Blog Archives

June 21 in San Antonio history…

1882
Oscar Wilde arrives in San Antonio on the 9:00 a.m. train and stays at the Menger Hotel.  He lectures at Turner Hall in the evening.  The newspapers describe his attire as a black velvet suit with a fob and seal suspended from his vest, breeches gathered at the knee, silk stockings and low shoes with buckles.

1941
Jimmy Johnson’s Playland comes to San Antonio and holds its grand opening in its first location at 223 N. St. Mary’s Street.

1968
A delegation from the San Antonio Conservation Society meets with Secretary of Transportation Alan Boyd in Washington D. C. to express their opposition to the north expressway [now 281] which, when constructed, is scheduled to pass through a portion of Brackenridge Park.

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June 4 in San Antonio history…

1909
Orders have been issued changing the name of Aue, a station on the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad, to Leon Springs.

1926
The Aztec Theatre opened promising “a surprisingly different entertainment.”

1968
Hemisfair celebrates “Ed White Day,” to commemorate the life of San Antonio astronaut Edward White Jr., killed in the Apollo I fire.  Mrs. White and her children, Bonnie and Eddie, participate in a ceremony and are given Hemisfair souvenirs.

May 21 in San Antonio history…

1918
The pasteurization of all milk sold in San Antonio is to be required under new regulations to be issued by the U.S. Public Health Service.  The cost to dairies of installing the necessary equipment will be considerable.

1958
Chuck Jefferson, Woodridge School third grader, was homeward bound with $32,000 he won on the “$64,000 Question” TV show.  “I wanted to go on (for $64,000), but my parents decided I should quit.  It’s too big of a risk.  Sometimes I think parents are too nervous.”

1968
Channel 5 broadcasts the CBS News program “Hunger in America,” filmed in San Antonio, illustrating the problem of poverty and lack of food in American households.

 

April 27 in San Antonio history…

1914
The City Council gives authority to the Scientific Society to establish a zoological garden in Brackenridge Park.  This is the beginning of the San Antonio Zoo.

1968
San Antonio Woolco stores offer San Antonio housewives the opportunity to trade-in their husbands. They offer 10 to 15 cents per pound of the husband’s weight toward the purchase of Whirlpool appliances.

1979
During the Battle of Flowers parade, Ira Attebury sprays the crowd with shotgun and semiautomatic rifle fire from a parked motorhome (right). Two die, 55 are wounded. Attebury commits suicide as SWAT teams close in.

April 6 in San Antonio history…

1956
An ad appeared in the San Antonio Register, the local African-American newspaper, requesting financial donations for the Birmingham bus boycott.

1968
Hemisfair ’68 – San Antonio’s World’s Fair opened today.

1979
Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble play the first of two nights at Ricardo’s Cadillac at 5154 Broadway.

April 4 in San Antonio history…

1936cord2
“Throngs of people” crowd the Winerich Motor Sales Company at Third and Broadway to see the brand new front-wheel drive Cord automobiles (right).

1968
San Antonians are shocked to learn of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee.

1980
The new bridge crossing Salado Creek on Martin Luther King Drive is dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther King, Jr.  on the anniversary of his death.  Mayor Pro Tem Helen Dutmer, Joe Webb, Earl Campbell (superintendent of the San Antonio School District’s Area II) and the Rev. R. A. Callies participate in the ceremony.

March 21 in San Antonio history…

1854
The first issue of the San Antonio Weekly Herald is printed.

1968cpm_map_68
Central Park Mall holds its grand opening (right).

1984
After almost 20 years of showing movies, the North Star Cinema closes.  The triple-screen theater owned and operated by Boston-based GCC Theaters, Inc. showed its final movie today.  Steve Colson, GCC regional vice president said “It was determined that based on our receipts from box office attendance at the theater, it would be better if we were not at the North Star Mall location.”  (The final movies shown at the theater were: “Sahara” starring Brooke Shields, “Lassiter” starring Tom Selleck and “Blame It On Rio” starring Michael Caine.)

March 4 in San Antonio history…

1836
Santa Anna gathers his officers for a council of war. It is decided that when the final assault in the Alamo takes place, that they will take no prisoners. The time for the assault will be determined tomorrow. Having been consolidated into two batteries, the Mexican artillery, is brought to within 200 yards of the compound. More Texian reinforcements arrive in the late hours.

1938prentiss
Paula Ragusa, better known by her stage name of Paula Prentiss (right), is born in San Antonio.

1968
Mister Rogers’ (then spelled Misterogers’) Neighborhood premieres on KLRN Channel 9.  The “prize winning children’s show” debuted nationally on public television on February 19 but today is the first appearance in San Antonio.

January 30 in San Antonio history…

1906
Approximately 60 young ladies and girls employed at Finck’s cigar factory walked out on strike this morning. The girls, who make $8 a week quit because other girls were being hired for as little as $1.50 per week.

1968
A rare copy of a Mexican newspaper containing the earliest known official announcement of the fall of the Alamo is now on display at the Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library next to the Alamo. The newspaper dated March 21, 1836, was acquired from Maury A. Bromsen, a rare books and manuscripts dealer in Boston.

1970
Soul Brother #1, James Brown, performs at Freeman Coliseum.

January 28 in San Antonio history…

1968scan0018
The new Main Library (right) building opens at S. St. Mary’s and West Market streets.

1978
Canadian power trio, Triumph, brings their “Rock and Roll Machine” tour to San Antonio.

1993
The Light goes out.  After 112 years, the San Antonio Light newspaper ceases publication.