New and improved website coming July 19!

New Website

A new fresh, more user-friendly and responsive mysapl.org is coming soon.  Key features on the new website include quicker and easier access to key services and resources including the digital library, ‘ask a librarian’, and the events calendar. The new site will also be responsive, and is designed for all your devices. Be sure to visit us on July 19 to check out our new look!

September 29 in San Antonio history…

1952vance_house
Workmen begin razing the Vance House at Nueva and Dwyer, despite protests from the Conservation Society.  The Vance House, a Greek Revival mansion,  was built between 1857 and 1859 by James Vance, a local banker. Col. Robert E. Lee, walking under the grape arbors on its grounds, was said to have decided to resign a colonelcy in the United States (Union) Army and join the Confederacy, though he was fundamentally opposed to rebellion.  Having made up his mind, he announced at a dinner in the Vance House’s great dining room:  “If Virginia secedes, I shall stand with her.”  Virginia seceded and Lee became the Commander of the Confederate armies.  The Federal Reserve Bank currently stands on the site. (photo from the UTSA Archives)

1955
San Antonio’s largest building, the Transit Tower, was sold to the Citizen’s Republic Insurance Company for $1 million.

1957
Rubber hoses are back at the county jail and prisoners will get “belted” by them if they complain about the food, so says Sheriff Owen Kilday who says “civil rights or no—these whips are back to stay.”

September 28 in San Antonio history…

1916
A new signal, an electric horn, which will warn pedestrians and vehicles of approaching fire-fighting apparatus, has been ordered on the recommendation of City Electrician Claude Convers and will be installed by him at the corner of Commerce and St. Mary’s streets. It will be operated on the Gamewell circuit and the moment a fire call is given, which will send fire motors from the central station northward on St. Mary’s street, this horn will begin sounding.  The sound, according to Mr. Convers, is unlike any sound now in use in the city and will be easily distinguishable.

1931calloway_1934
The City Central Bank and Trust, one of the larger banks in the city, closes by order of the State Banking Commission.  This sparks a “run” on another large bank in town – Frost Bank.  The president of NBC Bank instructs employees to accept no new accounts from those who had withdrawn their funds from Frost. “That’s a sound bank,” said president J. K. Baretta.  “If they’ll withdraw from Frost, they’ll do the same thing to us later.”

1934
Cab Calloway and his New York Cotton Club entertainers opened a week’s engagement at the Majestic Theater (right).

September 27 in San Antonio history…

18651st_issue
August Siemering and H. Pollmar begin publishing the San Antonio Express (right) as a weekly with a subscription price of $6 a year. It’s printed on the press of Siemering’s other paper, the German-language Freie Presse für Texas, in offices at 138 E. Commerce St. The paper is tabloid-size with five-column pages and advertising on the front. The first editor is Judge William E. “Fiery” Jones.

1868
The cornerstone of the newly renovated San Fernando Cathedral is laid.

1936
Stinson Field is dedicated.

September 23 in San Antonio history…

1929caveteria
The new underground restaurant in the Gunter Hotel – The Caveteria – opens today. (photo courtesy of the UTSA Zintgraff collection)

1960
North Star Mall opens at the corner of San Pedro and Loop 410.

1966
Former Brackenridge star Warren McVea catches a 99-yard touchdown pass for the Houston Cougars in their game against Washington State.  This is the first football game ever played on Astroturf and still the longest touchdown pass in University of Houston history.

 

September 21 in San Antonio history…

1946
Installation of a traffic signal light at Broadway and Pershing avenue to provide a safe crossing place for pedestrians to the north entrance of Brackenridge Park is being delayed by lack of cable, Commissioner P. L. Anderson stated today. As soon as the cable can be obtained the light will be installed and a concrete safety island for pedestrians will be plated in the street, he said. Some cable is being purchased in Houston and some in Corpus Christi.

1970
Monday Night Football debuts on the ABC network on KSAT Channel 12 at 8:00 p.m.  The game features the New York Jets with quarterback Joe Namath vs. the Cleveland Browns at Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium.  This is the first of 13 prime-time Monday games on the network this season. The Browns win, 31-21.

1978tc
Felix Stehling opens the first Taco Cabana restaurant at the corner of San Pedro and Hildebrand avenues (right).  It’s still there.

September 19 in San Antonio history…

1880
The first issue of the San Antonio Daily Times is published.  It takes over from the San Antonio Herald.

1947
San Antonio’s first recognized collegiate football team since the days of St. Mary’s Rattlers makes its opening appearance tonight as Trinity University faces Hardin-Simmons at Alamo Stadium

1983
A new $15 million-plus, high-rise Holiday Inn is now under construction near the junction of Interstates 10 & 410 on the city’s Northwest Side, it was announced today.  The 11-story hotel, due to be completed in January 1985, is being built by Safari Management in partnership with Tom E. Turner Co. and San Antonio attorney Jack Guenther.

 

September 16 in San Antonio history…

1889
The cornerstone is laid for City Hall in Military Plaza (Plaza de Armas.)

1930
The Prospect Hill library opens at 1 p.m. today at 2322 Buena Vista. Mrs. Mary Walthall will be the librarian at the branch.  The library will be open every day except Sundays from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

1963
John F. Kennedy High school opens.  It was slated to open on Sept.3 but was delayed due to a construction strike.

September 15 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1916British_Mark_I_Tank
The Battle of Flers–Courcelette, the third and final general offensive mounted by the British Army in the Battle of the Somme, begins.  This battle is notable for the debut of the new British Heavy Machine Gun Branch’s “secret weapon” – the tank.  (British Mark I shown at right)

1875
The first of two great hurricanes to hit the Texas port city of  Indianola come ashore.  When the damage is done, only eight buildings are left undamaged and fatalities are estimated at 150 to 300 dead.

1933
At 12:01 a.m., Prohibition ends.  Anheuser-Busch sends their brewery wagon and Clydesdale horse team to distribute the beer in downtown San Antonio.

1968
Two monorail trains collide at Hemisfair, killing one person and injuring 47.

September 14 in San Antonio history…

1851
The Catholic Ursuline Order of nuns opens the first school for girls in San Antonio.

1884
The first bell to peal a call to Protestant worship in San Antonio at Rev. Wesley DeVilbiss’ Paine Methodist Church (now Travis Park United Methodist) was given to the Church of Strangers on Tenth St.

1985
A Southern Pacific train derails on a trestle near Macdona and dumps 42,000 gallons of highly toxic sulfuric acid into the Medina River.  The acid wipes out much of the river’s fish.   Within a day of the spill, railway officials add lime to the river in a move to neutralize the acid but add too much and compound the problem.  State game and fish officials estimate the monetary loss of the fish alone at $119,808.40.

September 13 in San Antonio history…

1963
The Robert C. Cole Golden Cougars win their inaugural football game, 8-0, over the Comfort Bobcats.

1969
Hemisfair Arena hosts a concert with Tommy James and the Shondells, Houston-based The Clique, local favorites The Yellow Payges.

1987
Pope John Paul II visits San Antonio and gives a Mass for an estimated 350,000 people in Westover Hills on the site of what is today Stevens High School.  He also visits Plaza Guadalupe, Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, San Fernando Cathedral and Municipal Auditorium. (photo courtesy of the San Antonio Express-News)