Blog Archives

November 9 in San Antonio history…

1856
A large train of United States camels pass down Commerce Street on their way to Camp Verde.

1918
Private David B. Barkley, who enlisted in San Antonio, drowns while crossing the Meuse River on a scouting mission behind German lines near Pouilly-sur-Meuse, France.  He is later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and he is the second person to lie in state in the Alamo.  The son of Josef Barkley and Antonia Cantu of Laredo, he is the first Mexican-American Medal of Honor winner.

1948
The Centeno family opens their first supermarket at 1802 W. Commerce St.

October 20 in San Antonio history…

1899 >October 20 in San Antonio history...
The first automobile in San Antonio, an electric, arrived at Staacke Brothers today. However, the batteries did not arrive with the car so the first drive will have to wait.

1918
Fredericksburg Road, one of the most prominent and oldest highways in the county, is to lose its German name and hereafter be called “Foch Highway,” after Marshall Foch, French general and Supreme Allied Commander in World War I. The county commissioners’ court yesterday afternoon, acting on a petition of property owners and residents along the road, entered an order making the change in name.

1950
The Menger Hotel hosts the grand opening of their new addition featuring 125 “ultra-modern, fully air-conditioned apartments, suites and guest rooms.”

October 4 in San Antonio history…

1918
Restaurant keepers were notified by the Bexar County Community Labor Board to replace their male employees with women. This was the first direct action by the board in substituting female for male labor due to World War I.

1956
The new Twin Screen Suburban Outdoor Theater opens at Loop 13 and Highway 90 East.

1957
Buddy Holly & the Crickets make their only San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium with “The Biggest Show of Stars for ’57.” Along with the Crickets, the bill includes: Fats Domino, LaVern Baker, The Drifters, Frankie Lymon, Chuck Berry, Clyde McPhatter, Eddie Cochran, The Diamonds, Buddy Knox, Jimmy Bowen and Paul Anka. The concert of many rock and roll stars was probably overshadowed with the news that the Soviet Union had launched an artificial “star” that day – Sputnik.

October 3 in San Antonio history…

1860
A crowd of at least two thousand people turned out to hear Governor Sam Houston speak in San Pedro Springs park.  His speech was followed by a barbecue dinner on the grounds.

1918
Police Chief Lancaster said the Barnum and Bailey Circus has been notified that it would not be permitted to show here Saturday. Reason is there is fear it will aggravate the spread of influenza throughout the city.

1942
H.E.B. opens its first grocery store in San Antonio at 1802 N. Main St.

September 17 in San Antonio history…

1917
Beginning today, traffic policemen stationed on all important street crossings in the downtown district will cease to control traffic by means of their hands and arms. Instead the new signal devices will be in operation.

1918
Five negro soldiers of Company I, 24th United States Infantry, are hanged at daybreak on the Ft. Sam Houston military reservation, for crimes committed during the mutiny and riot of the third battalion of that regiment at Houston, Texas on the night of August 23, 1917.

1994
San Antonio’s annual weekend festival of jazz, Jazz’s Alive, features: Antonio Dionisio & MMR, Fort/Marmolejo Quintet, the Joel Dilley Group with Bett Butler, Sergio Lara & Joe Reyes, Beto y Los Fairlanes and the Rippingtons.

September 4 in San Antonio history…

1888
The cornerstone is laid for the Joske’s building at the corner of Alamo and Commerce Streets.

1918
The San Antonio Evening News publishes its first issue.

1972
WOAI-TV debuts “4 Big News,” a full-hour newscast, featuring Gene Lively, Dave Margulies, Mike Henry and Martha Buchanan, the first woman in Texas to anchor a major weekday news program.

August 22 in San Antonio history…

1905
According to the records in the office of the city engineer, there are 71 automobiles in San Antonio, representing a value of about $37,200.

1918
Military police have been ordered to keep soldiers out of close to a score of eating and drinking places in the carnival district of W. Houston because their women employees lack certificates attesting to their moral character.

1980
San Antonio Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela fans 15 batters in a 3-0 win over Amarillo.  The 19-year-old lefty allowed just two hits in the second half of the season and struck out 162 batters in 174 innings.

August 20 in San Antonio history…

1911
The cornerstone of Hermann Sons Hall is laid.

1918
Married women will hereafter be permitted to secure positions to public schools of the city as the result of the action taken today at a meeting of the San Antonio School Board.  The action was taken as a “war time necessity” with the provision that each applicant be passed upon individually.

1935
The rock from the old post office, quarried from the hills of Texas prior to 1888, will go into a $1 million Catholic shrine, to be built during the centennial.  The shrine, to be dedicated to St. Anthony, will be one of the finest in the United States. Entrance to the structure will be a replica of the Alamo, which was the first shrine to St. Anthony in the United States. The new national shrine will be known as the New Alamo.

 

May 27 in San Antonio history…

1907
Albert Friedrich’s collection of animal horns is said to be the best in existence in point of freakishness. He has the only deer head with horns bearing 78 points.

1918
An attempt wil be made at Kelly Field during Decoration Day proceedings to catch a baseball thrown from an airplane and thus set a height record for catching dropped balls.  The record is now 555 feet.

1988
B.J. “Red” McCombs buys the San Antonio Spurs from Angelo Drossos for $47 million.  “I’m ecstatic,” says Mayor Henry Cisneros.  “The Spurs are in the hands of a San Antonian and that’s the most important thing.”

May 21 in San Antonio history…

1918
The pasteurization of all milk sold in San Antonio is to be required under new regulations to be issued by the U.S. Public Health Service.  The cost to dairies of installing the necessary equipment will be considerable.

1958
Chuck Jefferson, Woodridge School third grader, was homeward bound with $32,000 he won on the “$64,000 Question” TV show.  “I wanted to go on (for $64,000), but my parents decided I should quit.  It’s too big of a risk.  Sometimes I think parents are too nervous.”

1968
Channel 5 broadcasts the CBS News program “Hunger in America,” filmed in San Antonio, illustrating the problem of poverty and lack of food in American households.