Blog Archives

June 28 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The St. Anthony Hotel holds the formal opening of their Top O’ the Town roof garden, promising “The Most Wonderful Night San Antonio Has Ever Seen” and “A Dinner That Would Have Pleased Lucullus.”

1982 
The St. Anthony Hotel, due to reopen in January after a $10 million renovation, may be renamed.  In April 1981 when the hotel was purchased by Inter-Continental Hotels Corporation, the name was changed to the Hotel St. Anthony Inter-Continental.  According to a company representative, the Hotel is due to be renamed the Hotel Inter-Continental San Antonio – removing St. Anthony completely.

1987
Selena y Los Dinos play a concert in Market Square.

June 27 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The second contingent of American troops arrived and disembarked this morning at an unnamed port in France. The troops landed amid the frantic cheers of the people who had gathered for hours before in anticipation of duplicating yesterday’s surprise. Enthusiasm rose to fever pitch when it was learned that the transports and convoys had successfully passed the submarine
zone. The port was speedily beflagged in honor of the occasion. Major General Pershing, the American commander, is expected tomorrow.

1963
San Antonio moved again toward complete desegregation today after 173 restaurants, 23 motels and 9 hotels quietly opened their doors to African-Americans.

1985
The Majestic Theater features a concert with Johnny Winter, his brother, Edgar, and Gregg Allman.

June 26 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1917
On this day in 1917, the first 14,000 U.S. infantry troops land in France at the port of Saint Nazaire. The landing site had been kept secret because of the menace of German submarines, but by the time the Americans had lined up to take their first salute on French soil, an enthusiastic crowd had gathered to welcome them. However, the “Doughboys,” as the British referred to the green American troops, were untrained, ill-equipped, and far from ready for the difficulties of fighting along the Western Front.

1917
Thirty-three veterans of the Spanish-American war join together to form Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 76, the first in the State of Texas (right).  Congratulations on your centennial!

1999
The Spurs win their first NBA Championship in five games over the New York Knicks.

June 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Katherine Stinson, the San Antonio aviatrix, completed her Red Cross flight from Buffalo to Washington D.C. when she arrived late this afternoon. Miss Stinson was received by a large crowd of Red Cross officials who escorted her to the office of Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo, to whom she presented the first check from Buffalo for the Red Cross.

1971
The Doobie Brothers make their debut in San Antonio at Joe Freeman Coliseum with Mother Earth and Giant Smiling Dog.

1997
The Spurs select Tim Duncan, a 6′ 11″ forward from Wake Forest University, with the #1 pick in the NBA Draft.

June 24 in San Antonio history…

1895
St. Louis College graduates its first class – a graduating class of two. [St. Mary’s downtown college merged with St. Louis college in 1921.]

1917 – World War I
Thomas A. Carr, general superintendent, and J. G. Woods, assistant superintendent for the Stone-Webster Company of Boston, reached San Antonio last night to begin actual construction
at Camp Wilson on the army cantonment which is to house the 40.000 troops to be brought here September I for training.

1954
Three of the six youths charged with burning the city’s 80-foot Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza last New year were fined $25 and costs by Judge McCollum Burnett.

June 23 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The new roof garden on the Elks building on Avenue E will be opened to members and their guests for the first time tonight at 8:30 o’clock. Music, dancing and cabaret features
are on the program. The committee which is in charge of the entertainment consists of Al C. Jonas, chairman; Peter Hoefgen and I. A. Victor.

1938
The iron bridge at the swimming pool in Brackenridge Park, a familiar sight to thousands of park visitors in the past 20 or more years, is being torn down. A modern concrete and steel structure will replace it.

2011
Jerry Seinfeld brings his observational comedy to the Majestic Theater.

June 22 in San Antonio history…

1876
Former President of Mexico Juan Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna dies of old age in Mexico City.

1917 – World War I
Eight companies of the men in training at Camp Funston [now Camp Stanley] will receive pay for their first month’s work Monday and the remaining companies will be paid Wednesday. The first payment w ill be $100 per man with mileage for those who came to the camp from other cities. The camp has a strength of about 2,700 men and this will mean the paying out of almost $300,000 in the two days set for payment. The work will be done by officers in tho finance department of the quartermaster’s department.

1925
A new state law was passed, changing the name of the Southwest Insane Asylum to San Antonio State Hospital.

June 21 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Preliminary work on the building of cantonments for the 40,000 men to be housed at Camp Wilson after September will be started within a week and before another week elapses probably 5,000 mechanics and laborers will be hard at work on construction.

1941
Jimmy Johnson’s Playland comes to San Antonio and holds its grand opening in its first location at 223 N. St. Mary’s Street.

2006
The Police Department replaces their traditional royal and French blue uniforms  with dark navy blue.

June 19 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Subscriptions for the purchase of the ancient governor’s palace, a relic of the royal government of Spain, which stands on Military Plaza and which is in danger of being torn down, are beginning to be received by the committee working for its preservation, Miss Adina De Zavala, chairman. A regular plan of campaign has not been decided upon, but a meeting of the executive and advisory
committees will be held at some time next week, the time and place to be announced later. This building is one of the oldest structures in San Antonio and was erected by the Spanish government
as the administrative palace when Texas was a province of Spain. In spite of disfiguring signs and years of neglect and abuse, the building has a commanding appearance and the ancient seal of Spain still remains over the door.

1954
After six Negro boys go swimming in Woodlawn Pool, the San Antonio City Council votes to ban people of color from city swimming pools, making law of a de facto segregation that had existed for 90-plus years.  To add insult to such a despicable action, the law takes effect on “Juneteenth,” the 89th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Texas.  The law would be repealed two years later, on March 16, 1956.

1957
Bill Doggett and his combo, featuring San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, play Woodlake Country Club.

June 17 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Camp Kelly, the aviation field south of San Antonio, is to be enlarged to a reservation of nearly 2,500 acres and between 20,000 and 30,000 men of the aviation section are to be stationed there, according to J. H. Kirkpatrick and C. B. Fowler who returned Saturday night from a conference with War
Department officials in Washington.

1950ALAMO_HEIGHTS_Seal
The official city seal of Alamo Heights went on public display today (right).  The seal was adopted after a city-sponsored contest last fall. The winner was Charles Chambers, a student at the Littlehouse School of Art.

1976
The San Antonio Spurs become members of the National Basketball Association.