Blog Archives

December 21 in San Antonio history…

1868
The first Fair of the Agricultural and Industrial Association of Western Texas is opened.

1917 – World War I
Every once in a while a man comes forward and says frankly why he did a thing without trying to make an excuse and this happened at Kelly Field the other day.  There are no speedometers on the trucks and the favorite excuse is that the driver did not know how fast he was going.  An accused driver the other day said, “I’ll tell you the truth, sir.  I just like to ride fast.  That’s the reason I was doing it.”

1929
San Antonio receives nearly three inches of snow, a fraction of the snowfall in Central Texas.  The town of Clifton receives 24 inches, still the greatest amount of snow ever to fall in Texas.

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October 29 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Treasury Secretary McAdoo has issued a statement asserting his belief that women are qualified for the ballot and expressing the hope that they would get it in New York.  Mr. McAdoo says:  “The time has come when suffrage should be given to the women of America.  The women of the United States have in every way, especially since this war has broken out, shown themselves qualified for the right of suffrage.”

1929express
The Express-News dedicates its new building at the corner of Avenue E and 3rd streets (right).  The day is inauspicious due to the second day of panic selling on Wall Street.  The stock market crash reaches its crescendo today and will come to be known as “Black Tuesday.”

1949
All lights in Bexar County were out for the first time in history last night due to a public service power failure. The blackout extended beyond the county limits as far as Comfort, Boerne, Kerrville, New Braunfels, and Floresville.

 

October 28 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The Mayor issues a proclamation “To Loyal San Antonio Women:”

Whereas, the President of the United States, has, through National Food Administrator Hoover, called on every loyal American woman to save food, and
Whereas, thousands of woman and children in Europe are suffering from hunger and unless we save our staple foods and eat as far as possible the more perishable foods our boys in France may go hungry and our own people be short of food.
Now, therefore, believing that it is our patriotic duty to help not only our country at this crisis but to aid suffering humanity, I, Sam C. Bell, mayor of San Antonio, do hereby urge every woman in this city to sign the Food Pledge Card, and to put in the front window the Food Membership Card, and above all to follow the instructions of the Home Card and save food.              SAM C. BELL

1929
The Express-News dedicates its new building at the corner of Alamo and 3rd streets.

1975
The rock band Rush plays their first concert in San Antonio at Randy’s Rodeo. Heyoka opens the show.

October 18 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Failure to familiarize themselves with the terms of the draft law applying to army desertions is leading peace officers to make many arrests where the men arrested are not really deserters, according to the announcement today at Camp Travis.  A number of men have been brought to the camp by peace officers, who were later released, as they were not deserters. Maj. E. C. McNeil, division inspector said yesterday that that the local boards in many instances were not familiar with the law and in some instances were responsible for these arrests.

1929
Construction of the first buildings for the new “West Point of the Air” at Randolph Field will begin within the next 10 days.

1969
Janis Joplin and the Kozmic Blues Band play a concert at Hemisfair Arena (right).

October 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A tract of land directly south of San Antonio comprising approximately 1600 acres is being assembled by a committee from the Chamber of Commerce for submission to the War Department as a site for a new aviation field.  This new tract is about six miles away from Kelly Field and directly south of the city.  It is bounded on the north by the Upson Road, on the east by the Southton Road and on the west by the Goliad Road.

1926
The Witte Museum is opened to the public.

1929
“It’s the greatest thing since sliced bread!”
Richter’s Bakery begins advertising sliced Butter Krust bread along with the traditionally unsliced loaves.

August 29 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Making the charge that San Antonio citizens showed neglect in not giving the city’s guardsmen a proper farewell when they left for the training camp in Fort Worth, a member of the First Texas Infantry has written a letter to a friend in San Antonio in which he intimates that if a similar number of soldiers had left the city to join the Kaiser’s army there would have been a larger crowd of applauding friends at the station to see them off.

1929
Studer Camera Company is established by Ben Studer in a small building on the front of a lot at 2118 Main Avenue.

1955
The first black students in San Antonio’s history to be accepted for classes in public high schools with white students have been enrolled in Edgewood High School.

June 8 in San Antonio history…

1929
Construction of the Sunken Garden Theater is begun.

1933
The Reptile Garden opens at the Witte Museum.  (It would close in 1975.)

1955
Fess Parker and Buddy Ebsen, stars of the new Disney movie “Davy Crockett: King of the Wild Frontier” are in San Antonio for the movie’s world premiere at the Majestic Theater tonight.

June 1 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Federal Marshal John H. Rogers this morning began checking over the names of German alien enemies who have permits to go within a half-mile of army properties and comparing them with a list of such aliens known to reside or work within the prohibited area. The an nouncement was made that those who have not applied for permits will be arrested at once if located within the forbidden territory. The President’s proclamation, which bars German alien enemies from going or remaining within a half mile of the army post, the arsenal and the aviation camp, went into effect this morning. In all, more than 200 German alien enemies have obtained the requisite permission to stay or go within the half mile area.

1929
The Smith-Young Tower [now Tower Life Building] is completed at a cost of $3 million.  It will be the tallest building west of the Mississippi River until the late 1950s.  The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.

1958
Northeast High School is officially renamed Douglas MacArthur High School.

April 16 in San Antonio history…

1917
King Antonio III, attended by members of his court, arrives by train at the International & Great Northern Railroad depot, is given a 21-gun salute and is escorted to the St. Anthony Hotel in a grand procession of decorated automobiles, where he is presented with the keys to the city.

1929
Smoking by uniformed policemen while on duty is forbidden in a general order issued by Police Chief Owen Kilday today.  Exempted from the order are men on dogwatch from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.

1968
La Posada Motor Hotel (now La Mansion del Rio) was “eternally opened” today at a 2:30 p.m. ceremony.  Father Louis Blume, S.M., president of St. Mary’s University, Rabbi David Jacobson and Espiscopal Bishop R. Earl Dicus joined in the ecumenical blessing of the new hotel.  Mayor W. W. McAllister then tossed a key off the balcony and into the San Antonio River to officially open the hotel.  “The doors of La Posada will never again be locked,” said Tom Herring, president of the hotel company.  The building previously housed the St. Mary’s School of Law before its conversion into a hotel.

February 23 in San Antonio history…

1720
Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo is founded by Father Margil de Jesus, who names it in honor of San Jose, San Miguel and Governor Aguayo (Jose de Azlor y Virto de Vera, the Marquis de Aguayo, appointed Governor of Texas and Coahuila in 1719).  Olivares protests its closeness to Mission San Antonio.  Captain Alazar lays out the 10 leagues distance between the missions required by the Laws of the Indies in order to give it the protection of the presidio.

1929post_office
Fire, apparently started by defective wiring, threatened mail and federal records and did $30,000 damage to San Antonio’s historic federal building in Alamo Plaza (right).

1968
The Daughters of the Republic of Texas formally open the Long Barracks at the Alamo.