Blog Archives

January 22 in San Antonio history…

1905
The City Health Board called for an ordinance prohibiting persons from spitting on streets and sidewalks.

1933
Only in chasing criminals or in answering emergency calls will radio patrol cars be allowed to exceed a speed limit of 25 miles per hour in the future, this according to an order issued today by Chief of Police Owen Kilday.

1940
San Antonio awakened today to see its first snowfall in 10 years.  At noon, the snow measured three inches.  San Antonio received its last heavy snowfall – 29.9 inches – Dec. 21, 1929.

November 26 in San Antonio history…

1877
John James dies at the age of 56.  He became Bexar County chief surveyor, surveying and establishing the city’s boundaries in 1846. He participated in the Battle of Salado in 1842 and in 1844 he surveyed and laid out the city of Castroville. In 1853, he and Charles de Montel established the city of Bandera and set up a horse-powered lumber mill there. He also established the first lumberyard in San Antonio and introduced Merino sheep to the Bandera area. In 1854, he and 35 others headed to California with more than 1,000 head of cattle. James also surveyed Fort Davis, Boerne, D’Hanis, and Quihi. He is said to have surveyed more land in Texas than any other individual surveyor. James was also the father-in-law of well known architect Alfred Giles.  Lastly, he was one of the three bondsmen who underwrote for the City of San Antonio the payment of $300,000 to the Galveston, Harrisburg, and San Antonio Railway Company on completion of the first railroad into San Antonio February 19, 1877.

1905
Two steam locomotives collide in a staged exhibition at the International Fairgrounds.  Unlike the Crash at Crush, the boilers do not explode and no one is harmed.  It is estimated that over 35,000 spectators witnessed the event.

1955
Duke Ellington and Nat “King” Cole (right) appear in person at the Majestic Theater for a special midnight showing of their new full-length motion picture “Rock ‘N’ Roll Revue.”  (photo from the UTSA Digital Photo Archives)

September 18 in San Antonio history…

1905
San Antonio was shown by the census to be the largest city in Texas, with a population of 59, 581.

1947
Advanced corrosion of the electrical wiring that controls the gates of the Olmos Dam was disclosed.  A routine check showed the wiring had almost disintegrated.

1986
Joint public TV stations KLRN-TV of San Antonio and KLRU-TV of Austin vote to split up and work toward operating independently.  Starting in October, each station will begin keeping its own books.

January 24 in San Antonio history…

1904
Firemen estimate losses at $200,000 in a fire which destroyed L. Wolfson’s clothing store on Main Plaza.  (It would be destroyed by fire again and for good on Oct. 1, 2011.)
(right, photo courtesy Maria Watson Pfeiffer)

1905
The State Legislature passed a bill to purchase the Alamo for a historic shrine for $65,000.

1953
Oscar Levant performs Gershwin’s “Concerto in F” and “Rhapsody in Blue” with the San Antonio Symphony at Municipal Auditorium.

 

November 11 in San Antonio history…

1905
Historical objects owned by the Daughters of the Texas Republic have been removed from the Alamo. The objects will not be returned until the shrine is returned to the custody of the organization.

1909 
Nucleus of a fund for erection of a monument to the heroes of the Alamo was started today by J.E. Webb when he donated $500 in the name of his son, J. E. Webb Jr., at a meeting at the fair.

1940
The Alamo Cenotaph is dedicated with festivities and an Armistice Day parade.

September 1 in San Antonio history…

1905
A deed was filed in the county clerk’s office this morning in which Clara Driscoll transferred the Alamo property to the State of Texas in consideration
of $65,000. The property is described as follows: The Hugo & Schmeltzer property, formerly a part of the old Alamo mission and adjoining the Alamo church property now owned by the state. The property Is bounded on the north by Houston street, east by the Alamo ditch, south by the Alamo and Alamo Plaza and west by Alamo Plaza.

1961
Texas, rich in natural resources, had gone 125 years without a sales tax, but finally joined 36 sisters states that have had the levy for up to 25 years or more.

1985
San Antonio merchants were happy as the 24-year old Texas Blue Laws were repealed today.  However, San Antonio drivers were annoyed as a mandatory seat belt law took effect.

August 22 in San Antonio history…

1905
According to the records in the office of the city engineer, there are 71 automobiles in San Antonio, representing a value of about $37,200.

1918
Military police have been ordered to keep soldiers out of close to a score of eating and drinking places in the carnival district of W. Houston because their women employees lack certificates attesting to their moral character.

1980
San Antonio Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela fans 15 batters in a 3-0 win over Amarillo.  The 19-year-old lefty allowed just two hits in the second half of the season and struck out 162 batters in 174 innings.

August 15 in San Antonio history…

1905
An ordinance was adopted by the city council wherein the city disclaimed any right, title or interest in the Alamo property.  The mayor was authorized to execute a quitclaim deed to Miss Clara Driscoll.

1945
While people took to the streets to celebrate Japan’s acceptance of surrender terms, effectively ending World War II, burglars ransacked houses and apartments left vacant by celebrants. A total of $425 in cash and numerous articles were reported missing.

1984
The San Pedro Drive-In closes.
(photo by Jim Miller)

August 3 in San Antonio history…

1883
The first issue of the San Antonio Light is published. (Originally published starting in 1881 as The Evening Light.)

1905
Mrs. Anson Jones and Mrs. C. H. Hilby of Houston, president and secretary of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, today formally transferred to the state all the interests on the society in the Alamo.  All legal requirements are satisfactory and the mission will be in full possession of the state by September 1.

1987
Miss Metroplex, Courtney Ann Gibbs, 20, is crowned Miss Texas-USA in the Municipal Auditorium.  The pageant is televised live to more than six million viewers statewide. Miss Bedford, Gretchen Polhemus, is second runner up and would not only win Miss Texas-USA two years later but go on to be crowned Miss USA.

July 16 in San Antonio history…

1905
Mrs. L. M. Lyon of 717 East Euclid Avenue wins the $50 prize for writing the city creed in 100 words:
“I believe in San Antonio, my home; that whatsoever I I give unto her shall be returned to me tenfold.
I believe in her unique and picturesque setting, the romance and mystery of her historic mission; her riches on the earth, under the earth and in the air.
I believe in the efficiency of her institutions, her healthgiving climate, the dignity of her men and women and her genial western hospitality.
I believe in her business enterprises, the present and its opportunities, the future and its wonderful promises, and in the divine joy of living in San Antonio for you – and me.”

1934
Thirty San Antonio pecan shellers were working under police protection after a group of 50 labor agitators had tried unsuccessfully to make them strike.

1969
At 7:32 a.m. San Antonio time, Apollo 11 blasts off from Cape Kennedy, Florida heading for the moon.  The launch is broadcast live all three networks beginning at 6 a.m. on KSAT Channel 12.