Blog Archives

March 28 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The Salvation Army’s drive for $10,000, San Antonio’s quota for the money being raised for Salvation Army work in the military camps, was launched yesterday with a luncheon in the St. Anthony Hotel.

1927IMAG0991
The new Magnolia gas station at Broadway and the Austin Highway opens for business (photo, right, taken in 2011).

1974
Johnny Cash and his wife, June Carter Cash, perform at Municipal Auditorium along with their children, Roseanne Cash, Rosey Nix and Carlene Carter.

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January 15 in San Antonio history…

1918
A new division of the police department, composed of picked detectives under the direction of Albert Van Riper, has been created to wage a crusade on bootleggers.  These men will undertake the enforcement of the new ordinance, passed yesterday by the council, prohibiting the sale of liquor in packages to be drunk elsewhere than on the premises where sold.

1956
Elvis Presley makes his first San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium (right), playing a 3 pm matinee and an 8 pm show. He will return to San Antonio twice more in 1956.

1974
“Happy Days” premieres on KSAT Channel 12 at 7 p.m.

 

January 14 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
A plan of reorganization, that makes Kelly Field into an even more efficient machine for converting recruit units into trained aero squadrons, was put into operation at the field this morning.  By it, the first training brigade will receive the men as they arrive off the train, test them for trades and organize them into squadrons.  In the second training brigade, they will be given intensive training, and as the call comes for men overseas, they will be sent from the camp completely equipped and trained.

1974
San Antonio drivers are dismayed as the speed limit drops to the federally-mandated 55 mph at one minute after midnight.  The limit will remain at the “double-nickel” until Congress lifted all federal speed limit controls in the November 28, 1995, National Highway Designation Act, returning all speed limit determination authority to the states effective December 8, 1995.

2010
The Balcones Heights shopping mall built as Wonderland Mall in 1960, renamed Crossroads Mall in 1987, changes its name again to “Wonderland of the Americas.”

December 6 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Wives and other dependents are making pilgrimages to Camp Travis to try and secure the release of drafted husbands, brothers and sons.  Announcements from the camp seek to discourage such trips and monetary expenditures as they are accomplishing nothing.

1945
The world’s first air-conditioned bus rolled into experimental use here and surprised and pleased customers.

1974
Joe Cocker performs at Municipal Auditorium in support of his new release “I Can Stand a Little Rain.”  English trio Trapeze opens the show.

October 1 in San Antonio history…

1974
The San Antonio Light begins publishing an early edition of the newspaper, available on city newsstands by 6 a.m.

1991
Sellout, Inc. – a group headed by Red McCombs, Gary Woods and Russ Bookbinder – purchases an Arena League football franchise that will play in HemisFair Arena.  The team will be called the San Antonio Force.

2014
Paul McCartney plays a concert in the Tobin Center in front of a sold-out audience of 1,754, topping off a week of grand opening festivities and performances.  Ticket prices range from $250 to $3,500.

August 3 in San Antonio history…

1883
The first issue of the San Antonio Light is published. (Originally published starting in 1881 as The Evening Light.)

1917 – World War I
Percy Tyrrell, manager of the Gunter hotel, who is district chairman for the movement which was recently started to train civilian cooks for the army in the hotels of the country, has been literally
“swamped” with applications within the last two days. Who will be accepted, however, must be left to Capt. J. II. Dickey of the quartermaster’s department who has charge of that phase of the work. To date, about twenty white men and almost a hundred negroes have made application for positions as army cooks.

1974
After an 11-day prison break attempt, San Antonio drug kingpin Fred Carrasco is killed in a shootout at Huntsville.  Carrasco, Rodolfo Dominguez, and two hostages die in the attempt.  Another hostage, Prison Chaplain Rev. Joseph O’Brien, is wounded in the chest and left arm.  Two inmate hostages are also slightly wounded.

April 20 in San Antonio history…

1891
President Benjamin Harrison visits San Antonio during the inaugural Fiesta San Jacinto. He is the first President to visit the Alamo City.

1974
Chet Atkins performs at Convention Center Banquet Hall.

1986
Former Dallas Cowboy wide receiver, Drew Pearson, turns in his resignation as weekend sportscaster on KENS-TV.  “He felt he couldn’t devote the time necessary to become a top-flight sports anchor,” Gary DeLaune explained after substituting for Pearson on the 5 p.m. news.

April 10 in San Antonio history…

1917
The Light has made arrangements through the San Antonio Gas and Electric Company to announce the result of tonight’s school board election as soon as it can he determined. This is to he done by flashing all the electric lights in the city. In the event the School Children ’s ticket is victorious the lights will he flashed once and if the Independent ticket wins the lights will be flashed twice. It is expected the result will be known at 8 o’clock or shortly after.

1931
The new African-American newspaper, the San Antonio Register, owned by Valmo C. Bellinger, publishes its first issue.

1974
Rev. Bob Harrington, “The Chaplain of Bourbon Street,” preaches a sermon at halftime of a critical playoff game between the Spurs and the Indiana Pacers (below).  “You’re going for your Pearl [beer] and I am talking about the pearly gates,” said Harrington.  The Spurs won, 102 -86.  “Bring Harrington to Indiana,” said one Spur as he left the court.  Harrington resumed preaching after the game and about 3,000 of the 12,304 spectators stayed to listen.
(Photo courtesy of the San Antonio Express-News)

March 13 in San Antonio history…

1884
The Vaudeville Theater, closed by police after the shooting of Ben Thompson and King Fisher two days ago, was reopened. Few people attended, however.

1917
A stolen automobile collided with a popcorn wagon at 12:10 o’clock this afternoon, badly damaging the latter vehicle. The automobile, a service car, was owned by Joe Krum, 1111 West Travis Street, and was being operated by Joe Page, 631 Mission Street. The latter stopped the car Avenue C and Third Street. Hardly had the chauffeur left the automobile when the thief bounded into it and rapidly drove away. The collision with a popcorn wagon on Avenue C, two blocks from the scene of the theft, brought the machine to a standstill.

1974
The file “Don’t Leave Go My Hand,” an adaptation of Arthur Roberson’s play, first produced in California in 1969, and directed by Vantile Whitfield, has its world premiere at the Woodlawn Theater.

 

February 26 in San Antonio history…

1883
The cornerstone of Paine (Travis Park) Methodist-Episcopal Church is laid.

1936
Amelia Earhart, famed woman flyer, in San Antonio for a visit, spiked rumors that she is planning another around-the-world flight.
(Despite her denial, she was in fact planning an around the world flight.  She left Oakland on May 21, 1937 and disappeared on July 2.)

1974
Rodney Allen Rippy, child star of commercials for Jack In The Box restaurants, comes to San Antonio on a promotional tour.  He is whisked by limousine from the airport to the Jack In The Box at Vance Jackson and Loop 410 for supper.