Blog Archives

August 25 in San Antonio history…

1852
St. Mary’s Institute (now University) is founded near San Fernando with 12 male students.

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Express newspaper has set aside $100,000 to be used in combating the crime of lynching in this country. The money is to be used in rewards for the apprehension, conviction and punishment of persons who are guilty of mob violence.  This fund of $100,000, and the offer of reward, will be maintained and in effect for a period of five years from August 3, 1918.

1939
A Communist rally at Municipal Auditorium turns into a riot when a crowd of 5,000 stone-throwing citizens converges on the building.

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July 6 in San Antonio history…

1861
The Texas Order of the Sons of Hermann is founded in San Antonio.

1918 – World War I
Rogers Hornsby, star shortstop of the St. Louis Cardinals, was ordered today by the local draft board No. 1 to engage in an essential occupation or be placed in class 1-A of the draft.  He is the first major league player to receive a work or fight notice under the new ruling of the provost marshal general.  Hornsby was born in Fort Worth.

1939
Mayor Maury Maverick announced today that the operation of the chili stands on Haymarket Plaza by San Antonio’s “chili queens” would be suspended for ten days pending complete compliance with city health regulations.  The mayor visited the plaza last night and outlined his plan to place six stands on the plaza and and central sterilizing plant in the market house.

April 21 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The patriotic Battle of Flowers and Red Cross parade to commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto will start promptly at 4 o’clock this afternoon.  The hour has been changed from 4:30 to 4 o’clock in order to enable the soldiers who take part to return to camp in time for mess, and military promptness will be observed in the movement.

1939
Mae West, in town for a one-week engagement at the Majestic Theatre, receives an invitation for “La Noche de Fiesta” from event chairman Atlee Ayers.  The invitation is painted on a tortilla.

1944
Texas Governor Coke Stevenson speaks to a crowd of 10,000 for the annual Alamo Pilgrimage, saying , “Occasions like this make people realize more than ever the struggles and sacrifices necessary to achieve a great and purposeful aim such as a war for right and justice.”

November 22 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
An additional aviation unit is to be established on the selected tract of land adjacent to Berg’s Mill, according to Col. W. D. Chitty, commandant of Kelly Field, who returned last night from a conference in Washington.  This property, which was assembled by the Chamber of Commerce, has been under governmental consideration for some time but has finally been passed upon by the War Department and definite authorization for the establishment of the third aviation unit has been given.

1939joskes
With a grand ceremony including fireworks, high school bands and 300 guests of honor, Joske’s dedicates their newly renovated and expanded “Big Store” (right) at the corner of Commerce and Alamo streets.

1963
San Antonio’s Catholic churches were packed with mourners for President Kennedy as soon as the news of his assassination was learned.  Many San Antonians lined the streets as his motorcade passed through the city just yesterday.

 

November 15 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The San Antonio branch of the National League for Woman’s Service has sent out an open letter to the women of surrounding towns asking for their co-operation in supplying the Texas boys at Camp Bowie  with needed woolen garments.  More than fifty letters were mailed today, some going as far away as towns near Corpus Christi.

1926
With charred ruins of buildings and trees stripped of their branches prevailing, a scene of desolation marks the spot today where the French village at Camp Stanley was bombarded during the filming of “Wings.”

1939
Buddy Meyers, blind operator of the courthouse cigar stand, today had returned from Morristown, New Jersey with a real “seeing-eye” dog, the only one of its kind in the city.

 

October 25 in San Antonio history…

1939
The River Beautification Project, with Robert Hugman as architect, breaks ground.  This project creates the San Antonio Riverwalk as we know it today.

1955
An early morning fire at Travis Park Methodist Church caused an estimated $75,000 damage to the downtown landmark.

1986
The Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular is shown for the first time ever at the Woodlawn Theater.

October 12 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The men at Camp Travis are to carry wooden rifles, due to the inability to obtain real rifles for bayonet and other practice, resulting in a decision to equip the infantry brigades with wooden guns. An order has been placed for many thousands.of these make-believe weapons and before many days pass the men will be engaged in fencing, and bayonet practice using the wooden guns.
They will also be provided long round sticks on one end of which is a small rope tied into a knot. This is used as a defense stick in connection with bayonet practice.

1939
Restoration on La Villita is begun with O’Neil Ford as architect.

1960
Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy makes a campaign stop in San Antonio. Kennedy told the crowd gathered in front of the Alamo, “In 1960, the cause of all mankind is the cause of all Americans.”

August 11 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The war of the Cibolo River is at an end. With the spectacular clash  between the Red and the Blue forces of Camp Funston student officers in the trenches of the Fifty-seventh In­fantry Friday night, four days of gruelling mimic warfare for the stu­dents was brought to a close.

1922
San Antonio’s second radio station (WCAR) begins broadcasting from 324 N. Navarro St. It is later renamed KTSA. (License date 5/9/22)

1939
Bexar County Commissioners Court in a special resolution passed this morning, censured the city of San Antonio for its “ill-advised” granting of a permit for a Communist Party meeting in the Municipal Auditorium.

July 17 in San Antonio history…

1913
The tunnel through the “big hill” on the line of the Fredericksburg Railroad was completed and is 910 feet long.

1917 – WWI
Mayor Sam Bell issues a proclamation to the boys and girls of San Antonio, in hopes of raising a donation of one million pennies.
To the Boys and Girls of San Antonio:
The men and women of San Antonio have shown splendid patriotism and self-denial in their recent contributions to the Red Cross. The boys and girls of San Antonio can do even better than they did.  A movement, under the auspices of The San Antonio Light, to collect one million pennies from children to be used in aiding the war suffering children of Belgium, has been started in San Antonio, organization to be known as The Happy Tribe has been proposed, the motto of this organization being: “To make the world a happier place.” Through this organization every boy and girl is offered an opportunity to give their pennies to the good cause. The plan is approved by the American Red Cross and the fund will be distributed by that Society.”

1939
On the anniversary of his famed flight to Ireland, Douglas “Wrong Way” Corrigan takes as his bride, his childhood sweetheart, Miss Elizabeth Marvin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Marvin,  507 Terrell Rd.  They marry in the chapel of the First Baptist Church.

March 11 in San Antonio history…

1811
The Viceroy declares that the Villa San Fernando, the Presidio San Antonio, and the grounds of the old Mission de Valero are all to be incorporated together under the name San Antonio de Bexar.

1917
The San Antonio Light reports that, last night in the lobby of the Gunter Hotel, General Pershing was presented with “Captain Jack,” a black charger, after a speech by Capt. J. E Labatt.

1939
The groundbreaking for the Alamo Cenotaph, designed by sculptor Pompeo Coppini,  is held today.