Blog Archives

June 22 in San Antonio history…

1876
Former President of Mexico Juan Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna dies of old age in Mexico City.

1917 – World War I
Eight companies of the men in training at Camp Funston [now Camp Stanley] will receive pay for their first month’s work Monday and the remaining companies will be paid Wednesday. The first payment w ill be $100 per man with mileage for those who came to the camp from other cities. The camp has a strength of about 2,700 men and this will mean the paying out of almost $300,000 in the two days set for payment. The work will be done by officers in tho finance department of the quartermaster’s department.

1925
A new state law was passed, changing the name of the Southwest Insane Asylum to San Antonio State Hospital.

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March 29 in San Antonio history…

1925
Architect’s drawings for the new $1,500,000 Texas Theater were published in the newspaper.

1945
Marine SSgt Lucian Adams is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor “for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty on 28 October 1944, near St. Die, France.”

1962
McCreless Shopping City holds its grand opening celebration.  The new mall contains the city’s second Montgomery Ward department store (right).

March 6 in San Antonio history…

183620170301_122130
The final assault on the Alamo begins at approximately 5:30 a.m. Mexican forces take huge losses but capture the compound, killing the last of the 187 defenders who had held out within the walls of the fortified mission for thirteen days.

1925
Parachutes saved the lives of Kelly flyers, Lt. C. D. McAllister and Cadet Charles A. Lindbergh, today when their planes collided in mid-air.  This is said to be the first time that two pilots have saved themselves by use of parachutes after a mid-air collision.

1942
The San Antonio Express reports that several new buildings and an enlarged campus will result from the merger of the University of San Antonio and Trinity University in September.  The full extent of the program was not divulged, but Dr. Wear, President of Trinity University, said that it had been fully worked out and that plans were already on paper.

January 25 in San Antonio history…

1925
St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church announced plans for a new sanctuary at St. Mary’s and Ashby.

1953
Soldiers at Ft. Sam Houston have been advised not to hitchhike by Col. Glenn S. Finley, Deputy Post Commander. “There will be no signaling to passing  vehicles in any manner whatsoever by any army personnel whether they be standing or walking on the traveled portion of the roadways in the direction of traffic.  Hitchhiking or thumbing rides is out. It is unmilitary and brings discredit to the service.”

1995hard rock
The San Antonio Hard Rock Café (right) holds its grand opening celebration.

January 22 in San Antonio history…

1925
The State Legislature prepared to end Bexar County’s “five-minute divorce” system.

1933
Only in chasing criminals or in answering emergency calls will radio patrol cars be allowed to exceed a speed limit of 25 miles per hour in the future, according to an order issued today by Chief of Police Owen Kilday.

1947
“It’s A Joke, Son!,” the new film featuring Kenny Delmar as Senator Claghorn (the inspiration for the animated character Foghorn Leghorn) premieres at the Aztec Theater with in-person appearances from cast members Una Merkel and June Lockhart (later a star on TV shows “Lassie” and “Lost in Space.”)

1973
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson is transported by airplane from his Johnson City ranch to Brooke Army General Hospital where he is pronounced dead on arrival.

November 12 in San Antonio history…

1925
A ban of hand-clapping or any other form of audible applause has been lifted in First Baptist Church. The pastor says the ban has proved embarrassing to visitors unfamiliar with the local regulation.

1942
The Harry Hertzberg Circus Room is formally opened at the San Antonio Public Library.

1971
The Municipal Auditorium features a concert by the Grateful Dead, the New Riders of the Purple Sage, and Bonnie Hearne

October 9 in San Antonio history…

1925
Prohibition agents destroyed 526 bottles of bootleg beer a few doors away from Riverside Baptist Church.

1955
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s Circus performs under the big top in San Antonio for the last time.  All future performances will be in existing coliseums and stadiums.

1962
Hanger 14, a wooden aircraft hangar constructed at Brooks Field in 1917, catches fire and burns to the ground.  Six fire units, three from Brooks and three from San Antonio, fought the blaze on the structure.  There were several explosions when high-pressure oxygen tanks and blank 20-mm ejection seat shells were set off by the fire.

September 1 in San Antonio history…

1925
San Antonio women planned a mass meeting to protest the extension of Crockett Street through Alamo Plaza. By letters, telephone and personal calls the women had been demanding the park be left as it was.

1971
After 90 years as a female college, Incarnate Word College opens the fall semester as a fully coeducational institution.

1980
Playland Park closes for the winter and signs are put up promising the usual St. Patrick’s Day reopening the following year.  Unfortunately, owner Jimmy Johnson decides not to reopen and a legendary San Antonio amusement park passes into history.

July 14 in San Antonio history…

1925
The Dodge Brothers Automobile Company has offered a bulletproof car to the San Antonio City Police.  The sedan is of standard construction, but which, it is claimed, will ride through a fusillade of .45-caliber bullets with perfect safety to the driver and other occupants. The body, mounted on a regular production Dodge passenger car chassis, is made of 10-gauge bulletproof metal. The windshield and windows are of bullet-proof glass.

1949varsity
The Varsity Drive-In Theater at Culebra and Bandera roads holds its grand opening, showing “An Apartment for Peggy.”

1972
Demolition of Fox Tech high school has begun. The 70-year-old buildings will be replaced with a $5 million, 3-000-student complex slated for completion in the fall of 1974. Tech students will go to Brackenridge High School while the work is under way.  Construction starts in October.

July 8 in San Antonio history…

1925
Despondent over the drowning death of his only son nearly four years earlier, Alexander Joske fatally shoots himself.  His death shocked the city and retailers state-wide. In mourning, Mayor John W. Tobin honored the merchant and community leader and ordered city flags flown at half–mast. Joske Brothers Company closed for two days, while throughout the Southwest people remembered Joske as a pioneer merchant who had played a key role in the transforming Texas retailing industry by leading the change from dry goods stores of the last century to the modern department store of the twentieth century.

1956
Trustees of the San Antonio Independent School District were expected to authorize the drawing of plans for a new Edison High School. The school was to be on the south side of Fresno Street, east of Blanco Road, and have a capacity of 1,200 students.

1985kaepa
San Antonio-based Kaepa changes their shoe logo from the swirled-K (right) to the two triangle “double delta.”  Kaepa President Tom Adams says, “From a distance, the original logo just looked like a blob.”