August 10 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Car [streetcar] service between Camp Kelly and the city will be inaugurated Sunday morning by the operation of a shuttle service from the end of the Collins Garden line to the edge of the military reservation. The Public Service Company plans to maintain half hour schedules between the aviation post and the city car line for the present, and later shorten the schedule as the traffic may demand.

1982
Duval County rancher Clinton Manges and his lawyer, Pat Maloney, purchase the San Antonio Bulls franchise of the American Football Association.  They are looking to buy the San Antonio Spurs basketball team.  Team owner and CEO Angelo Drossos says the Spurs are “not for sale at any price” but later says he would entertain a “legitimate” offer with the understanding that the team would remain in San Antonio.

2011
Merle Haggard makes his penultimate San Antonio appearance at the Majestic Theater.

August 9 in San Antonio history…

1898
The pictures of some of San Antonio’s prominent citizens will be shown in Riverside Park in the Edison picture machine, as well as others, among which is the Battleship Texas.

1902
A real estate deed was filed this morning for the conveyance of the old Andrews homestead on Dallas for the Physicians and Surgeons Hospitals for $11,000.

1917 – World War I
Governors of the various states today received notice from Provost Marshal General Crowder that the first one-third of the quota of 687,000 men drafted for service in the national army will be called to the colors September 1, and sent to training camps before September 5. More than 200,000 will be called into service in the first increment, bringing the country’s total military forces up to one million men.

August 8 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
With only two days remaining before the close of the whirlwind campaign for the $10,000 War Recreation Fund, members of the San Antonio Rotary Club will “get busy and busier’’ to raise the money. Though the reports at today’s luncheon, which was held at the Menger Hotel, were not as gratifying
as those of Tuesday, there is no discouragement, but rather a determination to win out in the end.

1956
A man who threatened to blow up the Bexar County National Bank with nitroglycerine escaped with $2,000 in a daring daylight holdup today.

1987
The doors close for the final time on the downtown Joske’s store to prepare for a storewide renovation and transformation into Dillard’s.

August 7 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
A board of aviation officers, including Major Henry H. Arnold and Captain Edgar, from Washington, arrived in San Antonio this morning and reported to department headquarters before beginning an inspection of Camp Kelly and the auxiliary flying field. The two officers were taken to Camp Kelly by Captain Paul Ferron, aeronautical officer of the department, and probably will remain until Wednesday night.

1937
The first contribution to the newly constructed Alamo museum, comprising valued documents of early Texas, has been received by Mrs. Leita Small, Alamo custodian. The documents were presented by Mrs. Susan Miller, 115 Humphrey street, and her kinswoman, Mrs. James Sandusky Clarke, of Baltimore. Mrs. Clarke is a guest at the Miller home. Among the relics is the diary of James McKnight, who fought in the Texas revolution. The diary is dated 1838. McKnight was an ancestor of he donors. Still another of the documents is a letter dated 1842 and signed by T. Borden Jr., as collector of customs at Galveston.

1945
The San Antonio Express and Light newspapers both report that a bomb, larger than any previously known, was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima causing great damage and loss of life.  However, back on July 16, the San Antonio newspapers did not pick up a little-publicized story printed in the Gallup, NM;  Santa Fe, NM and El Paso newspapers that mentioned a huge explosion at a munitions dump near the Alamogordo Army Air Base.  This was actually the first nuclear test and would have been quite a scoop.  News of the July 16 test was finally printed today along with the news of the Hiroshima bombing.

1954>August 7 in San Antonio history...
Johnny Cash marries Vivian Liberto (right) at St. Anne’s Catholic Church in San Antonio.

August 6 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Provision to protect harvesting from shortage of hands due to the mobilization of the National army has been made by the government in regulations going out to the exemption boards. Men needed in fields to complete harvesting will be permitted to remain at work until the need for them passes. Local boards will determine what men are necessary in this class.

1993
Ground is broken for the new Central Library building at 600 Soledad Street.

1999
Singer Kelly Willis plays a concert in Gruene Hall while her brother-in-law Charlie Robison plays the Cabaret in Bandera.

