Blog Archives

January 6 in San Antonio history…

1912
The purchase of an automobile delivery car by Washer Bros. marks another step in the elimination of the horsedrawn vehicle as a means of bundle delivery in San Antonio.

1979
The 52-year-old Municipal Auditorium is gutted by fire. The cause of the blaze is attributed to a discarded cigarette.

1993
A team of 20 archaeologists digging in the now-drained San Antonio River believe they may have found up to 20 missing Alamo cannons.

October 31 in San Antonio history…

1913
Beethoven Hall. South Alamo street, San Antonio’s largest auditorium, was partially destroyed by a fire that broke out at 10:45 p.m. this evening. The building, valued at $40,000, suffered damages of $25,000, it was estimated today. The origin of the blaze has not yet been fully determined. Delay in sounding the alarm permitted the fire  to gain great headway, as members of the Beethoven Maennerchor in the club room did not heed cries of “fire,” believing practical jokers were intent on making them victims of a Hallowe’en prank.

1938
George Johnson, station manager, of KTSA reports in the San Antonio Light that received a call from an official at Fort Sam Houston who asked “what in the hell are you doing?” during last night’s broadcast of “War of the Worlds.”

1993
An artic cold front brings a record low temperature of 27 degrees to San Antonio and breaks a number of records. It is the earliest day in San Antonio history that the temperature has dropped into the 20’s.

October 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
The Ringling Brothers’ circus comes to San Antonio for the first time (right), arriving on the I. & G. N. railroad.  The parade came down the streets at 9:30 this morning and the show commenced at 1:00 p.m. in the seven-pole big top tent on the fair grounds.

1912
A tragic fire at St. John’s Orphans Home (right), on the corner of San Saba and W. Houston Street, kills six nuns and three orphans.

1938
Radio station KTSA broadcasts “Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre” featuring a radio drama of H. G. Wells’ “War of the Worlds” from 7 to 8 p.m (right).  Despite announcements before, during and after the program, some frightened radio listeners believe it is a real invasion of aliens from Mars.

October 10 in San Antonio history…

1912
Butter Krust bread is first placed on the market by Richter’s Steam Bakery.

1940
Gutzon Borglum’s monument to trail drivers is accepted by the Trail Driver’s Association.

1972
National Bank of Commerce installs the city’s first automatic teller machine (right).

July 9 in San Antonio history…

1912
San Antonio today paid its last respects to the late Mayor Bryan Callaghan. Thousands visited the Callaghan home on Crockett St., where the body lay in state, and viewed the features of the man who for nearly a score of years held the highest executive office in the Alamo City.

1946
The polio count climbs to 79 with three more admissions to Robert B. Green hospital, a 7-year-old boy, a 15-year-old boy and a 2 year-old girl.

2008
Crews begin cutting down nine live oaks on Houston Street today to make way for downtown’s first Embassy Suites.

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1912
A minimum temperature of 59 degrees was recorded at 7 o’clock this morning by the government thermometer in the Hicks Bidg. This was cooler than it has been in June since 1903. (This is still the record low.)

1946
Two more polio cases are reported in the city, bringing the total to 63.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas. At the same session, however, racial barriers are dropped at city golf courses and tennis courts.  The two councilmen who voted against the segregation ordinance were Emil Sherlen and Henry B. Gonzalez.

 

May 5 in San Antonio history…

1731
Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de Acuña is established.

1884
The Maverick Bank building (right), at the corner of Alamo Plaza and Houston Street, is begun.

1912
Little is left now of the collection of rock and adobe hovels which formerly encumbered the block bounded by Soledad, Veramendi, Houston and Main. They have been torn down to make room for the new Wolff & Marx.

March 18 in San Antonio history…

1909
The Detroit Tigers come to San Antonio for a spring training exhibition game against St. Louis College.  Tigers star slugger, Ty Cobb, is fanned by 17-year-old student Melvin “Bert” Gallia.  The Tigers win the game however, 10-2.

1912
A boiler explosion at the roundhouse of the Southern Pacific Railway kills 26 people and injures 40.

2005
UTSA plays their first baseball game at on-campus Roadrunner Field against the University of Louisiana-Monroe.

December 10 in San Antonio history…

1912
The city’s first F. W. Woolworth store opens at the southwest corner of Alamo and Houston Streets. (right)

1974
On the 25th anniversary of the station, WOAI-TV changes their call letters to KMOL.

1996
In a move widely criticized by Spurs fans, head coach Bob Hill is fired by general manager Gregg Popovich.   David Robinson, who played for the first time since Oct. 11, said he didn’t agree with Hill’s ouster.“But it’s not my decision to make,” said Robinson, now is playing for his seventh coach since 1989-90. “Bob and I never had any problems. I liked his love of winning. He was meticulous. He did a great job.” Popovich takes over as head coach and loses his first game, 93-76, to the Phoenix Suns.  The loss dropped the Spurs to 3-16 for the season.

October 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
The Ringling Brothers’ circus comes to San Antonio for the first time, arriving on the I. & G. N. railroad.  The parade came down the streets at 9:30 this morning and the show commenced at 1:00 p.m. in the seven-pole big top tent on the fair grounds.

1912StJohns_afterfire
A tragic fire at St. John’s Orphans Home (right), on the corner of San Saba and W. Houston Street, kills six nuns and three orphans.

1973
San Antonio river barges began full-circle tours of the Paseo del Rio loop today.  At a cost of $355,000, a Tainter gate was placed in the main channel, permitting access to the full loop.  Mayor Cockrell officiated at the ceremony opening the loop to river traffic.