Blog Archives

October 19 in San Antonio history…

1918
The county commissioners’ court this afternoon, acting on a petition of about fifty property owners and residents along Fredericksburg road, entered an order changing the name to Foch Highway.  The petition of the property owners pointed out that it seemed that the name “Fredericksburg” which was given to the in honor of the late German Emperor, grandfather of the present Kaiser, was ill-advised in view of the world calamity that Germany has brought about and the road should be renamed in honor of Marshall Foch, the great general of France now leading the armies of the allies.

1940merka
Baylor University defeats Villanova, 7-0, in a game played at Alamo Stadium.  Milt Merka scored the decisive touchdown midway through the final period.

1949
Bexar County’s brand new coliseum was “open for business” with the two-day performance of the Ringling Brothers – Barnum & Bailey Circus.

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October 3 in San Antonio history….

1917 – World War I
It is possible that Kelly Field No. 3 and No. 4 may never be built as planned and that instead about 18,000 acres of land on the opposite side of San Antonio may be obtained for the location of the two camps.  This was made known at the headquarters of Kelly Field this afternoon.

1918
Police Chief Lancaster said the Barnum and Bailey Circus has been notified that it would not be permitted to show here Saturday. Reason is there is fear it will aggravate the spread of influenza throughout the city.

1942tumblr_lw20dqBHNW1qbti9f
H.E.B. opens its first grocery store in San Antonio at 1802 N. Main St.

June 11 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Little Rock, Ark., Louisville, Ky., Battle Creek, Mich., and San Antonio, Tex., have been approved by the War Department as additional cantonment sites for the army. The camp at Fort Sam Houston will be the only wooden cantonment in the Southern Department. The camps at Fort Worth, Waco, Houston and Fort Sill will all be under canvas. It is believed the canvas camps will house as many men as the wooden cantonment, although they will not represent as large a financial investmet in construction. The War Department plans to begin immediate construction of these camps, as it is the intention to have them in readiness for the new army by September 1.

1918
The City Council is considering purchase of several lots for the creation of Romana Plaza at the junction of Soledad, Romana, Camden, Main and San Pedro. The triangular plaza would also include property of the Main Avenue fire station.

1981
George Jones plays Randy’s Rodeo.

June 9 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Registration in the National League for Woman’s Service began in San Antonio today. The first step is a movement to secure the assistance of every woman in the city, stimulating more efficient work, co-ordinating all endeavors, giving every individual her part in the great undertaking on which this country is launched, was taken at the mass meeting of women this morning in the Gunter Hotel.

1918
In broad daylight under the eyes of detectives and scores of patrolmen, a daring San Antonio thief stole a policeman’s horse, tired directly in front of police headquarters. A general pursuit failed to catch him.

1926
Mayor Tobin outlined plans to convert the downtown river into a veritable fairyland, rivaling in beauty the canals of Venice.

May 23 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
President Wilson today renewed his efforts to put an enforced newspaper censorship section into the espionage bill. Senators Overman, Fletcher and Nelson, the Senate’s conferees on the bill, were called to the White House and urged by the President to agree to a censorship section which the House since has rejected. They were asked to learn whether it is possible to allay the senate’s objections and if possible bring out a new and so-called modified censorship clause. President Wilson told the Senate conferees that he deems authority to invoke censorship of some sort absolutely essential.

1918
Miss Katherine Stinson, San Antonio aviatrix, started a flight from Chicago to New York with mail at 7:37 a.m. today.  Miss Stinson, 22, is averaging 71 miles per hour.  The flight is being made to establish a long-distance, non-stop record.

1942
San Antonio’s last living Civil War veteran, Charles Sickles, is buried in the National Cemetery.

February 17 in San Antonio history…

1918piggly
Piggly Wiggly opened San Antonio’s first self-service grocery.

1983
Billy Squier makes his first appearance in San Antonio, bringing his “Emotions in Motion” tour to Convention Center Arena.  Canadian group Saga opens the show.

1991
The Finck Cigar Company building, built in 1882,  is illegally demolished at 7:45 on a Sunday morning.  A construction company crew discovered at the debris-covered site of the designated city landmark was cited for allegedly violating the city code by not having a demolition permit.  Just weeks after the demolition, State Sen. Frank Tejeda filed a bill requiring responsible parties to rebuild historic buildings that are damaged or destroyed, or pay an amount equal to the estimated replacement cost to be used for preservation projects. But since the bill was not retroactive, it could not be used to make anyone pay the estimated $200,000 it would have cost to replace the Finck Building. In the end, the joint venture paid a $25,000 fine to the city for the demolition.

August 22 in San Antonio history…

1918
Military police have been ordered to keep soldiers out of close to a score of eating and drinking places in the carnival district of W. Houston because their women employees lack certificates attesting to their moral character.

1969
Three Dog Night comes to San Antonio for the first time and plays Municipal Auditorium.  Courtship opens the show.

 

August 20 in San Antonio history…

1918
Married women will hereafter be permitted to secure positions to public schools of the city as the result of the action taken today at a meeting of the San Antonio School Board.  The action was taken as a “war time necessity” with the provision that each applicant be passed upon individually.

1940
Norwegian soprano Kirsten Flagstad performs at the Sunken Garden Theater.

1957
San Antonio’s picturesque old Spanish trails seem to be a little too much for the city’s new $1 million downtown traffic signal system.  Stewart Fischer, city traffic engineer, admitted Friday that the electronic brain that controls the system was not working as well as he had hoped.  He said it would take time to adjust the new system to the city’s street patterns.

June 11 in San Antonio history…

1897
Custodian Bennett of the Alamo has discovered several traces of blood on the walls of the historic old building. They had been covered with whitewash.

1918
The City Council is considering purchase of several lots for the creation of Romana Plaza at the junction of Soledad, Romana, Camden, Main and San Pedro. The triangular plaza would also include property of the Main Avenue fire station.

2004greyhound
In front of an estimated 6,000 fans at Dell Diamond, the Boerne Greyhounds celebrate a 5-1 victory against Denton Ryan in the Class 4A state championship game. In the school’s first trip to the state baseball tournament, they win the whole thing and in the process become Region IV’s first 4A state champion since Corpus Christi Calallen in 2000.

March 14 in San Antonio history…

1918
Capt. B. H. Fournier, noted San Antonio balloonist, and a five cadets were injured when the balloon in which they were making a trial flight from San Antonio fell from an altitude of 3,200 feet near Killeen today.  “The captain,” said one of the cadets, “was the coolest man in the basket and when we neared the ground, he said calmly, ‘Now limber your knees, boys!  Here she comes!'”  Three cadets were uninjured in the crash.

1956
City Councilman Henry B. Gonzalez today proposed that the city act to desegregate the Alamo Heights swimming pool along with city pools, which had been ruled off-limits to people of color on June 19, 1954 – Juneteenth – and one month and two days after the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court case ruled that segregation was a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

1973
Closed mouths and cautious comments were the order of  the day today after The News reported exclusively that San Antonio is likely to be the new home of the Dallas Chaparrals of the American Basketball Association. Roger Zeller, president of Columbia Industries and the only local man of the prospective group of buyers to be identified thus far, had no comment to make and was reluctant to admit a San Antonio group was bidding for the Chaps.