Blog Archives

February 17 in San Antonio history…

1918piggly
Piggly Wiggly opened San Antonio’s first self-service grocery.

1983
Billy Squier makes his first appearance in San Antonio, bringing his “Emotions in Motion” tour to Convention Center Arena.  Canadian group Saga opens the show.

1991
The Finck Cigar Company building, built in 1882,  is illegally demolished at 7:45 on a Sunday morning.  A construction company crew discovered at the debris-covered site of the designated city landmark was cited for allegedly violating the city code by not having a demolition permit.  Just weeks after the demolition, State Sen. Frank Tejeda filed a bill requiring responsible parties to rebuild historic buildings that are damaged or destroyed, or pay an amount equal to the estimated replacement cost to be used for preservation projects. But since the bill was not retroactive, it could not be used to make anyone pay the estimated $200,000 it would have cost to replace the Finck Building. In the end, the joint venture paid a $25,000 fine to the city for the demolition.

August 22 in San Antonio history…

1918
Military police have been ordered to keep soldiers out of close to a score of eating and drinking places in the carnival district of W. Houston because their women employees lack certificates attesting to their moral character.

1969
Three Dog Night comes to San Antonio for the first time and plays Municipal Auditorium.  Courtship opens the show.

 

August 20 in San Antonio history…

1918
Married women will hereafter be permitted to secure positions to public schools of the city as the result of the action taken today at a meeting of the San Antonio School Board.  The action was taken as a “war time necessity” with the provision that each applicant be passed upon individually.

1940
Norwegian soprano Kirsten Flagstad performs at the Sunken Garden Theater.

1957
San Antonio’s picturesque old Spanish trails seem to be a little too much for the city’s new $1 million downtown traffic signal system.  Stewart Fischer, city traffic engineer, admitted Friday that the electronic brain that controls the system was not working as well as he had hoped.  He said it would take time to adjust the new system to the city’s street patterns.

June 11 in San Antonio history…

1897
Custodian Bennett of the Alamo has discovered several traces of blood on the walls of the historic old building. They had been covered with whitewash.

1918
The City Council is considering purchase of several lots for the creation of Romana Plaza at the junction of Soledad, Romana, Camden, Main and San Pedro. The triangular plaza would also include property of the Main Avenue fire station.

2004greyhound
In front of an estimated 6,000 fans at Dell Diamond, the Boerne Greyhounds celebrate a 5-1 victory against Denton Ryan in the Class 4A state championship game. In the school’s first trip to the state baseball tournament, they win the whole thing and in the process become Region IV’s first 4A state champion since Corpus Christi Calallen in 2000.

March 14 in San Antonio history…

1918
Capt. B. H. Fournier, noted San Antonio balloonist, and a five cadets were injured when the balloon in which they were making a trial flight from San Antonio fell from an altitude of 3,200 feet near Killeen today.  “The captain,” said one of the cadets, “was the coolest man in the basket and when we neared the ground, he said calmly, ‘Now limber your knees, boys!  Here she comes!'”  Three cadets were uninjured in the crash.

1956
City Councilman Henry B. Gonzalez today proposed that the city act to desegregate the Alamo Heights swimming pool along with city pools, which had been ruled off-limits to people of color on June 19, 1954 – Juneteenth – and one month and two days after the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court case ruled that segregation was a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

1973
Closed mouths and cautious comments were the order of  the day today after The News reported exclusively that San Antonio is likely to be the new home of the Dallas Chaparrals of the American Basketball Association. Roger Zeller, president of Columbia Industries and the only local man of the prospective group of buyers to be identified thus far, had no comment to make and was reluctant to admit a San Antonio group was bidding for the Chaps.

February 17 in San Antonio history…

1918piggly
Piggly Wiggly opened San Antonio’s first self-service grocery.

1950
The first San Antonio Rodeo and Livestock Exposition is kicked off – in the brand new Bexar County Coliseum (later known as the Joe & Harry Freeman Coliseum.)

1991
The Finck Cigar Company building, built in 1882,  is illegally demolished at 7:45 on a Sunday morning.  A construction company crew discovered at the debris-covered site of the designated city landmark was cited for allegedly violating the city code by not having a demolition permit.  Just weeks after the demolition, State Sen. Frank Tejeda filed a bill requiring responsible parties to rebuild historic buildings that are damaged or destroyed, or pay an amount equal to the estimated replacement cost to be used for preservation projects. But since the bill was not retroactive, it could not be used to make anyone pay the estimated $200,000 it would have cost to replace the Finck Building. In the end, the joint venture paid a $25,000 fine to the city for the demolition.

September 4 in San Antonio history…

1888
The cornerstone is laid for the Joske’s building at the corner of Alamo and Commerce Streets.

1918
The San Antonio Evening News publishes its first issue.

1959
San Antonio attorney, Park Street, opens “The Perry Mason Room” in his offices in the National Bank of Commerce building.  Street, a good friend of Erle Stanley Gardner, the creator of the Perry Mason character, has also flown the cast of the television show in for the occasion.  Among furnishings in the Perry Mason room, said Street, are “a witness chair, color television, stereo music, a soft drink counter and every Perry Mason book ever written by Gardner, all autographed.”

August 22 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary of President Wilson, in an address delivered today spoke of the situation with Germany as extremely critical and said that President Wilson stands as the defender of the inalienable rights of Americans on land and sea:  “In this hour of a great international crisis our hopes, our hearts, and our prayers are with our beloved President. If the necessity arises our lives and our sacred honor will follow him.”

1918
Military police have been ordered to keep soldiers out of close to a score of eating and drinking places in the carnival district of W. Houston because their women employees lack certificates attesting to their moral character.

1980
San Antonio Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela fans 15 batters in a 3-0 win over Amarillo.  The 19-year-old lefty allowed just two hits in the second half of the season and struck out 162 batters in 174 innings.

June 23 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
The First Battle of Isonzo begins as Italian troops attack Austrian defenses. Initial gains by the Italians are soon repulsed by the Austrians with heavy casualties for both sides. Three additional battles are fought through the end of 1915 with similar results, totaling 230,000 casualties for the Italians and 165,000 for the Austrians.

1918
The law prohibiting the sale, gift or transportation of alcoholic drinks becomes effective throughout Texas at 10:30 pm June 25. All saloons must close or face the penalty of the law, which is exceptionally severe.

2011Kawhi Leonard
The Spurs trade guard George Hill, who Coach Gregg Popovich once called “my favorite player,” to Indiana for a package highlighted by 6-foot-7 small-forward Kawhi Leonard (photo, with 2014 Finals MVP trophy), whom the Pacers selected with the 15th overall pick.

March 12 in San Antonio history…

1879
Groos Bank and Store is opened for business.  This building, at the corner of Commerce and Navarro (then known as Groos Alley) is first building specifically for banking in San Antonio.

1918
The new Main Avenue High School opens on the site of previous building.

1960
The San Antonio Youth Council of the NAACP sends out letters to six local businesses requesting that they desegregate their lunch counters.  Harry V. Burns, state youth director for the NAACP, says the plan is to work out a desegregation plan that everyone could observe at once, thus putting no one in the position of being first.  Burns indicated that unless Negroes are seated and served generally, they will plan at this Thursday’s meeting a series of sitdown campaigns in the manner of those conducted recently in other southern cities.