been sold by the owner, Ed Rand, to Pablo Gonzales Garza, known as the corn-milling king of Mexico for a sum of $650,000.  This is the largest single real estate deal ever conducted for a San Antonio business property.

2002
A storm system dumps six inches of rain on the Hill Country and up to ten inches in various places around South Texas. The rain persists for three days and causes San Antonio’s worst flooding since 1998.

Advertisements

June 27 in San Antonio history…

1886
A contract for the removal of the old buildings on Alamo Plaza at the site of the new opera house was about to be let.

1912
A new bunting flag was put up over the Alamo yesterday afternoon to replace the old cotton one which was tattered and torn. It has only been within the past few months that the Texas flag has waved over the Alamo. Heretofore, the United States flag was used.

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light reports that the assassination of Czar Nicolas II of Russia by Bolsheviks is “confirmed.” (The Czar was not assassinated until July 17).

May 30 in San Antonio history…

1912
The old Dullnig water tower, a landmark since 1884, is being torn down.  The structure towers 130 feet above the river bank just behind the Chandler building on Losoya St.

1918 – World War I
Nineteen men, most of whom were between the ages of 19 and 25 years old, were arrested yesterday afternoon and night, charged with being idlers.  With but four exceptions, those arraigned before the police court this morning were convicted, with fines ranging from ten to twenty-five dollars.

1924
Flowers were dropped from planes over Brooks Field in memory of Sidney J. Brooks, Jr., former reporter for The Light, for whom the airfield was named. Brooks was killed in a Kelly Field crash during WWI.

May 2 in San Antonio history…

1887
The chapel at the Concepcion Mission, as repaired, is rededicated to our Lady of Lourdes by Bishop Neraz.

1912
There is a possibility that the famous Scholz garden may be reestablished on a part of the property now occupied by the Wolff & Marx Co. when that firm’s lease expires.

1918 – World War I
Construction has been started on the Library at Kelly Field, this building being erected under the direction of the American Library Association.  It is stationed on the road to main headquarters Kelly No. 1, not far behind the post office building, off the Frio City Road.

December 10 in San Antonio history…

1835
At the Siege of Bexar, General Martin Perfecto de Cos, brother-in-law of Santa Anna, surrenders the city to General Burleson, commander of the Texian Army.

1912
The city’s first F.W. Woolworth & Co. store opens at the corner of  Houston & Alamo streets (right).

1917 – World War I
Five deaths from pneumonia occurred among Camp Travis soldiers yesterday and today, according to announcement at the office of the division sanitary inspector.  Four are from Texas and one from Oklahoma.

March 18 in San Antonio history….

1909cobb
The Detroit Tigers come to San Antonio for a spring training exhibition game against St. Louis College.  Tigers star slugger, Ty Cobb, is fanned by 17-year-old student Melvin “Bert” Gallia.  The Tigers win the game however, 10-2.  (Photo courtesy of St. Mary’s University.  Gallia, back row, far left.  Cobb, center, in white.)

1912
The explosion of a locomotive boiler at the roundhouse of the Southern Pacific Railway kills 26 and injures 40.

2005
UTSA plays their first baseball game at on-campus Roadrunner Field against the University of Louisiana-Monroe.

October 30 in San Antonio history…

1912StJohns_afterfire
A tragic fire at St. John’s Orphans Home (right), on the corner of San Saba and W. Houston Street, kills six nuns and three orphans.

1938
Radio station KTSA broadcasts “Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre” featuring a radio drama of H. G. Wells’ “War of the Worlds” from 7 to 8 p.m.  Despite announcements before, during and after the program, some frightened radio listeners believe it is a real invasion of aliens from Mars.

1953
Work has begun on the installation of a 300-ton air conditioning system in the Frost bank building.  The building should be fully air conditioned by next June.  In addition to the main unit, 334 individual room air conditioning units will be installed.

June 27 in San Antonio history…

1912
A new bunting flag was put up over the Alamo yesterday afternoon to replace the old cotton one which was tattered and torn. It has only been within the past few months that the Texas flag has waved over the Alamo. Heretofore, the United States flag was used.

1963
San Antonio moved again toward complete desegregation today after 173 restaurants, 23 motels and 9 hotels quietly opened their doors to African-Americans.

1988
Lightning strikes steeple of Hot Wells bathhouse causing extensive fire damage for the fourth time.

March 18 in San Antonio history…

1909
The Detroit Tigers come to San Antonio for a spring training exhibition game against St. Louis College.  Tigers star slugger, Ty Cobb, is fanned by 17-year-old student Melvin “Bert” Gallia.  The Tigers win the game however, 10-2.

1912
A boiler explosion at the roundhouse of the Southern Pacific Railway kills 26 people and injures 40.

1965
Peter, Paul & Mary play at concert at Sams Memorial Center at Trinity University.

February 9 in San Antonio history…

1912
”Ladies and gentlemen, there’s a fire next door. There’s no danger and I want all of you to file out just as orderly and quietly as possible.” When A. W. Nelson. manager of the Liberty Theater on East Houston Street made this announcement to a crowded house,, the audience seemed to rise simultaneously but all got out without as much as a scratch and the operator of the moving picture machine kept the pictures going on the screen until the last patron had cleared the front entrance.

1958
Airman Donald Farrell is sealed in a cramped steel chamber at the School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph AFB, to simulate a space flight. The air pressure is half of what it is at sea level and Airman Farrell cannot stand up nor lie down. His test lasts for seven days.

1967
San Antonio  inventor Don P. Dixon of San Antonio, Texas filed and was ultimately granted a patent for the first air conditioning units specifically designed for the VW Beetle, which are soon offered by US dealerships.  He opens DPD Manufacturing at 504 E. Josephine to produce these units.

1995
Bernard Harris, Jr., a 1974 graduate of San Antonio’s Sam Houston High School, becomes the first African-American to perform an EVA (spacewalk) during the second of his two flights aboard the Space Shuttle.