July 27 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The control of preventable diseases in cities near army camps by Federal agents, assisted by men and women inspectors and the co-operation of local physicians, as a plan suggested to the authorities at Washington, was the subject of an interesting address led by Dr. W. B. Russ, at the luncheon meeting of the San Antonio Rotary Club today.

1961
A senate committee approved a bill which would close most Texas businesses on Sunday.

1973
Willie Nelson, Leon Russell, Johnny Bush, Sammi Smith, El Curro and Gino Scorza entertain at the Menudo World Championship held at Raymond Russell Park.

July 26 in San Antonio history…

1901
Firemen who saved the Maverick Bank Building from flames recently were treated to a Mexican supper last night by P. H. Swearingen, who has a drugstore on the first floor of the building.

1917 – World War I
A Camp Kelly soldier was sentenced to seven year’s hard labor for saying “I don’t like that damned fellow, Wilson.”

1981
The first jazz mass ever celebrated at a Catholic church in this area – and possibly in the entire Southwest – is held in San Fernando Cathedral.  Jim Cullum and the Happy Jazz Band provided their interpretations of hymns and spirituals to a 7:30 p.m. service conducted by Father Louis White.

July 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Adjutant General Hutchings at noon today announced the list of divisions and the quota of men that must be furnished by each county or division under the draft act. The total quota for the state of Texas is 30,545 which is split up among the various divisions. Under the allotment as announced, San Antonio must furnish 151 men to the new army while Bexar county, outside of San Antonio, will be called upon for 238 men.

1957
Gasoline prices dropped today to 18 cents a gallon in the recent gas war. Drivers are cheering but station owners wear long faces.

1992
James Taylor plays a concert at Sea World of Texas.

July 24 in San Antonio history…

1885
Track laying begins for the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad.

1917 – World War I
The $64,000,000 airplane bill became a law today with President Wilson’s signature.  More than 20,000 planes are to be built as a first increment and many thousands of aviators will be trained.

1956
Plans for a convention hall and civic center at La Villita were unveiled today by V. H. Braunig, City Public Service Board manager.

 

July 23 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
By executive order issued today President Wilson prohibited the existence of disorderly resorts or saloons within five miles of any military camp. Any town within such radius licensing saloon would not be affected but no saloon may be within a half mile of camps. Private persons living within five miles of such a camp may have liquors in their possession for personal use but may not give them to any soldier.

1978
Sanitation workers in San Antonio go on strike.  Tensions are inflamed when City Manager Tom Huebner states that, “Those positions are easily filled.”

1981Kens0583
KENS-TV Channel 5 breaks ground on new headquarters and studios at 5400 Fredericksburg Road.

July 22 in San Antonio history…

1916
The newest thing in the Army is a motorcycle radio section. It consists of the complete equipment of a field wireless carried on three sidecar motorcycles.

1917 – World War I
More than sixty dollars in pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and even dollars, were subscribed during the first week of the Happy Tribe Million Penny War Fund to aid the poor Belgian and Flemish children, and the Happy Tribe campaign was launched with every indication of the most complete success.

1972
“The Hardest Working Man in Show Business” – James Brown – performs with his band The J.B.’s in Municipal Auditorium.  Get on up!

July 21 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With the draft completed the formation of the National army now awaits the calling out of the quotas required from each registration district. It has been estimated that this will approximate 7 percent of the registration but certain allowances are to be made and each board will receive notice of the exact number of men it will be expected to supply.  It has been estimated that San Antonio and Bexar County will be required to furnish about 1,000 men in the National Army. This probably will be subject to some reduction as a credit for the volunteers obtained in this community but assuming that 1,000 is the number required each board will send out notices for just twice the number of its quota.

1976sa-san-antonio-toros-77519164
San Antonio’s 10-year experiment with minor league football ends as the Toros franchise folds.  The Toros played in the Texas League, the Continental and Trans-American leagues and amassed a 94-17 record.

1996
Gloria Estefan brings her “Destiny” tour to the Alamodome, two weeks before performing at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics closing ceremonies.

 

July 20 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The draft begins and the first five men drafted from San Antonio are:  Andres Perez, John Martinez, W. A. Shacklett, Philip Best and Lawrence Abernathy

1923
Pancho Villa is assassinated in Parral, Mexico.

1969
San Antonio, as well as the rest of the world, is awestruck watching Americans land on the moon.

July 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The newspapers report that the draft will begin tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. and 1,374,000 men nationwide will be called.

1943
The crew of the B-17 Flying Fortress “Memphis Belle” will tell the inside story of their 25 bombing missions at the war bond rally to be held in their honor at Municipal Auditorium tonight at 8:30 p.m.

July 18 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Today is “Penny Day” as proclaimed by the mayor. Children wishing to contribute to the fund may bring their pennies to the “Happy Tribe Editor” of The Light or may drop them in one of the collection boxes placed In a number of the city’s stores. The campaign will continue for three weeks and the money will then be sent to the Red Cross to be used for the children of Belgium. Father and mother have contributed to the Red Cross. Here is the children’s opportunity to do their mite for the relief work and the best part of it is their pennies w ill go to the relief of little folks entirely.

1920
A successful test of the ripcord parachute is made at Kelly Field.

1970
“The Great (Little) Train Robbery:” Passengers aboard Old No. 99 , Brackenridge Park’s miniature train, are robbed of their valuables by two soldiers from Ft. Sam Houston. Riders initially think it is a joke – until they see the guns are real. Both robbers are caught and sentenced to prison terms of 20 and 10 years, respectively.