Blog Archives

July 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
Iconoclast William Cowper Brann is fired as editor of the San Antonio Express newspaper.

1917 – World War I
Declaring that thousands of men of draft age evaded registration and have escaped the call to the army, Attorney General Gregory today instructed all United States attorneys to begin a round-up of the slackers and start criminal prosecutions.

1992
Foley’s department store opens in Rolling Oaks Mall.

December 23 in San Antonio history…

1820
Moses Austin arrives in San Antonio where he will meet with Mexican authorities to ask permission for 300 Anglo families to settle in Texas.

1894
The Hot Wells Hotel is consumed by fire. (It will burn three more times over the next 90 years.)

1903
San Antonio Police Officer Montez arrests Captain Jacobson of the Salvation Army for “appearing on the streets in disguise” as Santa Claus.  Captain Jacobson explained that he meant no disrespect to Santa but merely dressed like him to call attention to the fact that the Salvation Army is going to make a whole lot of poor people happy with a warm dinner on Christmas Day.  Capt. Jacobson was taken to the police station, however, and gave bond of $50 to appear before Recorder Shardein tomorrow morning.

September 6 in San Antonio history…

1894
San Antonio Female College opens its doors.  In 1916 the college was recognized by the University of Texas as a junior college. The name was changed to Westmoorland College in 1918 and to the University of San Antonio in 1937. In 1942 the institution passed out of Methodist control, and the University of San Antonio was merged with Trinity University.

1982
Betty Jean Alden’s controversial statue of Samuel Gompers is unveiled along Market Street.

1984
The San Antonio News publishes its final standalone issue.  Tomorrow, it will be merged with the Express to form the San Antonio Express-News newspaper.

July 4 in San Antonio history…

1894
An immense U.S. flag was draped from the balcony of San Antonio’s City Hall to mark the Fourth of July because it was too big to be raised on the city’s flagpole.

1937
Convinced her husband was cheating on her, an Austin woman leaps to her death from the eighth floor of the Bluebonnet Hotel.  Her suicide note ends with, “So long, Casanova.”

1978001
The Express and the News newspapers are combined for the day.

May 22 in San Antonio history…

1894
Burdett Green received a commission from Mayor Pascall making him the second negro police officer on San Antonio’s force.

1927
From a sick bed in the St. Anthony Hotel, Porter Adams, president of the National Aeronautical Association announced a reception and $25,000 was awaiting Charles A. Lindbergh when the flyer arrives back in the U.S.

1992
Fiesta Texas amusement park opens in northwest San Antonio.

March 6 in San Antonio history…

1836silent
The final assault on the Alamo begins at approximately 5:30 a.m. Mexican forces take huge losses but capture the compound, killing the last of the 187 defenders who had held out within the walls of the fortified mission for thirteen days.

1894
Fireman Edward W. Hargrove was on the second floor at the Sunset Hose Company when the alarm sounded. He dashed to slide down the pole to the fire wagon, missed and fell to the first floor, breaking his ankle.

1982
The Spurs give up a record 166 points to the Milwaukee Bucks in a triple-overtime game, but win by five.  George Gervin scores 50 points in the game.

December 23 in San Antonio history…

1894
The Hot Wells Hotel is consumed by fire. (It will burn three more times over the next 90 years.)

1933
San Antonio is host to royalty today. Louis Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia, second son of Crown Prince Wilhelm Frederick of Germany. The youthful member of the deposed Hohenzollern dynasty arrived at Winburn field in an American Airways plane at 4:45 o’clock yesterday afternoon, accompanied by Brig. Gen. Charles H. Danforth who met the prince at Brownsville. The prince, who is in the employ of the Ford Motor Company, has been in Mexico City for the past five weeks, and included San Antonio on his return trip schedule to Detroit.

1993
The William Cavender auto-dealer family buys Orsinger Buick.

September 6 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
American war correspondent James Archibald is searched in Great Britain  and is found to be carrying a letter from Constantin Theodor Dumba, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to the United States to the Minister for Foreign Affairs in Vienna. The letter describes a plan to delay the production of American munitions by a strike action. He is charged with performing an “unneutral service” and later released.

1894
San Antonio Female College opens its doors.  In 1916 the college was recognized by the University of Texas as a junior college. The name was changed to Westmoorland College in 1918 and to the University of San Antonio in 1937. In 1942 the institution passed out of Methodist control, and the University of San Antonio was merged with Trinity University.

1944
Ninety-three San Antonio liquor stores signed an agreement to close shop immediately when the Nazis surrender.

1983
The United States Football League holds their expansion draft for the San Antonio Gunslingers along with Jacksonville Bulls, Pittsburgh Maulers, Houston Gamblers, Oklahoma Outlaws and Memphis Showboats.

July 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
Iconoclast William Cowper Brann is fired as editor of the San Antonio Express newspaper.

1958
County Commissioners Court changed the name of Bexar County Coliseum to Joe Freeman Coliseum.  In changing the name of the building, members of the court noted that “through his untiring efforts and unslefish and liberal donations, Joe Freeman, an outstanding citizen of San Antonio and Bexar County, is responsible for a coliseum of which all Bexar County may be proud.”

1992
Foley’s department store opens in Rolling Oaks Mall.

September 6 in San Antonio history…

World War I -1914
The British fleet begins a bombardment of Cattaro, an Austro-Hungarian seaport.  Four American newspaper men wire the Associated Press to say that they have failed to substantiate any reports of alleged German atrocities toward prisoners or noncombatants.

1885
The first safe ever brought into Texas was on view at Meyer’s Palace on Alamo Plaza.

1894
San Antonio Female College opens its doors.  In 1916 the college was recognized by the University of Texas as a junior college. The name was changed to Westmoorland College in 1918 and to the University of San Antonio in 1937. In 1942 the institution passed out of Methodist control, and the University of San Antonio was merged with Trinity University.

1982
Betty Jean Alden’s controversial statue of Samuel Gompers is unveiled along Market Street.