Blog Archives

May 21 in San Antonio history…

1918
The pasteurization of all milk sold in San Antonio is to be required under new regulations to be issued by the U.S. Public Health Service.  The cost to dairies of installing the necessary equipment will be considerable.

1958
Chuck Jefferson, Woodridge School third grader, was homeward bound with $32,000 he won on the “$64,000 Question” TV show.  “I wanted to go on (for $64,000), but my parents decided I should quit.  It’s too big of a risk.  Sometimes I think parents are too nervous.”

1968
Channel 5 broadcasts the CBS News program “Hunger in America,” filmed in San Antonio, illustrating the problem of poverty and lack of food in American households.

 

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May 2 in San Antonio history…

1940
When Homer Brooks, state secretary for the Communist Party and husband of Emma Tenayuca, attempted to speak at a party rally in Haymarket Plaza, he was drowned out by the crowd singing The Eyes of Texas.

1958
Alamo Heights police were holding three ex-convicts Friday who were flushed as they rolled a 500-pound safe along a Broadway sidewalk. Heights Police Sgt. Eddie Brendler arrested the three at 1 a.m. after boxing them up on a dead end street.

1987
B. W. Stevenson plays the Leon Springs Cafe.

April 28 in San Antonio history…

1909
Boerne Mayor J. Willke fines an individual $5 for exceeding the speed limit in the City of Boerne. Apparently, the speed limit on Main Street at that time was 15 miles per hour.

1935
A carnival ride in Milam Square collapses, injuring eight people.

1958San Antonio Express, 29 April 1953
Two tornadoes (later rated F3 and F4) strike Bexar County in the area of Helotes, killing two people and injuring twenty.

 

February 17 in San Antonio history…

1950
The first San Antonio Rodeo and Livestock Exposition is kicked off – in the brand new Bexar County Coliseum (later known as the Joe & Harry Freeman Coliseum.)

1958
Airman Donald Farrell was recuperating – back from the closest thing to flight through space any man has ever tried.  He stepped out of his sealed space chamber at Randolph AFB, one week after he entered.

1984
The 70-year old exhibit hall at the Kendall County Fairgrounds in Boerne is destroyed by fire.  The cause is later determined to be arson.

February 9 in San Antonio history…

1958
Airman Donald Farrell is sealed in a cramped steel chamber at the School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph AFB, to simulate a space flight. The air pressure is half of what it is at sea level and Airman Farrell cannot stand up nor lie down. His test lasts for seven days.

1964sullivan
The Beatles make their American television debut on the Ed Sullivan Show, broadcast on KENS Channel 5 at 7:00 p.m (right).  45.3% of U.S. TV households tune in, representing 73 million people — a record for an entertainment program up to that time.

1985
Tom Wopat from TV’s “Dukes of Hazzard” performs with Michael Martin Murphey at the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo.

January 13 in San Antonio history…

1958
Prompt action by railroad employees was credited today with saving more than $1,000,000 in rolling stock as a two-alarm fire gutted the Katy roundhouse. Employees drove two locomotives and several rail cars from the sheet iron building after a steam generator exploded, hurling burning oil on the walls.

1972
The Milwaukee Brewers take over the local Texas League baseball franchise and change the name from the San Antonio Missions to the San Antonio Brewers.  They have also signed a lease with V. J. Keefe field, which the Texas Leaguers have used since Mission Stadium was abandoned.

1977
City councilman Henry Cisneros, 29, is sworn in as mayor pro-tempore.  He is the youngest mayor in the city’s history.

January 5 in San Antonio history…

1908
The poll tax is an assured fact. But one of these days the true inwardness of that amendment will be seen and the men who were for it first, last and always, will wonder by what perversity of judgement they were led to advocate a measure so unnecessary and hurtful.

1958
The “Texas Special” passenger train, providing service between San Antonio and St. Louis, is discontinued by the M-K-T Railway Company.

1990
Saxophonist Kenny G performs at Municipal Auditorium.

November 6 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
The San Antonio Board of Education issued an order at their meeting last night for janitors of all the school buildings to have the rooms thoroughly fumigated as a precautionary measure against the spread of influenza when the schools are reopened.

1958
The Witte Museum was offered and accepted a gift of $225,000 today from Mr. and Mrs. Richard Friedrich.  The money will be used to expand and landscape the present facility.

1980
City Council approves the Metropolitan Planning Organization’s plan to purchase motorized replica streetcars to replace buses on downtown El Centro shuttle routes.

August 23 in San Antonio history…

1902
J.A. Berry, foreman on the work at the Carnegie Library, celebrated arrival of his first-born son yesterday afternoon. When the quit work whistle blew, Berry assembled the workmen in the main buildings where a copious spread of beer and lunch was served.

1958scan0008
The newest and biggest addition to the San Antonio Public Library’s fleet of four bookmobiles went into service today.  The green and cream bookmobile, complete with a stork emblem indicating its new arrival, went into service at the Sunset Ridge Shopping Center.

1985
Brooke Shields appears at Dillard’s in Ingram Park Mall to promote “her new collection of Brooke Shields Jeanswear.”

July 30 in San Antonio history…

1958
County Commissioners Court changed the name of Bexar County Coliseum to Joe Freeman Coliseum.  In changing the name of the building, members of the court noted that “through his untiring efforts and unselfish and liberal donations, Joe Freeman, an outstanding citizen of San Antonio and Bexar County, is responsible for a coliseum of which all Bexar County may be proud.”

1985
Convention Center Arena features hair-metal favorites Ratt and opening act Bon Jovi.

1990
Sixty feet of the new flood-control tunnel under construction collapses, leaving a 620-ton boring machine stuck 150 feet beneath Brackenridge High School.  The collapse boosted the price of the tunnel by $10 million and left the Ohbayashi Corporation and the Army Corps of Engineers perplexed as to how to complete the boring through unstable soil.