Blog Archives

May 14 in San Antonio history…

1926veramendi
After being in storage for many years, the doors to the Veramendi Palace (right) were donated to the Alamo Museum today by John James.  Mr. James, along with the late Capt. F. F. Collins, has owned the doors since the old palace was razed about 15 years ago. The doors are made of hand-carved cedar and are so heavy that it takes six men to lift one.

1940
The newspapers advertise nylon hosiery, offered for sale for the first time at 9 a.m. the following morning at many San Antonio department stores, including Joske’s.

1993
An early grand opening is held at the Alamodome by invitation only.

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May 13 in San Antonio history…

1912
Setting a precedent for future celebrations of the same nature, more than 200 San Antonians gathered Sunday afternoon at the YMCA to celebrate the day that had been set aside in honor of “the best mother in the world, your mother.”

1928
A new “aerial welcome mat” goes up at Winburn Field (right).  The sign was constructed by William Steinhardt of Mission Airplane Services, distributors of the Ryan monoplane and Monocoupe.  Stinson Field was renamed for San Antonio Light reporter Bill Winburn, who was killed in a plane crash, in October 1927.

1940
Complete to the last blade of grass,  San Antonio’s newly constructed open-air theater on the San Antonio River behind the public library, has been pronounced ready for service today by officials of the river beautification project.

 

 

May 2 in San Antonio history…

1940
When Homer Brooks, state secretary for the Communist Party and husband of Emma Tenayuca, attempted to speak at a party rally in Haymarket Plaza, he was drowned out by the crowd singing The Eyes of Texas.

1958
Alamo Heights police were holding three ex-convicts Friday who were flushed as they rolled a 500-pound safe along a Broadway sidewalk. Heights Police Sgt. Eddie Brendler arrested the three at 1 a.m. after boxing them up on a dead end street.

1987
B. W. Stevenson plays the Leon Springs Cafe.

April 20 in San Antonio history…

1891
President Benjamin Harrison visits San Antonio during the inaugural Fiesta San Jacinto. He is the first President to visit the Alamo City.

1940
Lone Star Beer is first placed on the market (right).

1980
The Whispers, Shalamar, Lakeside and Dynasty perform at Joe and Harry Freeman Coliseum.

April 12 in San Antonio history…

1793
Mission San Antonio de Valero (today known as “The Alamo”) is secularized by decree.

1940
The mayor, desiring further to streamline the city government, has entered into negotiations for the purchase of the Smith-Young Tower.  The Don is of the opinion that the entire city government would be centered there if the deal goes through and would include the fire department and police headquarters.

1946
Duke Ellington and his orchestra play a concert in Sunken Garden Theater. (right)

January 17 in San Antonio history…

1932
The new Central Catholic High School is dedicated.

1940
Referring to tuberculosis as “San Antonio’s Public Enemy Number One”, Mayor Maury Maverick announced today that the city will join the intensive campaign to eradicate the much dreaded disease.

1946
An Army R6A helicopter lands at Brooks Field after flying in from Alexandria, LA in an experimental flight. The ship is one of a few used by the Air Force primarily for rescue work. (Photo courtesy of USAF Museum)

December 28 in San Antonio history…

1940
Four of the “Our Gang” kids, Alfalfa (Carl Switzer), Waldo (Darwood Kayne), Muggsy (Shirley Coates) and Darleena (Anita Gordon) arrive in San Antonio for a four-day appearance at the Texas Theater.

1977
Nationally syndicated columnist Heloise (real name Katherine Eloise Bowles) passes away at the downtown Baptist Hospital at age 58.  Her daughter, Ponce Heloise Cruse will take over her “Hints from Heloise” column.

1983
Heart plays Municipal Auditorium with opening act, The Romantics.

December 26 in San Antonio history…

1927
Today, the day after Christmas, has been set aside as a holiday in San Antonio – a day to be devoted to the making of New Year’s resolutions.  City offices, all banks and most businesses will be closed.

1929
Police report that 100 cases of tomatoes belonging to the Morris Novich Company were stolen from a boxcar near the company’s headquarters near 503 Medina Street.

1940
A messenger for the W. T. Grant store was held up by a lone gunman in the heart of the downtown district this morning and robbed of $3500 in Christmas receipts he was taking to the Frost National Bank. Tlie robbery occurred on the St. Mary’s street bridge across from the Public Service building.

November 11 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I ends
The State Department makes the announcement at 2:45 a.m. that the armistice is signed and “The War to End All Wars” is ended.

1940
The Alamo Cenotaph is dedicated with festivities and an Armistice Day parade.

1984
Municipal Auditorium, dedicated in 1926 to San Antonio servicemen killed in World War I, is rededicated to include those killed in World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars.  Gutted by fire in 1979, the auditorium is scheduled to be reopened next year after almost $13 million in renovations.

October 27 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Around the motto “For the Boys Over There,” a campaign for United War Work will be waged over the nation for one week, beginning November 11.  In the San Antonio district, there are two counties, Bexar and Kendall.  A quota for Bexar County of $175,000 was suggested but the city and county will not stop until the sum of $200,000 is reached.

1940
H.G. Wells, in San Antonio to attend the 65th annual United States Brewers Convention, meets Orson Welles for the first time at the Plaza Hotel.  Welles stopped in the city briefly, en route to Tucson to scout a movie location.  He admitted to being apprehensive at meeting the “War of the Worlds” author.

1995
Barnes and Noble opens their first two San Antonio stores at Fiesta Trails shopping center on DeZavala and the Ingram Festival shopping center on Loop 410 near Ingram Mall.