Blog Archives

May 23 in San Antonio history…

1918
Miss Katherine Stinson, San Antonio aviatrix, started a flight from Chicago to New York with mail at 7:37 a.m. today.  Miss Stinson, 22, is averaging 71 miles per hour.  The flight is being made to establish a long-distance, non-stop record.

1968
The San Antonio Express newspaper reports that County Commissioner A. J. Ploch has received death threats as a result of controversial comments he made about the CBS News program “Hunger in America,” filmed in San Antonio, that aired two nights ago.

1992helmet
The San Antonio Riders play their final game and lose to Sacramento, 27-21, in front of 19,273 fans in San Marcos’s Bobcat Stadium.

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April 24 in San Antonio history…

1891battle_flowers1891
The first Battle of Flowers parade is held (right).

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Light prints a story from the London Times by special cable that describes the funeral held in France yesterday for Rittmeister Manfred von Richtofen, better known as the “Red Baron.”  Richtofen was shot down on April 21.

1992
La Semana Alegre’s East Stage features guitar wizards Peter Frampton and Eric Johnson.

November 21 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Red Cross patriotic mass meeting is held in Beethoven Hall.

1963
President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy are in San Antonio to dedicate the Aerospace Medical Health Center at Brooks Air Force Base. He is assassinated in Dallas the following day.

1992
Athens, Georgia-based band, R.E.M., films the video for their song “Everybody Hurts” on the unopened lower level of the $270 million “Downtown Y” highway expansion project, on I-10 between Cincinnati and Colorado streets.

October 6 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Mayes Electric Wonder baseball board used last year at the Grand Opera House will be used by the Empire Theater to “watch” the World Series between the Chicago White Sox and the New York Giants.

1968
HemisFair ’68 comes to a close with a final total of 6,384, 482 attendees.

1992
The Hearst Corp. announces it will purchase the Express-News for $185 million in cash and the San Antonio Light newspaper will be sold.

 

 

July 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
Iconoclast William Cowper Brann is fired as editor of the San Antonio Express newspaper.

1917 – World War I
Declaring that thousands of men of draft age evaded registration and have escaped the call to the army, Attorney General Gregory today instructed all United States attorneys to begin a round-up of the slackers and start criminal prosecutions.

1992
Foley’s department store opens in Rolling Oaks Mall.

July 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Adjutant General Hutchings at noon today announced the list of divisions and the quota of men that must be furnished by each county or division under the draft act. The total quota for the state of Texas is 30,545 which is split up among the various divisions. Under the allotment as announced, San Antonio must furnish 151 men to the new army while Bexar county, outside of San Antonio, will be called upon for 238 men.

1957
Gasoline prices dropped today to 18 cents a gallon in the recent gas war. Drivers are cheering but station owners wear long faces.

1992
James Taylor plays a concert at Sea World of Texas.

June 14 in San Antonio history…

1952
San Antonio’s garbage workers went back to their jobs this morning after a sit-down strike that lasted two hours and 27 minutes but it appears that the controversy is still red hot. Sixty-one drivers and 122 pickup men refused to go out on their routes this morning because they want Ed Marceau, superintendent, who had handed in his letter of resignation, to come back, and they want changes in the truck maintenance setup.

1956>May 11 in San Antonio history...
City philatelists flocked to the post offices today to be first in line when the new Alamo postage stamps (right) went on sale at 7 a.m.

1992
Due to a very rainy winter and spring, the water in the J-17 Edwards Aquifer monitoring well reaches an all-time high of 703.3 feet.

May 22 in San Antonio history…

1846
The first U.S. Post Office is established in San Antonio, with James Truehart as postmaster.

1959
San Antonio’s 200,000th telephone was installed today In the residence of Mr, and Mrs. Norman E. Pryor of 130 Westchester St.

1992
After 30 years as the King of late night television, Johnny Carson’s final show as host of the “Tonight Show” is broadcast on KMOL Channel 4.

March 14 in San Antonio history…

1917
Following the reading of an apology by Fred Meister, charged Saturday night with having “abused and cursed the President of the United States,” the complaint against him was dismissed this afternoon.

1930San Antonio Light photo courtesy of the San Antonio Express-News
Mayor C. M. Chambers broke ground today for the new home of the San Antonio Light, which is now being erected at Broadway and 4th Street.  The Light‘s new plant will be one of the most modern in the country. [Photo courtesy of the San Antonio Express-News]

1992
Fiesta Texas holds a soft opening today, offering reporters and intrepid souls rides on The Rattler, the tallest and fastest wooden roller coaster in the world. (It held this title until 1994, when The Rattler’s first drop was drastically shortened from 166 to 124 feet, resulting in a reduction of its top speed from 73 to 65 miles per hour.)

December 3 in San Antonio history…

1869
The Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word formally dedicate Santa Rosa Hospital, then known as Charity Hospital, located at Cameron and Commerce Streets.  An advertisement in the San Antonio Express promised that the Infirmary would open to “all persons without distinction of nationality or creed.”

1983
Jazz flugelhornist Chuck Mangione plays a concert in Laurie Auditorium.  It is not known if Hank Hill attended the show.

1992
While in San Antonio to film his Christmas special, “Bob Hope ‘s 4-Star Fiesta Christmas From San Antonio”, entertainer Bob Hope visits Bob Hope Elementary School at 3022 Reforma Drive – the only elementary school in the nation named for him.  Second-grader Jennifer Ramirez, 7,  presents him with a red school t-shirt and a kiss on the cheek.  “Is it true you’re going to build us a swimming pool?” one boy asked. School officials hid their embarrassment and quickly led the students in a chorus of “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.”