Blog Archives

April 26 in San Antonio history…

1909>November 20 in San Antonio history...
The new eight-story hotel (right) at Houston & St. Mary’s is christened “The Gunter” after Jot Gunter. It is planned to open in November.

1918 – World War I
Cadet Frank Countryman of Kelly Field made a speech in Honey Grove, Texas last night.  Near the end of the speech a little girl broke away from her parents, rushed up to Countryman, threw her arms around him and said she wanted to kiss him.  Countryman took up the child and kissed her and said, “I am fighting for a little girl just like this, and so are we all.”  People in the audience, with tears streaming down their faces, pledged $156,000 to the Liberty Loan.

1933
Carol Creighton Burnett is born in San Antonio, near W. Commerce and Rosillo streets to Ina Louise and Joseph Thomas Burnett.

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February 12 in San Antonio history…

1918 – World War I
Miss Katherine Stinson, world famous San Antonio girl aviator, has returned to the city from the Pacific coast, where she has been flying in exhibitions during the winter.  Miss Stinson will remain in San Antonio indefinitely, taking up the work as instructor at the Stinson flying school south of the city.

1933
San Antonio begins transition from streetcars to buses, discontinuing the Highland Park, Denver Heights, Beacon Hill, Tobin Hill and South Presa traction lines.

1982
Visitors to the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo are treated to a number of improvements inside and outside of the Coliseum, including the brand new Harry Freeman Entertainment Center to the west of the main building.  Concession stands have been spruced up or completely remade.  The Family Center has become the Branding Iron Cafeteria and Club and the Ranch House Restaurant has been renovated completely.

September 14 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Army aviators at Kelly Field will pay unique tribute to Lieutenant Floyd House of Lake Charles, La., who died last night as the result of injuries received in a motorcycle accident on the Frio City Road at 8 o’clock. Either as the funeral is held from the base hospital or as the train bearing the body  leaves the depot twenty aeroplanes will pass over in parade formation and the aviators will drop floral tributes.

1933
San Antonians were looking forward to midnight to sample their first legal beer in 15 years.

1976
A “hammer-like” gust of wind topples a wall of the partially-demolished Household Furniture Building at St. Mary’s and Commerce Streets, injuring six people, scattering debris over Commerce Street and shattering the doors of the Alamo Bank Building nearby.

June 8 in San Antonio history…

1929
Construction of the Sunken Garden Theater is begun.

1933
The Reptile Garden opens at the Witte Museum.  (It would close in 1975.)

1955
Fess Parker and Buddy Ebsen, stars of the new Disney movie “Davy Crockett: King of the Wild Frontier” are in San Antonio for the movie’s world premiere at the Majestic Theater tonight.

May 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Menger Hotel offers “Old Glory Night,” a night dedicated to the military, with dinner and music.

1923
The Travis Building and Robert E. Lee Hotel are opened.

1933
San Antonio resident, Jimmie Rodgers, “The Singing Brakeman” dies at the Taft Hotel in New York.

April 26 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The taking of the first American prisoner of war was reported to the American embassy today through the American consul at Glasgow.

1933burnett
Carol Creighton Burnett is born in San Antonio, near W. Commerce and Rosillo streets.

1956
Segregation was ended on San Antonio buses in line with a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

February 14 in San Antonio history…

1896
Lovers of that delicious dish, chili con carne, may be slightly nauseated to learn that vendors of this delicacy on the plaza get their water from the ditch that runs in front of San Fernando Cathedral.

1916
Second lieutenant and future President Dwight D. Eisenhower, stationed at Ft. Sam Houston,  proposes to Mamie Doud.  She accepts.

1933
Thieves who possibly came in the guise of worshipers took a crucifix two and one-half feet high, several glasses, and altar candles from the Shrine of the Little Flower, located at Kentucky Avenue and Zarzamora Street, it was reported today.

January 22 in San Antonio history…

1925
The State Legislature prepared to end Bexar County’s “five-minute divorce” system.

1933
Only in chasing criminals or in answering emergency calls will radio patrol cars be allowed to exceed a speed limit of 25 miles per hour in the future, according to an order issued today by Chief of Police Owen Kilday.

1947
“It’s A Joke, Son!,” the new film featuring Kenny Delmar as Senator Claghorn (the inspiration for the animated character Foghorn Leghorn) premieres at the Aztec Theater with in-person appearances from cast members Una Merkel and June Lockhart (later a star on TV shows “Lassie” and “Lost in Space.”)

1973
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson is transported by airplane from his Johnson City ranch to Brooke Army General Hospital where he is pronounced dead on arrival.

September 15 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1916British_Mark_I_Tank
The Battle of Flers–Courcelette, the third and final general offensive mounted by the British Army in the Battle of the Somme, begins.  This battle is notable for the debut of the new British Heavy Machine Gun Branch’s “secret weapon” – the tank.  (British Mark I shown at right)

1875
The first of two great hurricanes to hit the Texas port city of  Indianola come ashore.  When the damage is done, only eight buildings are left undamaged and fatalities are estimated at 150 to 300 dead.

1933
At 12:01 a.m., Prohibition ends.  Anheuser-Busch sends their brewery wagon and Clydesdale horse team to distribute the beer in downtown San Antonio.

1968
Two monorail trains collide at Hemisfair, killing one person and injuring 47.

May 26 in San Antonio history…

1869
The velocipede (bicycle) makes its first appearance in San Antonio.

1898
The roof of the steeple at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church has been finished.  It is the highest and finest spire in the city.  A little work about the base of the slate roof yet remains to be done.

1933
San Antonio resident, Jimmie Rodgers, “The Singing Brakeman” dies at the Taft Hotel in New York.