Blog Archives

January 3 in San Antonio history…

1909
Prentice Newman, the San Antonio mechanic who invented the fourth aeroplane to be tried in this country, soared to a height of 70 feet above the ground yesterday.  The machine, towed by an automobile, crashed after the tow rope broke but Newman was uninjured.

1964
A month before their appearance on the Ed Sullivan show, the Beatles are shown on American television for the first time – on the Jack Paar Show at 9 p.m. on WOAI Channel 4.

1974
Gymnast Cathy Rigby (right) debuts as Peter Pan in a World Premiere engagement at Convention Center Arena.

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December 10 in San Antonio history…

1912
The city’s first F.W. Woolworth & Co. store opens at the corner of  Houston & Alamo streets (right).

1971
Savoy Brown, Atomic Rooster and Chicken Shack play a concert in Municipal Auditorium.

1974
On the 25th anniversary of the station, WOAI-TV changes their call letters to KMOL.

December 2 in San Antonio history…

1927Ford_Ad
At 10 a.m. sharp, the doors to Municipal Auditorium are opened and San Antonians rush in to see “the new Ford” – the Model A – first new Ford model in 15 years.  By noon, five-thousand have seen the new phaeton and the two-door sedan, with 5,000 more predicted to see the cars before the doors close late tonight.

1974
The Victoria Lounge at 136 W. Durango was destroyed at about 8 a.m. when one of three Southern Pacific boxcars rolled down a grade and crashed into the building. No one was in the lounge at the time of the accident.

1979
The deposed Shah of Iran arrives at Kelly AFB to recuperate from cancer surgery at Wilford Hall.  He would leave the US on December 15 and reside in Panama until March 1980 when he relocated to Egypt.  He died there on July 27, 1980 and is buried in Cairo.

September 24 in San Antonio history…

1896
The city brewery is repairing several blocks of River [now Broadway] on its own account since the street was so full of holes their big wagon could not get out.

1918 – World War I
Col. Alexander Weatherill, chief of staff of the 18th division, Camp Travis, contradicts an Associated Press report from Washington that states that there is influenza in Camp Travis, saying, “Such [a] report is not only not substantiated by facts, but is positively dangerous to the morale of the camp.”

1974
“Thunder” is selected from over 1,500 entries for San Antonio’s new North American Soccer League team.  Mike Boyle is named General Manager of the team.  He was previously GM of the San Antonio Brewers.

March 28 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The Salvation Army’s drive for $10,000, San Antonio’s quota for the money being raised for Salvation Army work in the military camps, was launched yesterday with a luncheon in the St. Anthony Hotel.

1927IMAG0991
The new Magnolia gas station at Broadway and the Austin Highway opens for business (photo, right, taken in 2011).

1974
Johnny Cash and his wife, June Carter Cash, perform at Municipal Auditorium along with their children, Roseanne Cash, Rosey Nix and Carlene Carter.

January 15 in San Antonio history…

1918
A new division of the police department, composed of picked detectives under the direction of Albert Van Riper, has been created to wage a crusade on bootleggers.  These men will undertake the enforcement of the new ordinance, passed yesterday by the council, prohibiting the sale of liquor in packages to be drunk elsewhere than on the premises where sold.

1956
Elvis Presley makes his first San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium (right), playing a 3 pm matinee and an 8 pm show. He will return to San Antonio twice more in 1956.

1974
“Happy Days” premieres on KSAT Channel 12 at 7 p.m.

 

January 14 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
A plan of reorganization, that makes Kelly Field into an even more efficient machine for converting recruit units into trained aero squadrons, was put into operation at the field this morning.  By it, the first training brigade will receive the men as they arrive off the train, test them for trades and organize them into squadrons.  In the second training brigade, they will be given intensive training, and as the call comes for men overseas, they will be sent from the camp completely equipped and trained.

1974
San Antonio drivers are dismayed as the speed limit drops to the federally-mandated 55 mph at one minute after midnight.  The limit will remain at the “double-nickel” until Congress lifted all federal speed limit controls in the November 28, 1995, National Highway Designation Act, returning all speed limit determination authority to the states effective December 8, 1995.

2010
The Balcones Heights shopping mall built as Wonderland Mall in 1960, renamed Crossroads Mall in 1987, changes its name again to “Wonderland of the Americas.”

December 6 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Wives and other dependents are making pilgrimages to Camp Travis to try and secure the release of drafted husbands, brothers and sons.  Announcements from the camp seek to discourage such trips and monetary expenditures as they are accomplishing nothing.

1945
The world’s first air-conditioned bus rolled into experimental use here and surprised and pleased customers.

1974
Joe Cocker performs at Municipal Auditorium in support of his new release “I Can Stand a Little Rain.”  English trio Trapeze opens the show.

October 1 in San Antonio history…

1974
The San Antonio Light begins publishing an early edition of the newspaper, available on city newsstands by 6 a.m.

1991
Sellout, Inc. – a group headed by Red McCombs, Gary Woods and Russ Bookbinder – purchases an Arena League football franchise that will play in HemisFair Arena.  The team will be called the San Antonio Force.

2014
Paul McCartney plays a concert in the Tobin Center in front of a sold-out audience of 1,754, topping off a week of grand opening festivities and performances.  Ticket prices range from $250 to $3,500.

August 3 in San Antonio history…

1883
The first issue of the San Antonio Light is published. (Originally published starting in 1881 as The Evening Light.)

1917 – World War I
Percy Tyrrell, manager of the Gunter hotel, who is district chairman for the movement which was recently started to train civilian cooks for the army in the hotels of the country, has been literally
“swamped” with applications within the last two days. Who will be accepted, however, must be left to Capt. J. II. Dickey of the quartermaster’s department who has charge of that phase of the work. To date, about twenty white men and almost a hundred negroes have made application for positions as army cooks.

1974
After an 11-day prison break attempt, San Antonio drug kingpin Fred Carrasco is killed in a shootout at Huntsville.  Carrasco, Rodolfo Dominguez, and two hostages die in the attempt.  Another hostage, Prison Chaplain Rev. Joseph O’Brien, is wounded in the chest and left arm.  Two inmate hostages are also slightly wounded.