Blog Archives

July 12 in San Antonio history…

1907
The new state law in effect today requires San Antonio automobile owners to report to the county clerk, register their names and obtain a number for their machine.  County Clerk Newton says this law affects all vehicles – gas, electric and even motorcycles.

1923
The newly installed electric street lamps in Alamo Heights lit up the town for the first time tonight when all 63 lights were turned on.  The new lighting system was installed at a cost to the San Antonio Public Service Company of between $1,500 and $1,600.  The city of Alamo Heights will pay an annual rental on each lamp.

1963
San Antonio banks let it be known Thursday they are willing to lend $4.5 million, the sum required to launch the HemisFair project.

July 3 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A contract has been let for the erection of two Army Y.M.C.A. buildings at Camp Funston to cost, equipped, about $6000 each.  This will give the Y.M.C.A. there three recreation homes of what is known as the brigade type of building.  Work will be started tomorrow with orders to hasten construction.

1963
Formal announcement of a 130-acre downtown site for the proposed HemisFair was made by James M. Gaines, chairman of the site selection committee.

1964
Natural Bridge Caverns opens to the public.

July 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Two of the army airplanes that left San Antonio this morning for a trip to Waco, reached here shortly before noon, while one was forced to descend
near Austin and another at Bartlett. After one of the machines had reached Waco and landed safely the second, driven by Capt. M. Kirby, of the United States aviation corps, was caught in an air current while preparing to land, about two hundred feet from the ground and his machine completely destroyed. Captain Kirby being badly shaken up, and a companion, Captain Ralph Fairchild, who was riding as a passenger, was rendered unconscious and taken to a local sanitarium.

1944
War bond pushers announced Gene Autry and Red Skelton as special guests at a $1,000-bond-a-plate dinner at the St. Anthony Hotel.

1963
A total of 61 percent of all business establishments signed pledges that they would voluntarily desegregate, according to a report of the City Council’s committee on desegregation.

June 27 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The second contingent of American troops arrived and disembarked this morning at an unnamed port in France. The troops landed amid the frantic cheers of the people who had gathered for hours before in anticipation of duplicating yesterday’s surprise. Enthusiasm rose to fever pitch when it was learned that the transports and convoys had successfully passed the submarine
zone. The port was speedily beflagged in honor of the occasion. Major General Pershing, the American commander, is expected tomorrow.

1963
San Antonio moved again toward complete desegregation today after 173 restaurants, 23 motels and 9 hotels quietly opened their doors to African-Americans.

1985
The Majestic Theater features a concert with Johnny Winter, his brother, Edgar, and Gregg Allman.

June 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
If San Antonio wishes to retain its prominence as a center of military activities it must undergo a thorough vice clean-up, according to a statement made today by Raymond Fosdick, chairman of the War Department committee on training camp activities. Unless this is done San Antonio will lose its prospects of being designated as a site for one of the big training camps. Going even further than that, Mr. Fosdick said that Leon Springs and Fort Sam Houston would be stripped of everything but physical property unless the demands were complied with. If the clean-up is made, San Antonio will retain its army activities and these will be added to materially.

1963
The San Antonio Public Library’s Westfall branch library opens.

1966
City Council decided today to hold a referendum on whether the city’s water should be fluoridated and selected July 9 as the election date.  The action came after City Clerk Jake Inselmann told the council a petition calling on the council to either rescind its April 7 fluoridation ordinance or call an election met all legal requirements.

May 24 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
John W. Tobin and City Clerk Fred Fries have issued a joint call for a final meeting of the presiding judges who are to serve as registrars in the various places to take the military census June 5. The meeting of the registrars from the 44 country precincts will be held Saturday, June 2, at 10 a.m. in the Commissioners’ Courtroom while that of the registrars for the city precincts will be held June 4, at 10 a. m. in the council chamber at the city hall.

1963
Tonight is the grand opening of the Roaring 20’s Teen Club (formerly Shadowlands), three miles north of Loop 410 on Blanco Road.  Along with Gene Thomas, headliners will be The Missiles band and vocal group along with San Antonio’s own Denny Ezba.  This will mark the first time that a Teen Nite Spot has been put into operation and we’re betting everybody will dig the idea.

1980
Hipp’s Bubble Room at 1411 McCullough closes.

May 3 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Sheppard amendment is approved by the Senate conference committee on the Army appropriations bill, providing $330,000 for the purchase of more than one thousand acres adjoining Ft. Sam Houston.  The Senate conferees also approved a $30,000 item to provide for additional hospital facilities.

1956
Henry B. Gonzalez announced he was resigning from the city council to run for state senator from San Antonio.

1963
Tony Bennett signs autographs in Platter Palace on the lower level of Wonderland Shopping City for fans, and then performs his concert,  “A Swingin’ Evening with Tony Bennett” at Municipal Auditorium at 8:30  p.m.  One lucky fan, and a guest of her choice, gets to have lunch with Tony in the Mr. Checkers restaurant before the show.

April 29 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Departing from a traditional policy formed at its inception, the Republic will raise its army of 2,000,000 men by selective conscription. The draft army bill passed both House and Senate shortly before midnight; the House by 397 to 24, and the Senate by 81 to 8.

1963State-2
Demolition is begun on the State Theater on the northwest corner of Flores and Houston streets (right). This theater was originally named the Majestic and opened in 1913.   Acts such as  Mae West, The Marx Brothers and Houdini all appeared there. The name was changed to the State when the current Majestic Theater was constructed in 1929.

1976
The Daughters of the Republic of Texas announce that a 49-year old plaque honoring Clara Driscoll was stolen “about a month ago” off the face of the Alamo where it had been relocated earlier this year.  Thieves were able to pry the plaque loose despite it having been anchored with bolts six inches deep in the stone wall.  The DRT notified police about the missing plaque but there had been no publicity, except a tiny classified newspaper ad saying: “Lost. Clara Driscoll plaque from the Alamo. Finder return. No questions asked.”

April 14 in San Antonio history…

1880
Anthony Dominic Pellicer, the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese of San Antonio, dies.

1917
The San Antonio Light reports that General Pershing threw out the first pitch (to Mayor Clinton Brown) to begin the season yesterday at League Park. However the San Antonio Bronchos lost to the Beaumont Oilers, 7 to 4.

1963
The first Starving Artist art show is organized by Rev. Paul Soupiset to raise funds for the food program run by the Little Church of La Villita.

December 16 in San Antonio history…

1938
Robert H. H. Hugman is named the official architect of the River Beautification Project.

1946stag_night
Joske’s offers a “Stag Night,” from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., allowing men to do Christmas shopping “without rushing and without women!”

1963
Four Air Force airmen ended a 42-day space cabin experiment today at the Brooks AFB Aerospace School of Medicine.  Thirty days of the experiment were spent in a pure oxygen atmosphere.  Each of the airmen was presented with a certificate of appreciation and two photographs of the late President John F. Kennedy, who dedicated the school the day before he was assassinated in Dallas.