Blog Archives

March 22 in San Antonio history…

1882
A notice appears in the San Antonio Light that states:  “Parties desiring electric lights, before deciding, will consult their interests by application at the office of the San Antonio Gas Company.  This company will be prepared to furnish electric light wherever wanted, promptly and on satisfactory terms.”
Thomas G. Williams
Secretary, San Antonio Gas Company

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light says, “When you buy your new suit for Easter, don’t take the old one and put it away in a closet for moths to eat.  Send it to the Chandler Building for the Red Cross to send to Belgium.  Some poor half-naked Belgian hero will be made comfortable by it and will bless you the rest of his days.”

1956
In advance of a May 12 Federal Court hearing, the City Council repeals the June 19, 1954 ordinance (No. 20307) prohibiting people of color from city swimming pools.

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March 8 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Maj. General Henry T. Allen, commander of Camp Travis, spoke today before the Rotary Club at its weekly luncheon at the St. Anthony Hotel, saying, “Lloyd George has made the statement and it has been published abroad and I suppose over here, that no great offensive, costly in lives, is to be made by the allies until the Americans are here in force.”

1945
Trinity University officials announced the school’s new campus would be opposite Alamo Stadium.

1956
San Antonio’s second oldest radio station, KTSA, is sold to Gordon McLendon and the McLendon Investment Corp. by O. R. Mitchell , president of O. R. Mitchell Motors, for $306,000 pending approval by the FCC.

February 27 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Training in cross country flying by night is contemplated by the flying department at Kelly Field.  While the night flying has been confined to the field so far, it has served the purpose of training the aviators in landing, which is the most difficult and dangerous part of flying at night.  It is now planning to extend this training by cross country flights to be made at night.

1956
An all-girl vocal group called “The Wailers” makes their debut performance in the “Frolic of Fun” at Phillis Wheatley High School.  The members include Kay Byers, Gloria Himes, Lois Tonsall and 14 year-old Darlene Wright.  Wright would later move to Los Angeles and is today known as Darlene Love.  She was named to Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 100 Greatest Singers.

1957
Jimmy Dorsey performs at the Municipal Auditorium, two days before his 53rd birthday and less than four months before his death from cancer on June 12.  At the time of his death, his final recording, “So Rare,” was #5 on the Billboard charts.  It would reach #2 and be named the #5 song for all of 1957.

January 15 in San Antonio history…

1918
A new division of the police department, composed of picked detectives under the direction of Albert Van Riper, has been created to wage a crusade on bootleggers.  These men will undertake the enforcement of the new ordinance, passed yesterday by the council, prohibiting the sale of liquor in packages to be drunk elsewhere than on the premises where sold.

1956
Elvis Presley makes his first San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium (right), playing a 3 pm matinee and an 8 pm show. He will return to San Antonio twice more in 1956.

1974
“Happy Days” premieres on KSAT Channel 12 at 7 p.m.

 

October 14 in San Antonio history…

1885
Ground is broken for the new San Antonio National Bank building on Commerce street.

1956elvis_1956
Elvis Presley with his band, Scotty Moore, Bill Black and D.J. Fontana,  played two shows at the Bexar County Coliseum to thousands of swooning, screaming, mainly female, fans.  It was the third appearance for Elvis in San Antonio in 1956. (photo from the Institute of Texan Cultures San Antonio Light Collection.)

1973
As a result of the energy crisis, the annual Windcrest Light-Up Christmas light display has been cancelled.  A daytime contest will be substituted, says Mrs. Robert Jenkins, sponsor of the event.  The city will still be installing lights downtown on schedule but a decision to turn them on will be made at a later date.

October 9 in San Antonio history…

1937
Completing moving operations 36 hours ahead of schedule, the San Antonio post office department was firmly settled in its new $1,800,000 building at 3 p. m. today.  Postmaster Dan Quill had the distinction of mailing the firstair mall letter. He dropped it in the slot at exactly 2:01 p. m. He did not reveal its destination.

1955
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s Circus performs under the big top in San Antonio for the last time.  All future performances will be in existing coliseums and stadiums.

1956
Presidential candidate Richard Nixon makes campaign speech in San Antonio and places a wreath at the Alamo.
San Antonians interested in politics went to the Alamo to hear him speak.  Sports fans were too busy talking about Don Larsen’s perfect game in the World Series the night before.

October 4 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I>October 4 in San Antonio history...
Camp Travis is to supplant Camp Funston, Leon Springs, as a training school for officers of the reserve corps, and the camp at Leon Springs is to be utilized for other military purposes.  Just what use will be made of the reservation has not been made public.

1956
The new Twin Screen Suburban Outdoor Theater opens at Loop 13 and Highway 90 East.

1957
Buddy Holly & the Crickets make their only San Antonio appearance at the Municipal Auditorium with “The Biggest Show of Stars for ’57.” Along with the Crickets, the bill includes: Fats Domino, LaVern Baker, The Drifters, Frankie Lymon, Chuck Berry, Clyde McPhatter, Eddie Cochran, The Diamonds, Buddy Knox, Jimmy Bowen and Paul Anka (right). The concert of many rock and roll stars was probably overshadowed with the news that the Soviet Union had launched an artificial “star” that day – Sputnik.

September 19 in San Antonio history…

1880
The first issue of the San Antonio Daily Times is printed.

1956
Inoculation with Salk polio vaccine of about 30,000 Lackland AFB military and civilian personnel began today following the incidence of five paralytic cases at the base.

1985
San Antonio’s City Council passes a no-smoking ordinance for city concert halls banning cigar, cigarette and pipe smoking and the lighting of matches except in restrooms.  Smoking is already prohibited at Municipal Auditorium since it is considered a theater.  Promoter Jack Orbin of Stone City Productions called the council’s actions “clearly unconstitutional” and said he is pursuing legal remedies.

August 17 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Major General Henry Trueman Allen, assigned as commander of Camp Travis, is expected to report for duty about the middle of next week. General Allen is well known to many officers at the post, having been stationed at Fort Bliss, in this department, as colonel of the Thirteenth cavalry. No word has been received at Fort Sam Houston as to General Parker’s successor as department commander.

1956
The Edwards Aquifer reaches its lowest recorded level at 612.5 feet.

1980
Fleetwood Mac comes to the Convention Center to promote their new album “Tusk.”  Rocky Burnette, whose cousin Billy would join Fleetwood Mac in 1991, opened the show.

August 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With only two days remaining before the close of the whirlwind campaign for the $10,000 War Recreation Fund, members of the San Antonio Rotary Club will “get busy and busier’’ to raise the money. Though the reports at today’s luncheon, which was held at the Menger Hotel, were not as gratifying
as those of Tuesday, there is no discouragement, but rather a determination to win out in the end.

1956
A man who threatened to blow up the Bexar County National Bank with nitroglycerine escaped with $2,000 in a daring daylight holdup today.

1987
The doors close for the final time on the downtown Joske’s store to prepare for a storewide renovation and transformation into Dillard’s.