August 5 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Plans for the “Joffre Tribute,” which will be given in San Antonio August 18, are now being made by the San Antonio committee for the Fatherless Children of France. The plans tor the day include a children’s parade which will assemble at 8:20 in the morning at the post office and march through the streets. The children will then give the day to selling French flags and the Lalique medals, especially designed by a distinguished French artist for this work.

1955
The 21st annual North-South All-Star high school football game is held in Alamo Stadium as the culminating event of the week-long Texas High School Coaches’ Association meeting held in the Alamo City.  The North team is coached by Mississippi State head coach, Darrell Royal, and the South is coached by Baylor University’s George Sauer.  The game ends in a 25-25 tie.

1966
Five unidentified flying objects, UFOs, were reported last night over the Alamo Heights area. A resident claimed that five separate aircraft of amber color appeared, going north to south.

August 4 in San Antonio history…

1891
The City Council passes the “Bawdy House Ordinance,” legalizing and licensing houses of prostitution.

1917 – World War I
Camp Funston is being put in readiness for the four-day “battle,” in which the student officers will be engaged in during their last week at the camp. The strenuous work of the last few weeks has been allowed to slacken perceptibly but the men are by no means being permitted to “soften up” before the “grand finale.” The “war” will begin before daylight next Tuesday, when the two armies, the red and the blue, fully equipped, will be carried in motor trucks several miles out into the country.

1932
A group of 150 business men this morning went on record as favoring the Roosevelt Avenue route for the proposed Highway 66.

August 3 in San Antonio history…

1883
The first issue of the San Antonio Light is published. (Originally published starting in 1881 as The Evening Light.)

1917 – World War I
Percy Tyrrell, manager of the Gunter hotel, who is district chairman for the movement which was recently started to train civilian cooks for the army in the hotels of the country, has been literally
“swamped” with applications within the last two days. Who will be accepted, however, must be left to Capt. J. II. Dickey of the quartermaster’s department who has charge of that phase of the work. To date, about twenty white men and almost a hundred negroes have made application for positions as army cooks.

1974
After an 11-day prison break attempt, San Antonio drug kingpin Fred Carrasco is killed in a shootout at Huntsville.  Carrasco, Rodolfo Dominguez, and two hostages die in the attempt.  Another hostage, Prison Chaplain Rev. Joseph O’Brien, is wounded in the chest and left arm.  Two inmate hostages are also slightly wounded.

August 2 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The physical examination of men drafted for service in the National army, which started today for Divisions I and 2, demonstrates that an additional call probably will be necessary to make up the quotas required from San Antonio. This is not due so much to physical disabilities, as most of the men examined passed this without difficulty, but to the many claims for exemption based on marriage, dependent relatives or the fact that the registrants are not American citizens.

1928
Bexar Country today boasted its first woman sheriff. Mrs. Matilda Stevens, widow of Sheriff James Stevens, who died last night, was appointed to fill his unexpired term by the Commissioners Court.

1932
All-female Westmoorland College will admit boys as day students in all departments when the fall season opens, the college president announced.

 

August 1 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Saloons, clubs and wholesale liquor establishments located within the half mile radius of the arsenal, which were closed Tuesday afternoon by special agents of the bureau of investigation, will be allowed to reopen and continue business until further notice, according to a telegram from Washington received this morning by Judge J. L. Camp, United States district attorney.

1944
The first international flight arrives at San Antonio Municipal Airport from Mexico on American Airlines.

1945
The Catholic church has purchased the old Southern Hotel block between the city hall and the courthouse for $75,000, owner Martin Wright announced today.  Father J. L. Manning, chancellor of the archdiocese of San Antonio, confirmed the sale and suggested that the property might be considered as the site of a proposed rectory for San Fernando Cathedral in a postwar expansion program. A year ago the church purchased the two-story Witte building on the western side of the parking lot at a reported price of $40,000 from Joe Olivares of West Commerce Street.

1945
The San Antonio Public Library purchases a rare first edition King James Bible and other rare books with money donated by the estate of Harry Hertzberg.