Blog Archives

December 17 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
San Antonio Mayor Sam Bell declares December 17 “Red Cross Day” and calls “upon all loyal and patriotic people residing within said city to observe said day by raising or hoisting Red Cross flags upon all flag poles, public buildings and other prominent public places within said city on said day, that we may by this expression of our sympathy with said cause at least lend some help and encouragement to the officers and members of this great organization that is doing so much to help relieve the sufferings of those who have been maimed, wounded or made destitute by the awful conflict that is now being waged for humanity.”

1926texas
The Texas Theater holds its formal grand opening.  The theater will be opened to the public on December 18.

1971
San Antonio’s Robert E. Lee High School, with Tommy Kramer at quarterback, captures the 4A state championship, 28-27, over Wichita Falls.  This was the first high school game played at the then-brand new Texas Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys.

Advertisements

December 11 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Thirteen members of the Twenty-fourth Infantry, United States Army, found guilty on August 23, were hanged on the military reservation at Fort Sam Houston at 7:17 o’clock this morning.

1926
Olmos Dam is dedicated and opened to traffic.

1949WOAI
WOAI-TV Channel 4 was dedicated today (right). The station begins broadcasting regular programming at 4:45 in the afternoon and signs off at 9:00 pm. The feature program is the SMU-Notre Dame game from Dec. 3.  The program was condensed to 40 minutes by eliminating huddles and time between plays.

December 2 in San Antonio history…

1926
The moss-covered fountain in the patio of the county courthouse, for so long a beautiful relic of history, is to be sent to the Joske Memorial Home to make room for expansion.

1979
The deposed Shah of Iran arrives at Kelly AFB to recuperate from cancer surgery at Wilford Hall.  He would leave the US on December 15 and reside in Panama until March 1980 when he relocated to Egypt.  He died there on July 27, 1980 and is buried in Cairo.

November 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The “dare devil” riders of Motorcycle Company 303 are now stationed at Ft. Sam Houston.  This company is one of three that has been organized for the carrying of dispatches and the execution of daring and dangerous work between battle lines.

1926
San Antonio may have a professional football season of six weeks starting Dec. 15.  Officials of the Buffalo, N.Y. Bisons are reportedly in contact with the owners of League Park in efforts to use the space as a field.

1960
Joske’s debuts their Christmas “Fantasy Land” on the fourth floor of their main store downtown. (Photo courtesy of the Institute of Texan Cultures.)

November 15 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The San Antonio branch of the National League for Woman’s Service has sent out an open letter to the women of surrounding towns asking for their co-operation in supplying the Texas boys at Camp Bowie  with needed woolen garments.  More than fifty letters were mailed today, some going as far away as towns near Corpus Christi.

1926
With charred ruins of buildings and trees stripped of their branches prevailing, a scene of desolation marks the spot today where the French village at Camp Stanley was bombarded during the filming of “Wings.”

1939
Buddy Meyers, blind operator of the courthouse cigar stand, today had returned from Morristown, New Jersey with a real “seeing-eye” dog, the only one of its kind in the city.

 

November 4 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A school for the study of French to be conducted at night and attended by a selected number of enlisted men at Camp Travis will be opened within a short time, headquarters has announced.  The place of holding the sessions and the time of opening will be made known later.

1926
The Texas Historical and Landmarks Assn. and the Sons and Daughters of the Heroes of Texas submitted a petition to the city urging preservation of the Spanish Governor’s Palace at West Commerce and Military Plaza.

1967zachry
Mr. and Mrs. Bertell Zachry, son and daughter-in-law of H.B. Zachry,  became the first guests of the Hilton Palacio de Rio, after they rode Room 522 from the ground as it was hoisted into place by a crane. (right)

October 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A tract of land directly south of San Antonio comprising approximately 1600 acres is being assembled by a committee from the Chamber of Commerce for submission to the War Department as a site for a new aviation field.  This new tract is about six miles away from Kelly Field and directly south of the city.  It is bounded on the north by the Upson Road, on the east by the Southton Road and on the west by the Goliad Road.

1926
The Witte Museum is opened to the public.

1929
“It’s the greatest thing since sliced bread!”
Richter’s Bakery begins advertising sliced Butter Krust bread along with the traditionally unsliced loaves.

August 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A sudden windstorm hits San Antonio causing a building under construction at Kelly Field to collapse.  Henry Essary, a carpenter, is killed and five other men are injured.

1926
Installation of the flood gates in the Olmos creek dam north of the city was begun today, assuring San Antonio permanent protection from floods.

1958
The Ink Spots give their penultimate performance of a weeklong engagement at the King of Clubs on San Antonio’s east side.

June 9 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Registration in the National League for Woman’s Service began in San Antonio today. The first step is a movement to secure the assistance of every woman in the city, stimulating more efficient work, co-ordinating all endeavors, giving every individual her part in the great undertaking on which this country is launched, was taken at the mass meeting of women this morning in the Gunter Hotel.

1918
In broad daylight under the eyes of detectives and scores of patrolmen, a daring San Antonio thief stole a policeman’s horse, tired directly in front of police headquarters. A general pursuit failed to catch him.

1926
Mayor Tobin outlined plans to convert the downtown river into a veritable fairyland, rivaling in beauty the canals of Venice.

June 4 in San Antonio history…

1909
Orders have been issued changing the name of Aue, a station on the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad, to Leon Springs.

1917 – World War I
A conference of county and city authorities was held today to determine what course of action to pursue with reference to the moral clean-up campaign demanded by Secretary of War Baker as a condition precedent to obtaining divisional training camps for San Antonio. It was unanimously agreed that whatever course of action may be desired by the government should and would have the fullest measure of co-operation by the joint action of the local authorities. Mayor Sa/n C. Bell was authorized to issue the formal statement to this effect. Notice to Property Owners. In order to show that this is not to be an empty promise it was understod that notices would be served Monday afternoon on persons owning property in the trans-San Pedro district, informing them that laws covering the rental of property for immoral purposes would be enforced* At the same time notices will be sent cut to men known to be operating gambling houses that they must cease doing so at4or.ee and that violation of this ordervwill be followed by raids and the destruction of gambling paraphernalia. A determined

1926
The Aztec Theatre opened promising “a totally new form of entertainment.”