Blog Archives

June 14 in San Antonio history…

1952
San Antonio’s garbage workers went back to their jobs this morning after a sit-down strike that lasted two hours and 27 minutes but it appears that the controversy is still red hot. Sixty-one drivers and 122 pickup men refused to go out on their routes this morning because they want Ed Marceau, superintendent, who had handed in his letter of resignation, to come back, and they want changes in the truck maintenance setup.

1956>May 11 in San Antonio history...
City philatelists flocked to the post offices today to be first in line when the new Alamo postage stamps (right) went on sale at 7 a.m.

1992
Due to a very rainy winter and spring, the water in the J-17 Edwards Aquifer monitoring well reaches an all-time high of 703.3 feet.

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May 13 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
City National Bank offers loans to purchase war bonds for those unable to purchase with cash.  The loan is to be paid off in 12 monthly installments at 3.5% interest.

1952
More than 500 Trinity University stalwarts packed up everything but their Bunsen burners today and headed from the old campus at 3115 W. Ashby Place, where the university had been located since 1912, eastward to the new campus on Stadium Drive.

2004 
In Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals, Derek Fisher of the Lakers gets the ball with 0.4 seconds on the clock and nails a jump shot to defeat the Spurs, 74-73. The Spurs had rallied from 16 points down with 3:59 left in the third quarter. They had seemingly escaped with an improbable victory after Tim Duncan sank an 18-footer with 0.4 seconds left.

April 1 in San Antonio history…

1945
The Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro League, battle Charlie “Cholly” Engle’s All-Star team in a 14-inning thriller that ends up being called as a 4-4 tie.  The Monarchs had to catch a bus for Houston.  The Monarchs have a new shortstop by the name of Jackie Robinson who, unfortunately, has a double error in the seventh inning, allowing the All-Stars to score the tying run.

1947air-conditioned buses
The San Antonio Transit Company begins putting into service their new fleet of 50 air-conditioned city buses.  The Alamo city is the first city in the world to have air-conditioned metropolitan buses.  They even offer free rides on a downtown loop between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

1952
The name of the producers of Pearl beer has been officially changed from San Antonio Brewing Association to Pearl Brewing Company, according to Datus E. Proper, vice-president and general manager.

1996
Longtime San Antonio grocers Centeno Supermarkets files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

March 21 in San Antonio history…

1934
Actor Al Freeman, Jr. is born in San Antonio.  In 1979, he became the first African-American actor to win a daytime Emmy award for his portrayal of Police Captain Ed Hall in the soap opera “One Life to Live.”  He also appeared in movies such as “Lillies of the Field” with Sidney Poitier and Spike Lee’s “Malcolm X.”

1952
San Antonio will be attached to the family of cities served by network television July 1, it was revealed today.  The announcement came from the long-line department of American Telephone and Telegraph Co.

1968cpm_map_68
Central Park Mall holds its grand opening.

September 29 in San Antonio history…

1952vance_house
Workmen begin razing the Vance House at Nueva and Dwyer, despite protests from the Conservation Society.  The Vance House, a Greek Revival mansion,  was built between 1857 and 1859 by James Vance, a local banker. Col. Robert E. Lee, walking under the grape arbors on its grounds, was said to have decided to resign a colonelcy in the United States (Union) Army and join the Confederacy, though he was fundamentally opposed to rebellion.  Having made up his mind, he announced at a dinner in the Vance House’s great dining room:  “If Virginia secedes, I shall stand with her.”  Virginia seceded and Lee became the Commander of the Confederate armies.  The Federal Reserve Bank currently stands on the site. (photo from the UTSA Archives)

1955
San Antonio’s largest building, the Transit Tower, was sold to the Citizen’s Republic Insurance Company for $1 million.

1957
Rubber hoses are back at the county jail and prisoners will get “belted” by them if they complain about the food, so says Sheriff Owen Kilday who says “civil rights or no—these whips are back to stay.”

September 5 in San Antonio history…

1949
The NFL’s New York Bulldogs, with former UT quarterback Bobby Layne, and Los Angeles Rams play in Alamo Stadium in front of 18,452 fans.  The Rams win, 21-14.

1952buddyy
The NFL’s newest franchise – the Dallas Texans, featuring swift running back Buddy Young (right), play the Washington Redskins in Alamo Stadium.  The Texans, a renamed and a relocated franchise formerly known as the New York Yanks, defeat Sammy Baugh’s Redskins, 27-14, but fold at the end of the season.  For 1953, the NFL relocates the team to Baltimore and they are renamed the Colts.

2000
The mercury reaches 111 degrees – the hottest day in San Antonio history.

May 17 in San Antonio history…

1906
The skating rink at Electric Park was opened to the public and the sport instantly was established as a favorite among young people.

1927
A distillery on wheels was discovered by prohibition agents last night when they stopped a truck with a still operation on it and five gallons of whisky.  The owner said he did the bootlegging on the side to support his children.

1952
The San Antonio Zoo receives a young African male lion from a private owner who was moving overseas and could not bring the cat with him.  The young lion was transported to San Antonio from Austin in an automobile, whose upholstery suffered considerably.

May 13 in San Antonio history…

1952
More than 500 Trinity University stalwarts packed up everything but their Bunsen burners today and headed from the old campus at 3115 W. Ashby Place, where the university had been located since 1912, eastward to the new campus on Stadium Drive.

1954
Fats Domino and his orchestra entertain at Woodlake Country Club.

2004 fisher
In Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals, Derek Fisher of the Lakers gets the ball with 0.4 seconds on the clock and nails a jump shot to defeat the Spurs, 74-73. The Spurs had rallied from 16 points down with 3:59 left in the third quarter. They had seemingly escaped with an improbable victory after Tim Duncan sank an 18-footer with 0.4 seconds left.

November 28 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
Tho capture of a large section of allied trenches near Ari Burnu on the Gallipoli peninsula as a result of a surprise attack by the Turks is reported from Constantinople.

1730
Sixteen immigrant families from the Canary Islands arrive in San Antonio.

1952
A change of location for the ground-breaking program for the Congregation Agudas Achim new synagogue and school building was announced Saturday by Rabbi Sidney Guthman.

September 29 in San Antonio history…

1952vance_house
Workmen begin razing the Vance House at Nueva and Dwyer, despite protests from the Conservation Society.  The Vance House, a Greek Revival mansion,  was built between 1857 and 1859 by James Vance, a local banker. Col. Robert E. Lee, walking under the grape arbors on its grounds, was said to have decided to resign a colonelcy in the United States (Union) Army and join the Confederacy, though he was fundamentally opposed to rebellion.  Having made up his mind, he announced at a dinner in the Vance House’s great dining room:  “If Virginia secedes, I shall stand with her.”  Virginia seceded and Lee became the Commander of the Confederate armies.  The Federal Reserve Bank currently stands on the site. (photo from the UTSA Archives)

1955
San Antonio’s largest building, the Transit Tower, was sold to the Citizen’s Republic Insurance Company for $1 million.

1967
President Lyndon B. Johnson speaks in the La Villita Assembly Hall for the state dinner of the National Legislative Conference.