Blog Archives

June 14 in San Antonio history…

1952
San Antonio’s garbage workers went back to their jobs this morning after a sit-down strike that lasted two hours and 27 minutes but it appears that the controversy is still red hot. Sixty-one drivers and 122 pickup men refused to go out on their routes this morning because they want Ed Marceau, superintendent, who had handed in his letter of resignation, to come back, and they want changes in the truck maintenance setup.

1956>May 11 in San Antonio history...
City philatelists flocked to the post offices today to be first in line when the new Alamo postage stamps (right) went on sale at 7 a.m.

1992
Due to a very rainy winter and spring, the water in the J-17 Edwards Aquifer monitoring well reaches an all-time high of 703.3 feet.

May 17 in San Antonio history…

1887
Ignatius Coyle smashes the image of Saint Theresa at the Alamo Church and is arrested by Captain Tom Rife.

1917 – World War I
Representative Slayden has received communications from patriotic and charitably inclined citizens proposing to locate colonies of Belgians in Texas, where lands are cheap and fertile.  The Belgian minister responded today, saying, “Answering your friends’ inquiry, I have the honor to inform you that the Belgian government does not favor or endorse the exodus to foreign countries of its citizens.  As you certainly will understand, Belgium will need after the war is over all her able-bodied people to help to rebuild the ruins and the devastations which occurred during the great European conflict.  However, I appreciate the charitable initiative of your citizens.”

1956
“The Biggest Rock and Roll Show of 1956 comes to Municipal Auditorium, featuring Bill Haley & His Comets, The Platters, Joe Turner, The Teen-agers, The Colts, The Teen Queens, Bo Diddley, Clyde McPhatter, The Drifters, The Flamingos, LaVern Baker, and Red Prysock & his Rock and Roll Orchestra.

May 4 in San Antonio history…

1917
Adams & Adams were elected architects for the San Antonio School Board at an adjourned meeting of that body held today at noon in the school board offices. While Ralph D. Cameron, employed by the former board during the past year of intensive construction, and architect of the new Main Avenue High School, was highly recommended by the former board for the excellent work he had done, the present board chose to select a new name.

1956
The San Antonio Register reports on the recent removal of segregation signs from buses of the San Antonio Transit Company, saying, “Actually, although the signs had been in place until Wednesday, last week, segregation had not been enforced on city buses in a number of years.”

1960
Due to segregation protests for the sixth consecutive business day, Joske’s closes all three of their cafeterias to the public.  The Camellia Room and Chuck Wagon, which are for whites only, and the integrated basement cafeteria which will now be for Joske’s employees only.  Joske’s issues this statement:  “For 88 years Joske’s has, as a matter of basic policy, conformed to the established and accepted customs of this community. When those customs and practices change, Joske’s will change with them. Because of the continuing demonstrations involving the Camellia room and because Joske’s wishes its customers to shop in an atmosphere of harmony, all Joske restaurant service will be temporarily discontinued. In the meantime, Joske’s will continue to participate, as it has during the past several months, in all civic efforts to bring about a solution to the community problem affecting restaurant facilities.” 

May 3 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Sheppard amendment is approved by the Senate conference committee on the Army appropriations bill, providing $330,000 for the purchase of more than one thousand acres adjoining Ft. Sam Houston.  The Senate conferees also approved a $30,000 item to provide for additional hospital facilities.

1956
Henry B. Gonzalez announced he was resigning from the city council to run for state senator from San Antonio.

1963
Tony Bennett signs autographs in Platter Palace on the lower level of Wonderland Shopping City for fans, and then performs his concert,  “A Swingin’ Evening with Tony Bennett” at Municipal Auditorium at 8:30  p.m.  One lucky fan, and a guest of her choice, gets to have lunch with Tony in the Mr. Checkers restaurant before the show.

April 27 in San Antonio history…

1914
The City Council gives authority to the Scientific Society to establish a zoological garden in Brackenridge Park.  This is the beginning of the San Antonio Zoo.

1956body_snatchers
The Texas Theater begins showing the sci-fi double feature of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Atomic Man (right).”

1979
During the Battle of Flowers parade, Ira Attebury sprays the crowd with shotgun and semiautomatic rifle fire from a parked motorhome. Two die, 55 are wounded. Attebury commits suicide as SWAT teams close in.

April 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The taking of the first American prisoner of war was reported to the American embassy today through the American consul at Glasgow.

1933burnett
Carol Creighton Burnett is born in San Antonio, near W. Commerce and Rosillo streets.

1956
Segregation was ended on San Antonio buses in line with a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

April 5 in San Antonio history…

1917-World War I
The U.S. Senate passes the war resolution against Germany by a vote of 82 to 6.  The resolution is expected to pass the House today also.

1917
The San Antonio Light reports that Joske’s, Wolff & Marx and Wolfson’s clothing stores have been asked by the Navy Department to permit the opening of recruiting stations in their stores during April 9 – 14 for “Naval Recruiting Week.”  Chief C. O. Evans, chief of local recruiting, has suggested that citizens with automobiles can help by going out into the nearby countryside and bringing to San Antonio any young men desiring to enlist.

1956
The Bexar County [Freeman] Coliseum was desegregated on the order of the board of managers. An announcement declared that there would be no discrimination “based on race, color or creed of persons lawfully on the Coliseum premises.”

March 22 in San Antonio history…

1924
The San Antonio Conservation Society is organized to save the old Market House and the San Antonio River.

1935west_point
“West Point of the Air,” a new movie with scenes filmed at Randolph Field and starring Wallace Beery, Robert Young, Maureen O’Sullivan and Rosalind Russell, holds its world premiere at the Majestic Theater.

1956
In advance of a May 12 Federal Court hearing, the City Council repeals the June 19, 1954 ordinance (No. 20307) prohibiting people of color from city swimming pools.

March 16 in San Antonio history…

1956
City Council promised a delegation of 12 Negroes that action would be taken on the repeal of the “Juneteenth ordinance” from last year designating all but two city swimming pools for whites only. The repeal will come before April 14, the day that San Pedro Pool is scheduled to open.  San Pedro is one of the nine segregated pools.  The repeal ordinance drafted by City Attorney Cadena is also expected to remove any segregation in city buildings during public functions, but will not affect the Alamo Heights swimming pool, which is on city-owned property leased by that municipality.

1960
Six downtown stores and a city-wide drugstore integrate lunch counters and cafeterias. The stores were: Woolworth’s, Kress, Neisner’s, Grant’s, Green’s, McCrory’s Variety Store and Sommer’s Drug Stores.

1971
The Fourth Army, headquartered at Ft. Sam Houston since 1944, is abolished and absorbed into the Fifth Army and the headquarters will move from Chicago to Ft. Sam Houston.  The area covered will span from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.

March 8 in San Antonio history…

1917
Orders were issued today relieving Major B. D. Foulois as chief aviation officer of the Southern Department and designating Capt. Townsend Dodd, now in charge of the First Aero Squadron at Columbus, to succeed him.  Major Foulois will proceed to Washington for duty in the office of the Chief Signal Officer.

1940
Work will start within one week at the traffic control project at Romana Plaza, most congested area in the city, Virden A. Rittgers, city traffic engineer, said today.

1956
San Antonio’s second oldest radio station, KTSA, is sold to Gordon McLendon and the McLendon Investment Corp. by O. R. Mitchell , president of O. R. Mitchell Motors, for $306,000 pending approval by the FCC.