Blog Archives

August 9 in San Antonio history…

1898
The pictures of some of San Antonio’s prominent citizens will be shown in Riverside Park in the Edison picture machine, as well as others, among which is the Battleship Texas.

1902
A real estate deed was filed this morning for the conveyance of the old Andrews homestead on Dallas for the Physicians and Surgeons Hospitals for $11,000.

1917 – World War I
Governors of the various states today received notice from Provost Marshal General Crowder that the first one-third of the quota of 687,000 men drafted for service in the national army will be called to the colors September 1, and sent to training camps before September 5. More than 200,000 will be called into service in the first increment, bringing the country’s total military forces up to one million men.

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May 29 in San Antonio history…

1898
The Rough Riders are going.  The entire regiment is expected to be out of camp and on the way to Cuba before nightfall.  They will leave even though they have not received all their equipment.

1917 – World War I
San Antonio and El Paso each are to each have a camp for the training of a division of troops under the recommendations of Brigadier General Parker, which were approved today by the War Department. The location of the other four division camps in the Southern Department were not announced by the department. It is believed the division to be trained at San Antonio will be stationed in cantonments to be built immediately at Camp Wilson. It is probable that troops now occupying Camp Wilson will be moved to Leon Springs and elsewhere to clear the entire site for use of the division.

1979
U.S. District Judge John H. Wood Jr. of San Antonio is assassinated while getting into his car at his home in San Antonio. Charles Harrelson, father of actor Woody Harrelson, is later convicted of the crime and sentenced to two life terms.

August 31 in San Antonio history…

1731
Ignacia Agustina Munoz y Morillo is the first recorded baptism in the parish of San Fernando.

1898
A party who read in the Sunday Light the proposition of the doctors to be allowed right-of-way when calling on patients, suggests that they be compelled to put gongs on their vehicles to prevent accidents.

1976
After 17 years of planning, battling and waiting, the end is in sight for completion of the North Freeway, now officially named the W.W. McAllister Freeway. The last section extends from Sandau Road on the south to north of Bitters Road on the north, a distance of some two or three miles. Construction on this final section should begin in five to six months and should be completed in about 18 months, according to Mal Steinberg, highway department consultant.

August 9 in San Antonio history…

1898
The pictures of some of San Antonio’s prominent citizens will be shown in Riverside Park in the Edison picture machine, as well as others, among which is the Battleship Texas.

1902
A real estate deed was filed this morning for the conveyance of the old Andrews homestead on Dallas for the Physicians and Surgeons Hospitals for $11,000.

1963hootenanny_1963
Mike Nesmith is the featured performer at a hootenanny held in La Villita Assembly Hall to raise money for the March of Dimes (right).  He would later find fame as one of The Monkees.

 

May 26 in San Antonio history…

1869
The velocipede (bicycle) makes its first appearance in San Antonio.

1898
The roof of the steeple at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church has been finished.  It is the highest and finest spire in the city.  A little work about the base of the slate roof yet remains to be done.

1933
San Antonio resident, Jimmie Rodgers, “The Singing Brakeman” dies at the Taft Hotel in New York.

July 15 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1915
Edward N. Hurley, vice chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, states that the United States will be “enormously wealthy” due to foreign trade if the war continues for another six months.

1895
Workmen began clearing out debris left in the Alamo after its use during the Civil War as a quartermaster storage barn.

1898
A Southern Pacific passenger train coming into this city from Houston made the last 57 miles between Luling and San Antonio at the rate of a mile a minute.  One of the passengers said, “Why,  I couldn’t count the telegraph poles!”

 

March 1 in San Antonio history…

1853
St. Mary’s Institute opens at its new location on College Street along the east bank of the San Antonio River.

1898
Bishop James Steptoe Johnson, second bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Missionary District of Western Texas, opens St. Philip’s Industrial Day School, which will become St. Philip’s College.

1955
Adina De Zavala, whose efforts helped preserve the long barracks on the grounds of the Alamo, dies at the age of 93.  Her funeral is held at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church and her casket is draped with the Texas flag.

 

August 31 in San Antonio history…

World War I – 1914
Another bomb was dropped on Paris by an aeroplanist yesterday.  Thankfully, it did not explode.  The French government is contemplating moving the seat of government from Paris to Bordeaux to escape the Germans.

1731
Ignacia Agustina Munoz y Morillo is the first recorded baptism in the parish of San Fernando.

1898
A party who read in the Sunday Light the proposition of the doctors to be allowed right-of-way when calling on patients, suggests that they be compelled to put gongs on their vehicles to prevent accidents.

1917
The 103rd Aero Squadron is organized at Kelly Field.  The display of its distinctive “Indian Head” insignia from the Lafayette Escadrille was authorized by the Chief of Air Service AEF, Brig. Gen. Benjamin Foulois, on 6 May 1918. Two days later 1st Lt. Paul F. Baer shot down two German airplanes to become the first ace of an American unit.  San Antonian Edgar Tobin (right) had six aerial victories as part of this unit during World War I.

July 15 in San Antonio history…

1898
A Southern Pacific passenger train coming into this city from Houston made the last 57 miles between Luling and San Antonio at the rate of a mile a minute.  One of the passengers said, “Why,  I couldn’t count the telegraph poles!”

1906 
Nightly visitors to the Electric Park were impressed by the illumination of 2,775 electric lights.

1981
The Jacksons, featuring lead singer Michael Jackson, play a concert in Hemisfair Arena, the fifth stop on a tour that began July 8 in Memphis, Tennessee.

May 16 in San Antonio history…

1883
The State of Texas buys the Alamo for $20,000.

1898
Every blacksmith and horseshoer in this city worked all day yesterday shoeing horses for the Rough Riders as peremptory orders were given by Col. Roosevelt soon after his arrival yesterday to have this done.

1946IMAG0619
A major hailstorm in San Antonio causes $5 million in damages.

1979
Mary Ann Castleberry, president of the San Antonio Conservation Society, announces today that the Staacke (right) and Stevens buildings in the 300 block of Commerce Street, have been saved from the wrecking ball.