Blog Archives

July 17 in San Antonio history…

1856
San Antonio’s city limits are set as one square league with the dome of San Fernando Cathedral as center (right), divided into four wards.

1929
Mayor C. M. Chambers announced today that the two branch public libraries, to be constructed out of the 1928 bond issue at a cost of $25,000 each, will be built in Roosevelt and San Pedro parks.  Work on the buildings will begin as soon as plans and specifications now being drawn by architects can be approved by the library board.

1945
Clara Driscoll, known as the “Savior of the Alamo” dies in her penthouse at the Driscoll Hotel in Corpus Christi. She is the fourth person to lie in state at the Alamo and is buried at Alamo Masonic Cemetery.

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June 28 in San Antonio history…

1912
Within a few days it will be possible to tell the time by looking at the clock in the tower of the city hall. The machinery has been repaired and work was begun today painting the four faces.

1929
Architect Robert H. H. Hugman meets with with Mayor Chambers, two city commissioners, a group of property owners, and other civic leaders and began his presentation on river beautification entitled “Shops of Aragon and Romula.”  The plan, which would become the San Antonio Riverwalk, was based on old world cities in Spain and France.

1946
The Trail Drive-in theater at Military and Roosevelt opens.

 

June 14 in San Antonio history…

1929
The “Greater” Majestic Theater opens its doors offering “The Singing Brakeman” Jimmie Rodgers on stage along with the Movietone Follies of 1929.

1939
Clinton G. Brown, former mayor, has urged Commissioner Henry Hein to see that proper care is taken of 12 Texas centennial pecan trees planted in 1936 in various downtown parks and the courthouse on Texas Independence Day.

1956>May 11 in San Antonio history...
City philatelists flocked to the post offices today to be first in line when the new Alamo postage stamps (right) went on sale at 7 a.m.

June 8 in San Antonio history…

1897
West Texas Military Academy (now Texas Military Institute) graduates the class of 1897 – including future General Douglas MacArthur.  Gen. MacArthur was one of the original 49 cadets from the first class at W.T.M.A. in 1893-94.

1929
Construction of the Sunken Garden Theater is begun.

1946
The state department of health called for the chlorination of all water supplies in San Antonio, in spite of opposition to the measure from the city water board which fears it will cause “hysteria.”

June 1 in San Antonio history…

1928
Black voters will be barred from the polls at the July primary in Bexar County, it was indicated today as plans neared completion for a city-county machine caucus tomorrow to name candidates on the county Democratic ticket.

1929
The Smith-Young Tower [now Tower Life Building] is completed at a cost of $3 million.  It will be the tallest building west of the Mississippi River until the late 1950s.  The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.

1936
The San Antonio Library begins bookmobile service (right) to rural locations in Bexar County.

 

February 23 in San Antonio history…

1861
The Referendum on Secession takes place and Texans head to the polls to vote.  Bexar County votes to secede, 827 to 709.  Nearby counties of Blanco, Gillespie, Medina and Uvalde do not.

1867
The Beethoven Männerchor (German singing society) is organized.

1902
E. Raba, the photographer in S. Alamo, badly burned his hand in the premature explosion of powder while making a flashlight picture.

1929post_office
Fire, apparently started by defective wiring, threatened mail and federal records and did $30,000 damage to San Antonio’s historic federal building in Alamo Plaza (right).

January 20 in San Antonio history…

1881January 20 in San Antonio history...
The first issue of the San Antonio Light rolls off the printing presses. It remains in circulation until January 28, 1993.

1929
The San Antonio Light reports that in the eleven months since the Milam Cafeteria opened (February 1, 1928), over half a million people have eaten in the restaurant – nearly twice the population of San Antonio.

1961
Jackie Gleason hosts his new show “You’re in the Picture” at 8:30 p.m on KENS Channel 5.  The show is cancelled after only one episode.  For the next week’s episode, he spends the entire 30 minutes apologizing for how bad the show was.

December 26 in San Antonio history…

1927
Today, the day after Christmas, has been set aside as a holiday in San Antonio – a day to be devoted to the making of New Year’s resolutions.  City offices, all banks and most businesses will be closed.

1929
Police report that 100 cases of tomatoes belonging to the Morris Novich Company were stolen from a boxcar near the company’s headquarters near 503 Medina Street.

1940
A messenger for the W. T. Grant store was held up by a lone gunman in the heart of the downtown district this morning and robbed of $3500 in Christmas receipts he was taking to the Frost National Bank. Tlie robbery occurred on the St. Mary’s street bridge across from the Public Service building.

December 25 in San Antonio history…

1929
Santa visits St. Peter and St. Joseph’s orphanage at 1 a.m.  Children are allowed to catch a glimpse of the old elf and served an early breakfast after the festivities.

1955
It’s not a white Christmas in San Antonio – far from it!  The mercury rises to a record high of 90 degrees in the Alamo City. Still a record high for the date.

2006
A huge mountain of mulch in Helotes catches fire and burns for over two months.  The mulch pile gets its own MySpace page and is nicknamed “Mulchie.”

December 17 in San Antonio history…

1929
Workmen begin conversion of the Princess Theater on Houston Street into Blum’s Department Store.  It was purchased in 1931 by Frost Brothers.  The building still stands at 217 E. Houston Street.

1980
The newly reconstructed Olmos Dam is dedicated.

1988
Bexar County commissioners re-enact the cornerstone laying ceremony of Dec. 17, 1892 at the site of the new County Justice Center.  The ceremony starts at 3 p.m. with a short parade which includes horse-drawn carriages carrying members of Commissioner’s Court and their wives, Sheriff Harlon Copeland, the Bexar County Sheriff’s Mounted Posse, County Clerk Bob Green, a color guard and the Theodore Roosevelt High School Rough Rider Band.  A time capsule will be buried during the ceremony.