Blog Archives

June 18 in San Antonio history…

1856
A caravan of camels went down Main Street on their way to Camp Verde.

1932
Less than an hour after a Texas League game that saw the San Antonio Indians lose, 5-3, to the Dallas Steers, a fire is reported in the stands at League Field located at Josephine and Isleta streets.  Less than three minutes after he flames were first seen in the northwest section of the grandstand, they had spread over the entire structure, which was built to seat 7,500 people. Firemen believed a cigarette stub may have caused the fire. Homer H. Hammond, president of the San Antonio Baseball Club, estimated the loss to the club at $58,000, including equipment for night games.

1978TravisClub3
The 66-year-old Elks Building at Navarro and Pecan streets (right) becomes the first building to be imploded in San Antonio.  The building was the former home of the Travis Club and was immortalized on the boxes for Travis Club cigars.

June 6 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
San Antonio and Bexar county ’s potential military strength as shown by the registration yesterday of men between the ages of 21 and 31 years, is 14,733. This is based on official returns of the registrars in all the county precincts and in all but one of the city precincts. The missing precinct is No. 158, where it is estimated the total registration was approximately 200. The total for the city, estimating 200 as the registration in Precinct 23 will be 12,210.

1932
Future astronaut, David Scott (right), is the first boy born to an officer stationed at Randolph AFB and is given Randolph as a middle name.

1987
The Bangles, with opening act Cutting Crew, play a show in Sunken Garden Theater.

January 17 in San Antonio history…

1917
Oysters are served at the annual alumni meeting of St. Mary’s College, thus beginning the tradition of Oyster Bake.

1932
The new Central Catholic High School is dedicated.

1976
Legendary newsman Walter Cronkite appears with the San Antonio Symphony to narrate Aaron Copeland’s “A Lincoln Portrait.”

December 15 in San Antonio history…

1879
Buffalo Bill Cody brings his Combination acting troupe to San Antonio and entertains at the Casino Club.

1932
Legendary R&B singer Jesse Belvin is born in San Antonio.

1941
Fiesta San Jacinto was called off for 1942 by interested parties at a meeting at the Municipal Auditorium.

December 5 in San Antonio history…

1932
Injuries sustained in a highway accident near Schulenburg caused the death of Mrs. Nettie Houston Bringhurst, 403 Cleveland Court, Alamo Heights, last living daughter of Gen. Sam Houston, hero of the Texas Revolution.

1965
The San Antonio Lee Volunteeers advance to the State Class 4A Semifinals with a 26-21 win over Corsicana at Austin.

1990
Ground is broken on the Alamodome, located on the former Alamo Iron Works site and adjacent property, on the east side of Interstate 37 and across from the HemisFair Park area.

October 22 in San Antonio history…

1909
President Taft comes to San Antonio to dedicate the chapel at Ft. Sam Houston.

1932
The name of  the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad is changed to the Texas & New Orleans, a division of Southern Pacific.

1949
L. Truett Pratt is born in San Antonio.  The Jefferson High School alumnus will find fame when he and Jerry McClain are chosen to sing the new theme song to the hit TV show “Happy Days.”  The tune gets to #5 on the Billboard charts in 1976.

September 4 in San Antonio history

1932
San Antonio switches over to the dial telephone system. Telephone exchanges change from Crockett, Travis, Mission and Woodlawn to Belmont, Cathedral, Fannin, Garfield, Kenwood, Lambert, Parkview and Pershing.

1944gi_bill344
The Serviceman’s Readjustment Act, better known as the G. I. Bill of Rights, goes into effect today.  According to M. R. Gill, supervisor for the San Antonio district of the Texas Unemployment Compensation Commission, the agency which is to administer the law, an initial claim load of 1,000 is anticipated in San Antonio.

1957
The Edsel goes on sale at Winerich Motors, 1820 Broadway.  Despite Ford Motor Company’s investment of $400 million in the new car, it was such a flop that production ceased only two years later, on Nov. 19, 1959.

August 12 in San Antonio history…

1915
Police cars were equipped with sirens similar to those used by the fire department. They were to be used only while the cars were responding to emergency calls.

1922
The second radio station in San Antonio, WCAR, begins broadcasting from 324 N. Navarro St.  It is later renamed KTSA (which stands for Kum To San Antonio).

1932
The San Antonio postoffice band has accepted an invitation to entertain and be entertained at the Kendall County Fair. Postmaster P.G. Lucas has announced. John L. Meyer, director of the band, will be in charge.

July 22 in San Antonio history…

1932
Qualified Negro voters in Bexar County will be permitted to vote in the Democratic primary election tomorrow under terms of a mandatory injunction.  Attorney Carl Wright Johnson argued that the courts have granted relief to white voters deprived of the privilege of voting and that the same relief should be open to negro voters deprived of such privilege.

1942
A photostatic copy of the original floor plan of an old Spanish fort in San Antonio, drawn in 1805 by Francisco Adam, was brought to San Antonio recently by Bascom Giles, commissioner of the general land office. Situated on the present site of city hall, the fort was more than 300 feet long.

1981
The San Antonio Light says that the body of a San Antonio woman missing since June 10 was located yesterday in Sutherland Springs with the help of a Dallas psychic.

June 9 in San Antonio history…

1932
The Southwestern Bell Telephone people are busy planning a campaign for the event they call the Big Conversion. They are getting ready to switch over to the dial telephone system.

1950
The South Loop 13 Drive-In Theater, the fifth in the city, opens with “The Outlaw”.

2008
All four ramps of the 281/410 interchange ramp project are completed.