Monthly Archives: July 2017

July 31 in San Antonio history…

1955
The San Antonio Chamber of Commerce announced plans for a weeklong celebration honoring Davy Crockett, “King of the Wild Frontier.”

1971
San Antonian David Scott and fellow astronaut James Irwin, become the first people to drive a car somewhere other than earth as they take NASA’s lunar rover for a spin on the surface of the moon.

1986
Signaled by a series of blasts from the 5 p.m. whistle at the Alamo Ironworks, the 15th annual Texas Folklife Festival kicked off today on the grounds of the Institute of Texan Cultures.  In honor of the Texas Sesquicentennial, admission will be free tomorrow from noon to 1 p.m.

July 30 in San Antonio history…

1894
Iconoclast William Cowper Brann is fired as editor of the San Antonio Express newspaper.

1917 – World War I
Declaring that thousands of men of draft age evaded registration and have escaped the call to the army, Attorney General Gregory today instructed all United States attorneys to begin a round-up of the slackers and start criminal prosecutions.

1992
Foley’s department store opens in Rolling Oaks Mall.

July 29 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Congressional approval for the purchase of 16,663 acres of land adjoining the Leon Springs military reservation is now virtually assured, according to news dispatches received Saturday from Washington. This project, first suggested by Col. Harry L. Rogers, now with the expeditionary forces in France has been recommended by the War Department and is now before the appropriations committee of the House, which has indicated it will make an early and favorable report.

1976
An estimated 100,000 people turned out today for the grand opening of Windsor Park Mall, San Antonio’s largest enclosed regional shopping center.

2003
The Dixie Chicks play to a near-capacity crowd at the SBC Center amid cheers and boos for a controversial remark about President Bush on March 10 in London.

July 28 in San Antonio history…

1928warming_up
The Texas Theater shows its first “talkie” motion picture and the first from Paramount Studios – “Warming Up,” featuring Richard Dix.

1931
Approval of the designation of the present Post Cemetery at Fort Sam Houston as an addition to the San Antonio National Cemetery has been granted by the War Department, according to word received at the Eighth Corps Area today. The new cemetery is on the east side of the Austin road immediately south of Dodd Field, and is on a hill overlooking the city. The section along the highway will be maintained as a park. The San Antonio National Cemetery is east of the city, adjacent to the city cemeteries.

1969
Work begins on the restoration of old Hangar 9 at Brooks Air Force Base.  Originally created as a temporary structure in 1917, the hangar is the oldest existing aircraft hangar at any U.S. Air Force Base.  The hangar will become a museum dedicated to the late astronaut Edward H. White.

1976
The F-15 Eagle makes its first appearance at Kelly AFB on a flight from Luke AFB in Arizona.   The San Antonio Air Logistics Center at Kelly welcomed the Eagle.

July 27 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
The control of preventable diseases in cities near army camps by Federal agents, assisted by men and women inspectors and the co-operation of local physicians, as a plan suggested to the authorities at Washington, was the subject of an interesting address led by Dr. W. B. Russ, at the luncheon meeting of the San Antonio Rotary Club today.

1961
A senate committee approved a bill which would close most Texas businesses on Sunday.

1973
Willie Nelson, Leon Russell, Johnny Bush, Sammi Smith, El Curro and Gino Scorza entertain at the Menudo World Championship held at Raymond Russell Park.

July 26 in San Antonio history…

1901
Firemen who saved the Maverick Bank Building from flames recently were treated to a Mexican supper last night by P. H. Swearingen, who has a drugstore on the first floor of the building.

1917 – World War I
A Camp Kelly soldier was sentenced to seven year’s hard labor for saying “I don’t like that damned fellow, Wilson.”

1981
The first jazz mass ever celebrated at a Catholic church in this area – and possibly in the entire Southwest – is held in San Fernando Cathedral.  Jim Cullum and the Happy Jazz Band provided their interpretations of hymns and spirituals to a 7:30 p.m. service conducted by Father Louis White.

July 25 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
Adjutant General Hutchings at noon today announced the list of divisions and the quota of men that must be furnished by each county or division under the draft act. The total quota for the state of Texas is 30,545 which is split up among the various divisions. Under the allotment as announced, San Antonio must furnish 151 men to the new army while Bexar county, outside of San Antonio, will be called upon for 238 men.

1957
Gasoline prices dropped today to 18 cents a gallon in the recent gas war. Drivers are cheering but station owners wear long faces.

1992
James Taylor plays a concert at Sea World of Texas.

July 24 in San Antonio history…

1885
Track laying begins for the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad.

1917 – World War I
The $64,000,000 airplane bill became a law today with President Wilson’s signature.  More than 20,000 planes are to be built as a first increment and many thousands of aviators will be trained.

1956
Plans for a convention hall and civic center at La Villita were unveiled today by V. H. Braunig, City Public Service Board manager.

 

July 23 in San Antonio history…

1917 – World War I
By executive order issued today President Wilson prohibited the existence of disorderly resorts or saloons within five miles of any military camp. Any town within such radius licensing saloon would not be affected but no saloon may be within a half mile of camps. Private persons living within five miles of such a camp may have liquors in their possession for personal use but may not give them to any soldier.

1978
Sanitation workers in San Antonio go on strike.  Tensions are inflamed when City Manager Tom Huebner states that, “Those positions are easily filled.”

1981Kens0583
KENS-TV Channel 5 breaks ground on new headquarters and studios at 5400 Fredericksburg Road.

July 22 in San Antonio history…

1916
The newest thing in the Army is a motorcycle radio section. It consists of the complete equipment of a field wireless carried on three sidecar motorcycles.

1917 – World War I
More than sixty dollars in pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and even dollars, were subscribed during the first week of the Happy Tribe Million Penny War Fund to aid the poor Belgian and Flemish children, and the Happy Tribe campaign was launched with every indication of the most complete success.

1972
“The Hardest Working Man in Show Business” – James Brown – performs with his band The J.B.’s in Municipal Auditorium.  Get on up!