Blog Archives

November 29 in San Antonio history…

1963
Linus Baer and the Lee Volunteers outlast Warren McVea and the Brackenridge Eagles, 55-48, in what would later be voted the greatest football game ever played in San Antonio.

1979trek_79
A $10 per ticket premiere of “Star Trek: The Motion Picture” will be held at two theaters tonight to benefit the San Antonio Easter Seals Chapter.  The San Antonio premiere of the movie will be held at 8:30 the Cine Cinco theater in Windsor Park Mall and 7:30 at the Northwest Six theaters.

1988
The Marriott Rivercenter hotel holds its grand opening festivities.

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November 22 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
An additional aviation unit is to be established on the selected tract of land adjacent to Berg’s Mill, according to Col. W. D. Chitty, commandant of Kelly Field, who returned last night from a conference in Washington.  This property, which was assembled by the Chamber of Commerce, has been under governmental consideration for some time but has finally been passed upon by the War Department and definite authorization for the establishment of the third aviation unit has been given.

1939joskes
With a grand ceremony including fireworks, high school bands and 300 guests of honor, Joske’s dedicates their newly renovated and expanded “Big Store” (right) at the corner of Commerce and Alamo streets.

1963
San Antonio’s Catholic churches were packed with mourners for President Kennedy as soon as the news of his assassination was learned.  Many San Antonians lined the streets as his motorcade passed through the city just yesterday.

 

November 21 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Red Cross patriotic mass meeting is held in Beethoven Hall.

1963
President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy are in San Antonio to dedicate the Aerospace Medical Health Center at Brooks Air Force Base. He is assassinated in Dallas the following day.

1992
Athens, Georgia-based band, R.E.M., films the video for their song “Everybody Hurts” on the unopened lower level of the $270 million “Downtown Y” highway expansion project, on I-10 between Cincinnati and Colorado streets.

November 18 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Commissions are ready for the Camp Stanley student officers.  Before they are announced, however, the student officers must complete one more week of strenuous training.  Announcement will be made on the morning of Tuesday, November 27, and at 8 o’clock the men will be sworn in.

1963
The San Antonio Light reports that open house for the dedication by President Kennedy of the new Air Force School of Aerospace medical buildings at Brooks Air Force Base will start at 11 a.m. Thursday. A variety of space age displays will be on view, including a display of the X-15 research rocket plane and the X20 Dyna-Soar manned space craft.

1985
The first Calvin & Hobbes cartoon is printed in the San Antonio Express-News (right).

September 8 in San Antonio history…

1936
Demetrio Jose “Joe” Esquivel (right) dies in San Antonio.  In 1882, Esquivel, along with his brother Tony, drove cattle from Texas to Wyoming, where their skills with horses caught the attention of William F. Cody, who was assembling his troupe for the first season of the Wild West exhibition. Joe was hired as “chief of cowboys,” and Tony was hired as a bucking-horse rider and trick rider. The brothers, whose father was Hispanic and mother was Polish, were born in Panna Maria.

1960
Sears on Romana Plaza opens their new three-level “ultra-modern” parking garage. (The downtown Central Library still uses this garage.)

1963
Archbishop Lucey dedicates new Catholic Chancery building at 9123 Lorene Lane on city’s North Side.

July 12 in San Antonio history…

1907
The new state law in effect today requires San Antonio automobile owners to report to the county clerk, register their names and obtain a number for their machine.  County Clerk Newton says this law affects all vehicles – gas, electric and even motorcycles.

1923
The newly installed electric street lamps in Alamo Heights lit up the town for the first time tonight when all 63 lights were turned on.  The new lighting system was installed at a cost to the San Antonio Public Service Company of between $1,500 and $1,600.  The city of Alamo Heights will pay an annual rental on each lamp.

1963
San Antonio banks let it be known Thursday they are willing to lend $4.5 million, the sum required to launch the HemisFair project.

July 3 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A contract has been let for the erection of two Army Y.M.C.A. buildings at Camp Funston to cost, equipped, about $6000 each.  This will give the Y.M.C.A. there three recreation homes of what is known as the brigade type of building.  Work will be started tomorrow with orders to hasten construction.

1963
Formal announcement of a 130-acre downtown site for the proposed HemisFair was made by James M. Gaines, chairman of the site selection committee.

1964
Natural Bridge Caverns opens to the public.

July 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Two of the army airplanes that left San Antonio this morning for a trip to Waco, reached here shortly before noon, while one was forced to descend
near Austin and another at Bartlett. After one of the machines had reached Waco and landed safely the second, driven by Capt. M. Kirby, of the United States aviation corps, was caught in an air current while preparing to land, about two hundred feet from the ground and his machine completely destroyed. Captain Kirby being badly shaken up, and a companion, Captain Ralph Fairchild, who was riding as a passenger, was rendered unconscious and taken to a local sanitarium.

1944
War bond pushers announced Gene Autry and Red Skelton as special guests at a $1,000-bond-a-plate dinner at the St. Anthony Hotel.

1963
A total of 61 percent of all business establishments signed pledges that they would voluntarily desegregate, according to a report of the City Council’s committee on desegregation.

June 27 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The second contingent of American troops arrived and disembarked this morning at an unnamed port in France. The troops landed amid the frantic cheers of the people who had gathered for hours before in anticipation of duplicating yesterday’s surprise. Enthusiasm rose to fever pitch when it was learned that the transports and convoys had successfully passed the submarine
zone. The port was speedily beflagged in honor of the occasion. Major General Pershing, the American commander, is expected tomorrow.

1963
San Antonio moved again toward complete desegregation today after 173 restaurants, 23 motels and 9 hotels quietly opened their doors to African-Americans.

1985
The Majestic Theater features a concert with Johnny Winter, his brother, Edgar, and Gregg Allman.

June 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
If San Antonio wishes to retain its prominence as a center of military activities it must undergo a thorough vice clean-up, according to a statement made today by Raymond Fosdick, chairman of the War Department committee on training camp activities. Unless this is done San Antonio will lose its prospects of being designated as a site for one of the big training camps. Going even further than that, Mr. Fosdick said that Leon Springs and Fort Sam Houston would be stripped of everything but physical property unless the demands were complied with. If the clean-up is made, San Antonio will retain its army activities and these will be added to materially.

1963
The San Antonio Public Library’s Westfall branch library opens.

1966
City Council decided today to hold a referendum on whether the city’s water should be fluoridated and selected July 9 as the election date.  The action came after City Clerk Jake Inselmann told the council a petition calling on the council to either rescind its April 7 fluoridation ordinance or call an election met all legal requirements.