Blog Archives

February 22 in San Antonio history…

1917
A proclamation signed by Mayor Brown, County Judge Davis and President Franz C. Groos, of the Chamber of Commerce, is as follows: “In appreciation of the distinguished services rendered this republic by that great soldier and patriot, Major General Frederick Funston, and as an expression of the high esteem and love felt for him by citizens of every rank in San Antonio, we, the undersigned, call a memorial meeting in his honor, to be held at Beethoven Hall on Saturday. February 24 at 3 p.m.  All citizens of San Antonio and members of the army are invited to participate.’’

1944
A San Antonian waited in line two hours at the Federal Building to pay his income tax but balked when a seaman attemped to fingerprint him and enlist him in the Navy. He was in the wrong line.

1946Tex Ritter at the Texas Theater, 1946.
Tex Ritter appears in a stage show at the Texas Theater (right).

 

January 2 in San Antonio history…

1944
Olivia DeHavilland, brown-haired movie star, visits patients at Brooke General Hospital.

1954
Teen-age vandals set fire to the 55-foot municipal Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza. Only the steel frame and a charred utility pole remained.

1985
Derrick Gervin, younger brother of George “Iceman” Gervin, scores 51 points for the UTSA Roadrunners as they defeat Baylor, 101-91, in the UTSA Convocation Center.

January 1 in San Antonio history…

1926
The local Carnegie Library appealed to city residents to return long delinquent books.

1941
Owen Kilday becomes Bexar County Sheriff.  He will be the longest serving sheriff of Bexar County – until 1962.

1944Ramblerspennant
The Randolph Field Ramblers, a team made up of former college athletes serving in the military, play the University of Texas to a 7-7 tie in the Cotton Bowl.  This is the only San Antonio team to ever play in the Cotton Bowl and this was the first tie in the bowl game’s history.  Only 15,000 spectators witnessed the game due to heavy rain.

September 4 in San Antonio history

1932
San Antonio switches over to the dial telephone system. Telephone exchanges change from Crockett, Travis, Mission and Woodlawn to Belmont, Cathedral, Fannin, Garfield, Kenwood, Lambert, Parkview and Pershing.

1944gi_bill344
The Serviceman’s Readjustment Act, better known as the G. I. Bill of Rights, goes into effect today.  According to M. R. Gill, supervisor for the San Antonio district of the Texas Unemployment Compensation Commission, the agency which is to administer the law, an initial claim load of 1,000 is anticipated in San Antonio.

1957
The Edsel goes on sale at Winerich Motors, 1820 Broadway.  Despite Ford Motor Company’s investment of $400 million in the new car, it was such a flop that production ceased only two years later, on Nov. 19, 1959.

August 23 in San Antonio history…

1902
J.A. Berry, foreman on the work at the Carnegie Library, celebrated arrival of his first-born son yesterday afternoon. When the quit work whistle blew, Berry assembled the workmen in the main buildings where a copious spread of beer and lunch was served.

1944halff
Plans to convert the four-story Halff building (right) at 336 E. Commerce into an African-American hotel were thwarted when nearby residents protested before the city zoning board today in City Hall.  “I am [the] manager of the Cameo Theater, which has given the Negroes a modern theater and now I think our next step is to convert this vacant building into a clean, modern hotel.  The Negroes have been pushed around and had to live in ‘dumps’ for years.  The better class Negro is just as afraid to walk through the 400 and 500 block of East Commerce as the white folks are.  We want it cleaned up.” said Pinkie Smith. (photo courtesy of UTSA digital collections)

1970
What was billed as the first Mexican-American-sponsored fund-raising event for a Republican in Texas history was held at the Gunter Hotel last night for U.S. Senate candidate George H. W. Bush.

July 18 in San Antonio history…

1939
On the anniversary of his famed flight to Ireland, Douglas “Wrong Way” Corrigan took as his bride yesterday afternoon, his childhood sweetheart, Miss Elizabeth Marvin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Marvin,  507 Terrell Rd.  The wedding was in the chapel of the First Baptist Church.

1944
Lt. Stanton D. Richart of San Antonio and three aides were credited with the capture of 85 Nazis by falsely convincing the Germans that they were surrounded.  For this action, Lt. Richart receives the Silver Star with Oak Leaf cluster.

1970
“The Great (Little) Train Robbery:” Passengers aboard Old No. 99 , Brackenridge Park’s miniature train, are robbed of their valuables by two soldiers from Ft. Sam Houston. Riders initially think it is a joke – until they see the guns are real. Both robbers are caught and sentenced to prison terms of 20 and 10 years, respectively.
As of 2016, this is the last train robbery in San Antonio.

June 4 in San Antonio history…

1836
Juan Seguin accepts the surrender of Mexican forces in San Antonio from General Martin Perfecto de Cos.

1926
The Aztec Theatre opened promising “a totally new form of entertainment.”

1944
Several San Antonio radio stations broadcast a false report, accidentally released nationwide by a press service, of an Allied invasion of Europe, setting off premature celebrations of D-Day.

January 1 in San Antonio history…

1942
The first law requiring automobiles in Bexar County to be titled and registered takes effect.

1944Ramblerspennant
The Randolph Field Ramblers, a team made up of former college athletes serving in the military, play the University of Texas to a 7-7 tie in the Cotton Bowl.  This is the only San Antonio team to ever play in the Cotton Bowl and this was the first tie in the bowl game’s history.  Only 15,000 spectators witnessed the game due to heavy rain.

1985
Due to a new state law in effect today, San Antonio drivers of passenger cars or light trucks carrying a child not secured in a car seat will be subject to a fine of between $25 and $50.

December 27 in San Antonio history…

1944
The Texas Aggies of the Southwest Conference are in San Antonio tonight to play the Cadet Center Warhawks in a basketball game at the Cadet Center gym.  Tomorrow night at Municipal Auditorium, the Aggies play the Camp Normoyle Raiders.  That game will be preceded by a game between the undefeated Lanier Voks and the San Antonio Tech Buffaloes. Normoyle outscored the Aggies in a recent game in College Station.

1947
Despite being undersized and trailing at halftime, Class 2A Brackenridge High School defeats Dallas Highland Park, 22-13, in front of 24,795 fans at Alamo Stadium to win the city’s first UIL state football championship.

1985
Radio stations KONO and KITY are sold by Mission Broadcasting Co. to Dallas-based Duffy Broadcasting Co., ending 60 years of continuous ownership by the Roth family.

September 6 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
American war correspondent James Archibald is searched in Great Britain  and is found to be carrying a letter from Constantin Theodor Dumba, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to the United States to the Minister for Foreign Affairs in Vienna. The letter describes a plan to delay the production of American munitions by a strike action. He is charged with performing an “unneutral service” and later released.

1894
San Antonio Female College opens its doors.  In 1916 the college was recognized by the University of Texas as a junior college. The name was changed to Westmoorland College in 1918 and to the University of San Antonio in 1937. In 1942 the institution passed out of Methodist control, and the University of San Antonio was merged with Trinity University.

1944
Ninety-three San Antonio liquor stores signed an agreement to close shop immediately when the Nazis surrender.

1983
The United States Football League holds their expansion draft for the San Antonio Gunslingers along with Jacksonville Bulls, Pittsburgh Maulers, Houston Gamblers, Oklahoma Outlaws and Memphis Showboats.