Blog Archives

August 17 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Major General Henry Trueman Allen, assigned as commander of Camp Travis, is expected to report for duty about the middle of next week. General Allen is well known to many officers at the post, having been stationed at Fort Bliss, in this department, as colonel of the Thirteenth cavalry. No word has been received at Fort Sam Houston as to General Parker’s successor as department commander.

1956
The Edwards Aquifer reaches its lowest recorded level at 612.5 feet.

1980
Fleetwood Mac comes to the Convention Center to promote their new album “Tusk.”  Rocky Burnette, whose cousin Billy would join Fleetwood Mac in 1991, opened the show.

August 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With only two days remaining before the close of the whirlwind campaign for the $10,000 War Recreation Fund, members of the San Antonio Rotary Club will “get busy and busier’’ to raise the money. Though the reports at today’s luncheon, which was held at the Menger Hotel, were not as gratifying
as those of Tuesday, there is no discouragement, but rather a determination to win out in the end.

1956
A man who threatened to blow up the Bexar County National Bank with nitroglycerine escaped with $2,000 in a daring daylight holdup today.

1987
The doors close for the final time on the downtown Joske’s store to prepare for a storewide renovation and transformation into Dillard’s.

July 24 in San Antonio history…

1885
Track laying begins for the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad.

1917 – World War I
The $64,000,000 airplane bill became a law today with President Wilson’s signature.  More than 20,000 planes are to be built as a first increment and many thousands of aviators will be trained.

1956
Plans for a convention hall and civic center at La Villita were unveiled today by V. H. Braunig, City Public Service Board manager.

 

July 8 in San Antonio history…

1917
The gradual elimination of horses and their replacement by motors in all city departments where feasible, is the aim of Mayor Bell. Under this plan no more fire horses will be purchased, but instead motor-driven apparatus will be provided as soon as the horses now in use die or become incapacitated. “It is not our intention to motorize the department at once,” said Mayor Bell, “but instead of buying m ore horses we will purchase tractors or small motor trucks as they may be needed. I believe this will materially increase the efficiency of the department and the cost, in the long run, will be less. In other departments I hope to see motors replace horses, where this is feasible.”

1956
Trustees of the San Antonio Independent School District were expected to authorize the drawing of plans for a new Edison High School. The school was to be on the south side of Fresno Street, east of Blanco Road, and have a capacity of 1,200 students.

2011
Steve Earle plays Gruene Hall.

 

June 14 in San Antonio history…

1952
San Antonio’s garbage workers went back to their jobs this morning after a sit-down strike that lasted two hours and 27 minutes but it appears that the controversy is still red hot. Sixty-one drivers and 122 pickup men refused to go out on their routes this morning because they want Ed Marceau, superintendent, who had handed in his letter of resignation, to come back, and they want changes in the truck maintenance setup.

1956>May 11 in San Antonio history...
City philatelists flocked to the post offices today to be first in line when the new Alamo postage stamps (right) went on sale at 7 a.m.

1992
Due to a very rainy winter and spring, the water in the J-17 Edwards Aquifer monitoring well reaches an all-time high of 703.3 feet.

May 17 in San Antonio history…

1887
Ignatius Coyle smashes the image of Saint Theresa at the Alamo Church and is arrested by Captain Tom Rife.

1917 – World War I
Representative Slayden has received communications from patriotic and charitably inclined citizens proposing to locate colonies of Belgians in Texas, where lands are cheap and fertile.  The Belgian minister responded today, saying, “Answering your friends’ inquiry, I have the honor to inform you that the Belgian government does not favor or endorse the exodus to foreign countries of its citizens.  As you certainly will understand, Belgium will need after the war is over all her able-bodied people to help to rebuild the ruins and the devastations which occurred during the great European conflict.  However, I appreciate the charitable initiative of your citizens.”

1956
“The Biggest Rock and Roll Show of 1956 comes to Municipal Auditorium, featuring Bill Haley & His Comets, The Platters, Joe Turner, The Teen-agers, The Colts, The Teen Queens, Bo Diddley, Clyde McPhatter, The Drifters, The Flamingos, LaVern Baker, and Red Prysock & his Rock and Roll Orchestra.

May 4 in San Antonio history…

1917
Adams & Adams were elected architects for the San Antonio School Board at an adjourned meeting of that body held today at noon in the school board offices. While Ralph D. Cameron, employed by the former board during the past year of intensive construction, and architect of the new Main Avenue High School, was highly recommended by the former board for the excellent work he had done, the present board chose to select a new name.

1956
The San Antonio Register reports on the recent removal of segregation signs from buses of the San Antonio Transit Company, saying, “Actually, although the signs had been in place until Wednesday, last week, segregation had not been enforced on city buses in a number of years.”

1960
Due to segregation protests for the sixth consecutive business day, Joske’s closes all three of their cafeterias to the public.  The Camellia Room and Chuck Wagon, which are for whites only, and the integrated basement cafeteria which will now be for Joske’s employees only.  Joske’s issues this statement:  “For 88 years Joske’s has, as a matter of basic policy, conformed to the established and accepted customs of this community. When those customs and practices change, Joske’s will change with them. Because of the continuing demonstrations involving the Camellia room and because Joske’s wishes its customers to shop in an atmosphere of harmony, all Joske restaurant service will be temporarily discontinued. In the meantime, Joske’s will continue to participate, as it has during the past several months, in all civic efforts to bring about a solution to the community problem affecting restaurant facilities.” 

May 3 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Sheppard amendment is approved by the Senate conference committee on the Army appropriations bill, providing $330,000 for the purchase of more than one thousand acres adjoining Ft. Sam Houston.  The Senate conferees also approved a $30,000 item to provide for additional hospital facilities.

1956
Henry B. Gonzalez announced he was resigning from the city council to run for state senator from San Antonio.

1963
Tony Bennett signs autographs in Platter Palace on the lower level of Wonderland Shopping City for fans, and then performs his concert,  “A Swingin’ Evening with Tony Bennett” at Municipal Auditorium at 8:30  p.m.  One lucky fan, and a guest of her choice, gets to have lunch with Tony in the Mr. Checkers restaurant before the show.

April 27 in San Antonio history…

1914
The City Council gives authority to the Scientific Society to establish a zoological garden in Brackenridge Park.  This is the beginning of the San Antonio Zoo.

1956body_snatchers
The Texas Theater begins showing the sci-fi double feature of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Atomic Man (right).”

1979
During the Battle of Flowers parade, Ira Attebury sprays the crowd with shotgun and semiautomatic rifle fire from a parked motorhome. Two die, 55 are wounded. Attebury commits suicide as SWAT teams close in.

April 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The taking of the first American prisoner of war was reported to the American embassy today through the American consul at Glasgow.

1933burnett
Carol Creighton Burnett is born in San Antonio, near W. Commerce and Rosillo streets.

1956
Segregation was ended on San Antonio buses in line with a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.