Blog Archives

January 24 in San Antonio history…

1905
The State Legislature passed a bill to purchase the Alamo for a historic shrine for $65,000.

1918 – World War I
Garments furnished by the Red Cross may now be worn by soldiers and officers without fear of violating the rules of Camp Travis.  The adjutant of the army has given out the following information:  “The wearing of woolen garments furnished by the Red  Cross, or by private individuals, is authorized when necessary on account of climatic conditions.  If the clothing furnished by the Government is not sufficient, the garments may also be worn.”

1938
Demolishing of the old markethouse on Market Plaza started today.  After the 37-year old structure is razed, construction will begin on a new $168,981 markethouse.  It will be one story of brick and concrete.

 

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January 23 in San Antonio history…

1918
In San Antonio’s sensational “Trial of the Century,” Miss Hedda Burgemeister is found not guilty of the murder of Otto Koehler by a jury in the Thirty-seventh district court.  The verdict was returned by the jury shortly after 12 o’clock and Miss Burgemeister was immediately surrounded by friends who showered their congratulations upon her.  Mr. Koehler, President and manager of the San Antonio Brewing Association (Pearl Brewery) was killed on Nov. 12, 1914 in the little cottage on Hunstock Avenue that he had given to Miss Burgemeister.

1968
The tophouse of the Tower of the Americas is lifted into place (right).

1970
Chicago Transit Authority comes to San Antonio for the first time and plays a concert in Hemisfair Arena.  The Youngbloods open the show.

January 22 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Some San Antonio businesses have been ignoring or refusing to obey the orders of the government regarding special lighting reductions on Sunday and Thursday nights.  Further failure to obey this law will be followed by prosecutions, including up to a fine of $5000 or a penitentiary sentence of one year.

1973
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson is transported by airplane from his Johnson City ranch to Brooke Army General Hospital where he is pronounced dead on arrival.

1978
About 100 people under five feet tall marched in the cold from HemisFair Plaza to City Hall to protest the prejudice of Randy Newman’s song “Short People.”  The “Puny People Protest Parade” was staged by radio station KTSA.

January 21 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Cadet Frank L. Seery of Evanston, Ill. was instantly killed and Cadet V. C. Dunham of Rochester, N. Y., received injuries from which he died an hour and a half later, in a collision of airplanes at Kelly Field at 10 a.m. this morning.

1984
USAA dedicates their new Federal Savings Bank under construction. It is due to open Summer 1985.

1999solo
Sixty-three years after Isadore Brenner opened the store as “Brenner’s” on Soledad Street, longtime San Antonio discount store Solo Serve files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

January 20 in San Antonio history…

1908
John Crivelli, the fireman who was injured on January 3, when a hose cart in which he was riding overturned on Alamo Street, died this afternoon in  the City Hospital.  Immediately after the accident, he was removed to Santa Rosa Hospital and remained there until about a week ago when he was moved to City Hospital.  The hopes for his recovery were slight at all times but owing to his strong constitution the attending physicians thought he might pull through.

1918 – World War I
Valuable army records were burned with approximately $10,000 in losses when fire destroyed the headquarters building of the student officers’ reserve training school at Camp Stanley.  The fire originated from a stove in the telephone exchange office at about 4:30 a.m.  The camp telephone exchange building was also destroyed and the camp cut off from telephone communications.

1988
The Express-News reports that financially strapped Antonian College Preparatory School, an all-boys Catholic high school, may be admitting girls next fall if Archbishop Flores gives his OK.  Flores should make a decision on the plan by early January, said Brother Peter A. Pontolillo, superintendent of schools for the archdiocese.  A decision on a proposal to make Holy Cross High School co-educational was also postponed until January.

January 18 in San Antonio history…

1886
Leopold Wolfson buys the White Elephant Saloon to expand his dry goods business.   The building is destroyed on Oct. 1, 2011 in a fire.

1918
The Battle of Flowers Association appropriated $600 to endow a bed in the first American hospital in France.

1960
Ray Charles and the Raelets play a concert in Municipal Auditorium (right).

January 17 in San Antonio history…

1917
Oysters are served at the annual alumni meeting of St. Mary’s College, thus beginning the tradition of Oyster Bake.

1918
The news reports on the trial of Emma Burgemeister that began yesterday.  Testimony shows that immediately after the killing of Otto Koehler, Miss Burgemeister addmitted the act as hers, claiming it was in self-defense and to protect the honor of her friend.

1932
The new Central Catholic High School is dedicated.

January 16 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The battery of field artillery that fired the first American shot against the Germans was commanded by a San Antonio officer, Captain Ralph Heard, according to letters received in San Antonio from members of the expeditionary force.  A French .75 was the weapon used.  Captain Heard is the son of Col. J. W. Heard, of the regular army and was graduated from San Antonio High School with honors in 1915.

1920
Prohibition as directed by the 18th Amendment takes effect tonight at midnight.

1928
Bluebonnet HotelThe Bluebonnet Hotel at St. Mary’s and Pecan streets opens for business.

 

January 15 in San Antonio history…

1918
A new division of the police department, composed of picked detectives under the direction of Albert Van Riper, has been created to wage a crusade on bootleggers.  These men will undertake the enforcement of the new ordinance, passed yesterday by the council, prohibiting the sale of liquor in packages to be drunk elsewhere than on the premises where sold.

1956
Elvis Presley makes his first San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium (right), playing a 3 pm matinee and an 8 pm show. He will return to San Antonio twice more in 1956.

1974
“Happy Days” premieres on KSAT Channel 12 at 7 p.m.

 

January 14 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
A plan of reorganization, that makes Kelly Field into an even more efficient machine for converting recruit units into trained aero squadrons, was put into operation at the field this morning.  By it, the first training brigade will receive the men as they arrive off the train, test them for trades and organize them into squadrons.  In the second training brigade, they will be given intensive training, and as the call comes for men overseas, they will be sent from the camp completely equipped and trained.

1974
San Antonio drivers are dismayed as the speed limit drops to the federally-mandated 55 mph at one minute after midnight.  The limit will remain at the “double-nickel” until Congress lifted all federal speed limit controls in the November 28, 1995, National Highway Designation Act, returning all speed limit determination authority to the states effective December 8, 1995.

2010
The Balcones Heights shopping mall built as Wonderland Mall in 1960, renamed Crossroads Mall in 1987, changes its name again to “Wonderland of the Americas.”